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Addington

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1303

Easting & Northing: 474228

Grid Ref SP743285 Click to see map

Names

NameTypeNote
Addington PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Edintone NAMES name for Addington in Domesday Book in 1086

Records

 

 Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
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Publication  
Addington   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1559   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Addington   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1558   1908   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Addington   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1558   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SMITH COULSON ADAMS SMITH
2 MEAKES GIBBS SHELTON MEAKES
3 WARD HOGG HUBBARD ADAMS
4 HALL THURLAND WESLEY SHELTON
5 BUSBY SHELTON SIRETT WARD
6 BROWNE STEVENS LINNELL GIBBS
7 WHITE MEAKES MATHISON BUSBY
8 MILLER ADAMS COLTON COULSON
9 EVERSLEY BUSBY HUNT STEVENS
10 ELLARD SMITH GIBBS HOGG

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 93
1811 99
1821 89
1831 72
1841 84
1851 71
1861 111
1871 141
1881 134
1891 100
1901 102
1911 149
1921 100
1931 91
1941 N/A
1951 103
1961 118
1971 87
1981 96
1991 73

There was no census in 1941.

Description

Addington - Description in 1861 from Sheahan

This parish contains 1,320 acres, according to the Parliamentary Returns, and the number of its inhabitants on the 8th of April in the present year (1861), when the census of the population was taken, was 111. Its rateable value is £1,763. The soil is caly and gravel; the greater part of the land pasture. The Oxford branch of the London and North-Western Railway passes through the S.E. side of the parish, occupying thirteen acres.

The village is small and very neat, and is distant from Winslow 2 miles W.N.W., and from Buckingham 5 miles S.E. A noble mansion called Addington Manor was erected here in 1857, by J.G.Hubbard, Esq., from a design by Mr P. Hardwick, architect, London.

 

Adstock

Introduction

Church: St Cecilia

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1166

Easting & Northing: 473230

Grid Ref SP735302 Click to see map

Names

Places

 

NameTypeNote
Adstock PARISH St Cecilia
Astocke NAMES name for Adstock in 1584
Edestoche NAMES name for Adstock in domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1834. Rebuilt 1889

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 289
1811 314
1821 393
1831 445
1841 419
1851 393
1861 385
1871 383
1881 352
1891 330
1901 329
1911 286
1921 247
1931 222
1941 N/A
1951 261
1961 261
1971 343
1981 346
1991 321

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
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Publication  
Adstock   St Cecilia   Baptisms   1539   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Adstock   St Cecilia   Marriages   1539   1912   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Adstock   St Cecilia   Burials   1538   1926   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SCOTT CORBETT WHITE WHITE
2 EGERTON KEYS PHILLIPS PHILLIPS
3 SEARE SEAR SIRETT CORBETT
4 TOMLINS SCOTT SMITH SCOTT
5 CLARKE HOGG CORBETT KEYS
6 EMERTON WHITE KEYS SIRETT
7 CLARK TOE KENT SEAR
8 SEER CLARKE CLARK SMITH
9 LEA BUTCHER PHILIPS CLARK
10 CARTER SEARE SEAR CLARKE

 

Notes

Notes

Adstock is a parish of 1,130 acres, in 1861, in the hundred of Buckingham. Three miles to the north-west from Winslow and four south-east of Buckingham.

There must have been some changes in the parish as the land covered was 1,166 acres in 1921.

