Chearsley

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 943

Easting & Northing: 471210

Grid Ref SP710100 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Chearsley PARISH St Nicholas
Cerdeslai NAMES name for Chearsley in Domesday Book in 1086
Charesley NAMES name for Chearsley in 1526
General Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1822. Rebuilt 1854

 

Places

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Stock Well, Chearsley Stock Well, Chearsley
Victoria County History Victoria County History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Search The National Archives for Chearsley Search The National Archives for Chearsley

Photographs

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 214
1811 217
1821 263
1831 337
1841 308
1851 292
1861 287
1871 311
1881 235
1891 242
1901 212
1911 276
1921 260
1931 240
1941 N/A
1951 271
1961 309
1971 412
1981 433
1991 486

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1574   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Marriages   1571   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Burials   1576   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BRIGHTWELL BADRICK WALKER WALKER
2 OLIVER GUNTRIP BADRICK BADRICK
3 WHEELER WILSON SMITH WILSON
4 WOODBRIDGE BETTS WILSON SMITH
5 PARKER MOSS WHITE WHITE
6 WILLSON OLIVER NEAREY GUNTRIP
7 BIGG WALKER RAY WOOD
8 WINTER WILLSON HORTON RAY
9 FLOID BURT WOOD OLIVER
10 BIGGE REYNOLDS TOMBS NEAREY

 

Description

Chearsley is a small village of less than 500 inhabitants. The unknowing traveller can easily miss its charms as very little of the village is on view from the main road. The detour down the side of the hill, with the winding, hollow lanes, is worth taking.

The village probably developed from a collection of small scattered farmsteads which, by the 9th century, was known as 'Ceored's leah'. By the time of the Domesday survey in 1086, there may have been about 50 inhabitants. Later, the village developed on the north and east side of the church, and the remains of a medieval moat can be seen in the field between the church and the river Thame.

Many of the cottages are thatched, and if a walk is taken down School Lane, there is an old terrace of cottages, which used to house the lace makers of yesteryear. If the electricity wires are ignored, one can almost see the ladies, with their straw pillows and bobbins, sitting outside the cottages, making their beautiful Buckinghamshire lace patterns. This is also the spot where the ratcatcher used to frighten the girls coming out of school! He would save the little white mice he had caught and place them under his hat. On seeing the schoolgirls, he would raise the hat in true gentlemanly fashion, and the mice would cascade to the ground!

In the Conservation area, Watts Green is particularly picturesque, with its mixture of thatched, timber and witchert dwellings. This was once the 'tradesmen's' section of the village, with a shop, ale-house, cobbler's shop and nail-makers shed in close proximity to each other, around the green. The nail-maker's shed can still be seen in the garden of 'Needlemakers' cottage, but, sadly, the matching cobbler's shed on the other side of the lane was destroyed.
At the bottom of the hill, stands the 12th/13th century church.  This little building with its simple white interior, is much loved by all who visit.
Near the church, is a spring which trickles into a pond, known as Stockwell. It is suspected that this is the holy well to which pilgrims made homage in previous centuries. Chearsley has many springs and often water can be heard running through the road drains in the driest of weather. Stockwell was still running in the famous drought of 1976.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Chearsley from Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Chearsley is 1,130 acres, of the rateable value of £1,357. Population, about 290. The soil is a deep clay, with strata of limestone, sand, rubble, gravel.

The village, which is small, retired, and ancient, is situated at the foot and on the slope of an irregular hill near the course of the river Thame, 4 miles N.N.E. from Thame, and 7 miles S.W. from Aylesbury. The river divides the parish on the south side from that of Haddenham.

Chearsley was originally a chapelry to Crendon, and was included by Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham, in his endowment of Notley Abbey. The Church was made parochial, with rights of sepulture by the Bishop of Lincoln in 1458.

Education

Chearsley Parish (Pop. 337)

One Daily School, containing 30 children of both sexes who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, in which about 60 receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


 

Additional information