Whaddon

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 2525

Easting & Northing: 480234

Grid Ref SP800340 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Whaddon PARISH St Mary
Codimere Close NAMES name for Coddimoor 1547
Snelsoo NAMES name for Snelshall Priory
Wadone NAMES name for Whaddon Domesday Book in 1086
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1830
Coddimoor (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Snelshall Priory PLACE within the parish
Whaddon Chase (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 545
1811 548
1821 525
1831 512
1841 544
1851 548
1861 493
1871 476
1881 405
1891 398
1901 321
1911 314
1921 273
1931 274
1941 N/A
1951 346
1961 347
1971 370
1981 397
1991 442

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Whaddon   St Mary   Baptisms   1584   1900   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Whaddon   St Mary   Marriages   1584   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Whaddon   St Mary   Burials   1585   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 LEA KING KING KING
2 EMERTON POLLARD SMITH SMITH
3 UNDERWOOD UNDERWOOD UNDERWOOD UNDERWOOD
4 EMMARTON PHILLIPS FAULKNER MISSENDEN
5 EVANS TAYLOR GRACE FAULKNER
6 REEVE CRANE MACKERNESS MACKERNESS
7 CARTWRIGHT CARTER SAUNDERS GRACE
8 LYNE MISSENDEN MISSENDEN JAMES
9 COOKE WILLIS JAMES TAYLOR
10 KYNGE SMITH SEAR SAUNDERS

Memories

I was born Maria Hopkins in 1889, the youngest of Whaddon twelve children. There were many Hopkins in the village where ancestors had lived for at least four hundred years. My mother, aged eighteen in 1862, walked, in pattens, from Aylesbury carrying my brother, a babe in arms. We lived in a bungalow at Snelshall, where there was once a priory, for my father worked on a farm. At the age of five I started school at Whaddon, walking across the fields, unless the floods were out, when we had to go round by Tattenhoe. There were a hundred children in the school, built in 1841, a long building, divided into three. The infants' room had desks raised on a gallery where we sat all day. Mr Marshall, the headmaster, was strict but kind and my school days were happy. I left at fourteen. We were taught manners and the three R's. As my mother came from Stratton Audley she could not do Bucks lace so I went with other girls to Mrs Clark to learn, sitting round a stool with a candle and a bottle of water to reflect the light.

Two of my sisters died of diptheria in one week.

We never had a holiday, but went on Sunday School and Band of Hope outings in a 'brake'. I met my future husband, Sidney Meacham from Newton Longville, on one of these excursions to Claydon House.

The first Christmas tree I saw at school was given by the lady at the 'Big House'. I was disappointed with the steel bead bag that was given to me!
I was a founder member of Whaddon WI in 1936.
A cousin was a hurdle maker and his son has his old tools with queer names like a 'frommer'.

Many words are no longer used. The fields—now joined together—had lovely names like 'The Pightle', 'The Big Fodderer', 'The Mutton', 'Hog's Piece' and "The Canals'.

Words connected with farming we used every day were thave (a sheep), yealm (a straw measure for thatching), ennus (hen house), cow us (cowshed), yo(eye), housen (plural of house), tis-sacky (poorly), muckle (manure), hummocksing (plodding), thribble (triplet lambs), cherry cud (a cow's first milk), a boy chap (big boy), Grampy (grandpa).

The corn and hay were cut with scythes and then tied by the binder; and we all went gleaning to feed our hens. We took Dad's 'baver' to the field to him, probably a Buckinghamshire clanger (a suet roll with bacon at one end and jam at the other) with home made beer.

Maria Meacham , Whaddon

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

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This small village stands high on a ridge nearly 500 ft above sea level, overlooking Whaddon Chase with the new city of Milton Keynes in the distance.
The name Whaddon is an old English word for 'Wheat Hill' and the village is mentioned in the Domesday Book.

 

It is best known as the original home of the Whaddon Chase Foxhounds, started by the Selby-Lowndes family back in the 1800s. Unfortunately this hunt no longer exists, as it has recently been incorporated with the Bicester and Warden Hill Hunt. There is still a lane in the village known as Kennel Lane where the hounds were once kept.

Whaddon Hall was the Manor House for many years and the home of the Lowndes family from 1783 when Mr W. Lowndes Selby took possession of the Hall. In 1813 his son took again the family name of Lowndes after that of Selby, and so the name of Selby-Lowndes became associated with the village and remains in the memory of many of the older villagers.

The present Whaddon Hall is at least the fourth to stand on the site. The Lowndes family left to live in Winslow at the beginning of the Second World War, when the Hall was taken over by the War Office, later to be replaced by the Foreign Office. In the 1960s it became a factory, and, in the 1970s was to be turned into a Country Club, but unfortunately this venture ended with a fire, resulting in the building being gutted, after which it was sold and has now been converted into four luxury apartments with the stable block and the two gate lodges also having been converted into houses.
Across the Parks, due east from the Hall, is the site of Sneshall Priory, a small house for Benedictine Monks dedicated to St Leonard in about 1218. The stone from this priory was used to build the small church of St Giles at Tattenhoe which comes under the benefice of Whaddon and is still used regularly during the summer months.

Whaddon has now got an approximate population of 500. Unlike a few years ago, when most of the village people worked at Wolverton, either at the British Rail Engineering Works or McCorquodale Printing Works, with many working in agriculture, now only a few are still employed in these industries. With Whaddon becoming a dormitory village to Milton Keynes, people now work in Milton Keynes and surrounding districts or commute to London.

Like most villages, Whaddon has changed over the years from being almost self supporting by having its own bakery, butcher's shop, blacksmith and tailor, to the village life we have today.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Education

Whaddon Parish (Pop. 512)

One Daily School, endowed with £10 per annum, by the late Thomas Coare, Esq., and further supported by W. S. Lowndes, Esq. and the Vicar.   In this School 21 males are receiving gratuitous instruction.

Two Sunday Schools, supported by subscription ; in one, are 14 males and 36 females, who attend the Established Church; the other appertains to Dissenters, and consists of 14 children of both sexes.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


Additional information