Year Households Population
1841    
1851    
1861    
1871    
1881 86 852
1891 83 330
1901 83 329

 

Akeley

Introduction

Church: St James the Apostle

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1325

Easting & Northing: 470237

Grid Ref SP700370 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Akeley PARISH St James the Apostle
Achelei NAMES name for Akeley in Domesday Book in 1086
Ekeley NAMES name for Akeley in 1577
Oakeley NAMES name for Akeley in 1755
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1829
Akeley cum Stockholt PLACE within the parish
Akeleywood PLACE within the parish
Stockholt PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 245
1811 257
1821 295
1831 291
1841 362
1851 373
1861 366
1871 378
1881 387
1891 380
1901 341
1911 297
1921 267
1931 255
1941 N/A
1951 292
1961 339
1971 401
1981 426
1991 469

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

 

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Akeley   St James the Apostle   Baptisms   1600   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes, see our shop
Akeley   St James the Apostle   Marriages   1601   1901 Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes, see our shop
Akeley   St James the Apostle   Burials   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes, see our shop

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 INGRAM SMITH KNIBBS KNIBBS
2 COOKE CLARKE ADAMS CLARKE
3 COOK KEMP NICHOLLS NICHOLLS
4 ASHWELL HOBBS COX SMITH
5 HOBBS CLARK CLARKE HOBBS
6 BLUNT MASSEY HICKINBOTTOM ADAMS
7 MASSEY KING BATES KING
8 GIBBS COOK WINTERBURN KEMP
9 KING ASHWELL BUCKINGHAM COX
10 CLARKE WINTERBURN DUNKLEY WINTERBURN

Description

 

Akeley derives its name from 'Ake', the Anglo-Saxon word for , and 'Ley', a field. In the Domesday Book it is spelled Achelei. Akeley had a church in 1164 and its living came into the possesion Longueville Abbey.

Of the interesting people who were buried at Akeley one was a Ann Clark, who died at the age of 104 years. She saw no less seven kings and queens on the throne of England, being born in the reign of Charles II and dying in the reign of George III. Akeley used to be noted for its lace industry. It had a large school for teaching the children the art of pillow lace making in cottages opposite the Grey Hound public house which was also the village bakery. It is now closed and has been converted into a private house

Akeley also possessed a flourishing brickyard and pottery in the early part of the 19th century. This was owned by a Mr and Mrs Bartonn who specialized in making flower pots, drain pipes for the building trade, and ornamental pedestals, bread bins and bricks etc.  The clay was dug from a field at the back of the Pits, which used to have water at the bottom. The kiln stood for a number of years after the brick yard closed. The property was owned by a Mr Watts who had a large house and orchard in the village where some of the ornamental bricks were used in the garden walls, There was also a butcher with its own slaughter house, two shoe repairers, one post office and shop and another shop selling a large selection of goods and food.

During the First World War hundreds of horses taken from the farms and land were re-shod before being shipped off to the battle front in France. Milk was delivered straight from the farm to the houses in milk buckets and ladled into customers' jugs etc. Two coal and wood dealers used to make up faggots of wood. A local builder also made coffins.

Akeley Church was built in 1854 and the Methodist Chapel was built in 1829. The church was pulled down in 1979 owing to the rotting stone and the chapel closed down in 1986.

In Akeley Wood there is a very large school which was built on a large estate which was built by Mr C. Pilgrim Esq. and has changed ownership over the years.

The main event of the village social life was the Horticultural Show which was considered the best in North Buckinghamshire, This closed down in 1918 but was restarted in 1976 and is once again a popular social village event.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Education

Akeley Parish (Pop. 291.)

One Daily School, in which 3 boys and 3 girls are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, consisting of 30 males and 26 females (commenced 1829), supported by Wesleyan Methodists.
Abstract of Education Returns 1833

 

 

Memories

At the turn of the century, this little village in north Bucks was almost entirely self-supporting. There were two general stores, a butcher, a baker, who was also landlord of the Greyhound, a builder and undertaker, a coal and wood merchant, two cobblers, a tailor and a wheelwright who carried on his trade in the yard of the Bull and Butcher

