Great Brickhill

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 2383

Easting & Northing: 490230

Grid Ref SP900300 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Brickhill PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Brichella NAMES name for Great Brickhill in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1814. closed 1973
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1812
Cross End PLACE within the parish
Duck End PLACE within the parish
Green End PLACE within the parish
Smewnes Grange PLACE within the parish, now lost

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 560
1811 554
1821 558
1831 776
1841 721
1851 730
1861 590
1871 566
1881 557
1891 522
1901 491
1911 430
1921 482
1931 375
1941 N/A
1951 470
1961 536
1971 705
1981 779
1991 767

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1538   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1559   1902   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1559   1883   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Great Brickhill   Baptist   Burials   1830   1840   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surname

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HOPKINS LAWSON ADAMS LAWSON
2 SHEPPARD WARNER KING SMITH
3 WATTS COLEMAN SINFIELD ADAMS
4 BUSH SMITH CHEW COLEMAN
5 GATES HARRIS HOLMES KING
6 SMITH EDWIN STEVENS SINFIELD
7 MERIDALE SHEFFIELD SMITH HARRIS
8 EDWIN PEPPIAT PEPPIATT STEVENS
9 COLEMAN CHANDLER MORRIS CHEW
10 BETT SHEPPARD BATES HOLMES

Description

The name of the village is probably derived from a combination of the Celtic 'Bryh' (hill) and the Anglo-Saxon 'Hylle' (hilltop), although evidence has been found of much earlier Roman and Bronze Age settlements. The village is situated on a ridge, lying on a bed of Greensand and Oxford Clay, the highest point being 500 feet. Consequently, it has panoramic views from all sides over the surrounding farms and woodland and, in turn, can be seen from many distant villages.

Religion has played its part in village life, although the Methodist Chapel has been converted into a dwelling-house and the Baptist Chapel has been demolished. The parish church of St Mary shows evidence of Norman times, although the present building is mainly 15th century with later additions. The fine peal of bells is regularly rung and the organ, which is a very fine specimen, has recently been restored.

The village boasts two well-patronised public houses, the Red Lion and the Duncombe Arms, two shops (one incorporating the post office), seven working farms and, last but not least, a working forge. Houses run the gamut from 14th century thatched cottages, Georgian and Victorian homes, modern semis, right through to ultra-modern houses and bungalows.

The life style of the village has changed greatly in the past fifty years, with the majority of the adult working population now leaving the village for employment. As there is no regular bus service most families find it necessary to own a car, while a fortunate few have two or even three cars in the family. Mothers frequently complain that they have become unpaid chauffeurs for their children!

Historically, our most auspicious visitor appears to have been Oliver Cromwell, who is reputed to have spent some time in Great Brickhill, visiting his troops who rested here for six weeks while marching from Aylesbury to Northampton during the latter part of the Civil War. The rest was evidently just what the troops needed, as two months later the Parliamentarians claimed victory. The barn in which Cromwell stayed was later converted to a dwelling; it is now a listed building and still known as Cromwell's Cottage.

Another visitor of note was Benjamin Disraeli, at the time of his campaign to become an M.P. for Buckinghamshire. He frequently visited the village as a friend of the then Lord of the Manor, Philip Duncombe. The Manor has been in the ownership of the Duncombe family since the mid-1500s and descendants are still living there today, although the original house was destroyed in 1933.

At the present time, Great Brickhill is still a village completely surrounded by open country — whether it will survive as such or whether it will eventually be swallowed up by the Milton Keynes development remains to be seen.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Notes

Description of Great Brickhill from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of the parish of Brickhill Magna or Great Brickhill, is 2,370 acres; population, 730; rateable value, £3,268. The Ousel, or Little Ouse, divides the place on the west of Fenny Stratford and Stoke Hammond. The soil is principally a dark brown sand, with a small portion of clay: towards the stream the meadows are rich. "The surface, " says Lipscomb, "is broken into bold inequalities, lofty hillocks, and narrow chasms or ravines, which render its appearance, in some parts of the parish, very picturesque. Its name, perhaps, is to denote the greater extent of the hill on which the village is built, to the site of the adjacent parishes of Bow Brickhill and Little Brickhill." In 1771, about 1,260 acres were inclosed under the provisions of an Act of Parliament.

The village, which is situated 3 miles S.E. from Fenny Stratford, is scattered and contains many neat brick cottages, having small gardens in front. The view from about the centre od it, is varied and charming. Straw plat is made here by the women and children.

Great Brickhill Manor, the seat of Sir P.D.P. Duncombe, Bart., is a large handsome mansion of brick stuccoed, most delightfully situated on an imposing site, and commanding a splendid prospect. The house has recently been thoroughly repaired. The park is extensive, and the pleasure grounds are laid out in all manner of devices, and planted with the choicest flowers and shrubs.

Education

Great Brickhill Parish (Pop. 776)

Three Infant Schools, in which are 17 males and 24 females.

Two Daily Schools, containing 45 males and 35 females, all excepting one (towards which Mrs. Duncombe contributes £5 annually) entirely supported by payments from the parents of the children.

Three Sunday Schools, in one of the Established Church, 25 males and 25 females are gratuitously instructed and clothed every Easter Sunday

The other two are attached to Anabaptists and Methodists, by whom they are supported, and consist of 30 males and 35 females. One of the last commenced in 1832.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information