There was a headmaster and two assistants in the little school, built in 1854, and a new church built on the site of an early thirteenth century one.
In addition, there was a thriving pottery where simple bowls, puncheons and flowerpots were made from clay obtained nearby, and hand-made bricks in sufficient quantities to build cottages in the village. Every Saturday a load of flowerpots, bowls and other crocks were taken to Buckingham market and from time to time into the surrounding villages.
Bread was made at the Greyhound by John Miller. When the bread was taken out of the ovens, villagers took their pies, cakes and stews to be cooked in the residual heat. On Sunday mornings the ovens were heated specially so that Sunday dinners could be cooked there, for the price of a penny-halfpenny.
Milk was fetched from the Church Farm where the farmer's wife, Mrs Winterburn, on Christmas Day stood a large basket of oranges by her door and gave one to each child who came for their milk.
In August, the village feast was held. The local showman, Sheppard by name, who lived at Blisworth when not 'on the road', brought all his gear and set it up in a field allowed for the purpose. Swings, roundabouts, shooting-gallery, hoop-la, were all manned by members of his family.
Akeley has always been a village of sturdy independence, with small farms and cottage industries. The nearest it came to having a squire was in 1873, when a gentleman named Pilgrim bought some land and built an Elizabethan-style residence in Akeley Wood. He also became patron of the living. His widow, Mrs Pilgrim, is still a legend in the memories of the older parishioners, for she was a strange woman of strong evangelistic tendencies, with generous impulses towards the village while seeking, by missioners and others, to instil the rigid code of her own beliefs.
The school children were taken in two wagons every Christmas by one of the farmers for a sumptuous tea and Christmas tree in the 'riding-school', now used as a gymnasium, since the house was converted to a preparatory school about forty years ago. At this Christmas treat each boy was given a muffler and the girls a doll. These dolls were beautifully dressed by Mrs Pilgrim's lady's maid. On May Day the children assembled there with their garlands to be judged by Mrs Pilgrim, and a doll given as a prize.
When Mrs Pilgrim died, she was buried at her expressed wish with feet towards the west instead of the east; her reason being that when she rose again at the Last Day, she would be facing towards her old home. On the stone slab, encircled by iron posts and chain around her grave, are two words only; Anna Pilgrim.
Lady Verney of Claydon House took an interest in the village school and provided wall-pictures which she changed periodically. They were usually by Landseer and contemporary artists.
The traditional country craft, Bucks lace, was' encouraged by a 'lace school' in a thatched cottage which was then opposite the Greyhound but which was pulled down later to make room for Council houses. Many of the village girls were taught there.
Akeley has a record of longevity, many living to their late nineties but none as yet exceeding that of Ann Clarke, who died in 1773 at the age of 104 as her tombstone shows. The story goes that one old lady who lost a daughter aged seventy lamented, 'Ah! I never did think I should rear her', and a retired postmistress remembers a mother and son, he aged seventy, both drawing the old age pension in the 1950's.
The old people remember the characters that village life produced and fostered, such as Jonas Knibbs, one-time sexton and verger, who was employed as milkman at Manor Farm and spent his Sundays in a frenzy of changing his clothes as he fulfilled the day's obligations: from milking to church, back to milking and then church again. Indeed, clothes were such a part of Sunday observance that children of careful parents might change from 'everyday' to 'Sunday best' three and four times.
Becky Knibbs—this surname was noted in the church registers for over two hundred years—lived in Duck End. She was a tall old woman who constantly wore a sun-bonnet and made medicaments from herbs kept fiercely secret.
Where the children once found excitement in watching the Duke of Grafton drive four-in-hand through the village, mothers now watch them anxiously cross the road where the great lorries and giant containers lumber along.
Plans for a new school are in preparation, modern houses stare brashly across the fields, the many little duck ponds have long been filled in, but to many of its older inhabitants Akeley is still the best place to live.

Edith Victoria Cox, Akeley

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Notes

Akeley is a parish on the road from Buckingham to Towcaster, 3 miles Buckingham station on the Verney Junction and Banbury branch of the London, Midland and Scottish railway. In the Buckingham hundred has an area of 1,325 acres and a population of 267 in 1921.

Ashendon

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2128

Easting & Northing: 470214

Grid Ref SP700140 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ashendon PARISH St Mary
Assedone NAMES name for Ashendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Assedune NAMES name for Ashendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Asshyngdon NAMES name for Ashendon in 1546
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Recorded 1851 Religious census
Hill PLACE within the parish
Pollicot PLACE within the parish
Watbridge PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 248
1811 319
1821 339
1831 368
1841 312
1851 290
1861 325
1871 274
1881 237
1891 199
1901 212
1911 227
1921 213
1931 200
1941 N/A
1951 167
1961 204
1971 191
1981 212
1991 236

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
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Publication  
Ashendon   St Mary   Baptisms   1590   1906   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Ashendon   St Mary   Marriages   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Ashendon   St Mary   Burials   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RICE EWERS EWERS EWERS
2 BAMPTON SMITH CHERRY CHERRY
3 TURNER ROSE EDWARDS SMITH
4 AMAN HUMPHREY MUNDAY EDWARDS
5 ROWLES NORRIS SMITH MUNDAY
6 JOHNSON BAMPTON FIGG FIGG
7 ADAMS HUMPHREYS WHEELER WHEELER
8 LEVERETT GREEN SAUNDERS SAUNDERS
9 HORTON EGLETON CHURCHILL TACK
10 EGGLETON BATES BETTS BAMPTON

 

Description

Ashendon, which includes the tiny hamlets of Upper and Lower Pollicott, is a small, friendly village which has changed relatively little in living memory. Built high on a ridge, it has magnificent views across the Vale of Aylesbury, particularly from the grounds of the 12th century church. The stone and brick cottages, some even thatched, convey the impression of an age old settlement, and indeed the 'place of ash trees on the hill' appears to have been of some importance in Saxon times.

Ashendon can boast of no 'big house' or well known personality, but it is a complete village, with its church, shop and public house, and the seven original farms still being worked, one of which has been farmed by the same family for at least 350 years. In the early part of the century a roadman was asked where a gentleman of the name of George lived; he replied, 'There b'aint no gentlemen in Ashendon, they be all farmers!' Agriculture remains the only industry in the village, and there are still several of the old village families left.

Although there is very little population movement, there is a good mix of old and new inhabitants, the newer ones always welcomed into the many and varied village activities. The traditional Ashendon Feast is alas now a distant memory of the past, recalled only by inhabitants in their late seventies and eighties. This was a great day to look forward to, always held on the first Tuesday in May, and folk used to say the weather would never warm up until after the Feast. The children were up bright and early, many going to the top of Lynch Hill to catch a first glimpse of the Fair people. A roundabout was soon erected in the Hanger, and swinging boats in the Square. Coconut shies ran parallel with the garden hedge of Cherry Cottage, and an old lady frying an inexhaustible supply of sausages was always part of the scene. Salt beef and ham were eaten in the evening at Ashendon Farm.

In 1962 a new village tradition began, originally to celebrate the belated hanging of a gate into the allotments. The gate had lain in the Hedge for several years, and at last two villagers fixed it in place. It was decided that a dinner should be arranged to mark the occasion, and each year since then the men of the village have met for the Ashendon Gatehangers dinner. Over the years the Gatehangers have helped the village in many ways, including gifts OAP's at Christmas, visits and gifts to people in hospital, and donations to help start the football club and to the Village Hall

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Notes

Ashenden is a parish in Ashenden hundred with a population in 1921 of 213 and is situated 9 miles to the west of Aylesbury.

In 1861 the population of Ashenden was 290.


Education

Ashendon (with Pollicot) Parish (Pop. 368)

The children of this parish attend a National School at Wootton, supported by the Duchess of Buckingham.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

Memories

Until just before the First World War, Ashendon was a completely agricultural village. About that time, the first farmworker broke away from that way of life to work on the railway, and this caused a stir.

There were and still are seven farms in Ashendon with eight to ten men working on each. Farm workers were very proud of the farms they worked on and there was a friendly rivalry between them. It used to be customary for the men to meet in the evenings to compare the day's happenings and to boast of their achievements. They had great pride in their work.

Farmers brewed their own beer in large quantities as it was part of the men's wages. They had beer mid-morning, beer with their lunch and beer at tea-time. The more they had the better they worked. The mower had a pint at 4 am before starting work. Probably a hundred gallons of beer was drunk by each man a year. At haymaking they had a pint between each load and at night there was free access to the cellar. Despite this they were always fit and ready for work the next morning.

As in most villages, there was the annual Feast which was the great event of the year. It usually took the form of sports with a good feed afterwards and was always held on the first Tuesday in May. The farmworkers were given the day off as a paid holiday for this occasion. They usually took the next day off as well, to recover.

Molly Boughton, Ashendon

Extracted  from ‘A Pattern of Hundreds’(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women’s Institutes 

Aston Abbots

Introduction

Church: St James the Great

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2198

Easting & Northing: 484220

Grid Ref SP840200 Click to see map

Names

 Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Aston Abbots PARISH St James the Great
B(e)yrdesthorne NAMES name for Burston in 1539
Birdsthorn NAMES name for Burston in 1563, 1609, 1723
Byrdyston NAMES name for Burston in 1517
Estone NAMES name for Aston in Domesday Book in 1086
Oxlease Farm NAMES name for Oxleys in 1826
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1805. Rbuilt 1839. Now two cottages
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1862
Burston, Upper & Lower PLACE within the parish
Oxleys PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 276
1811 267
1821 321
1831 303
1841 356
1851 343
1861 311
1871 327
1881 290
1891 281
1901 290
1911 312
1921 264
1931 247
1941 N/A
1951 288
1961 270
1971 271
1981 278
1991 328

There was no census in 1941.

{Tab Records}

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Aston Abbots   St James the Great   Baptisms   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Aston Abbots   St James the Great   Marriages   1559   1946   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Aston Abbots   St James the Great   Burials   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GREEN HEDGES KENT HEDGES
2 JEFFES MORTIMER HEDGES KENT
3 VYNCHER SMITH SIMMONS ELLIOTT
4 BETHAM GREEN ELLIOTT SIMMONS
5 HITCHCOCK ELLIOTT SMITH GREEN
6 RUSSELL PARKER BIERTON SMITH
7 THORNTON HITCHCOCK PARKER PARKER
8 HAWKINS GATES CARTER CARTER
9 ILLING AVERY ROADS HITCHCOCK
10 STANBRIDGE BATES WARR BIERTON

Notes

Aston Abbots is a small village in the Cottesloe hundred with a population of 343 in 1851, 311 in 1861, 327 in 1871 and 264 in 1921.

The church of St James has 140 sittings and has the war memorial in the graveyard. There is a Congregational Chapel which was built in 1839 and will seat 200. The Primitive Methodist chapel was erected in 1862 and seats 50 and has a Sunday School attached (1921) In 1861 there is a National School with 40 to 50 students.

 

Education

Aston-Abbots Parish (Pop. 303)

Three Daily Schools, wherein 40 children of both sexes are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, supported by Independent Dissenters, consisting of about 30 children.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

Aston Clinton

Introduction

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 3809

Easting & Northing: 487212

Grid Ref SP870120 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Aston Clinton PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Asen NAMES name for Aston Clinton in 1675
Aston Chevery NAMES name for Chivery in 1579
Aston Chewerey NAMES name for Chivery in 1543
Aston Chewery NAMES name for Chivery in 1532
Bradneg NAMES name for Bradnidge in 1543
Bradnege NAMES name for Bradnidge in 1639
Broardnedge NAMES name for Broadnege in 1703
Brunes NAMES name for Old Brun's in 1544
Cheverye NAMES name for Chivery in 1631
Dunriche NAMES name for Dunbridge in 1544
Dunrigge NAMES name for Dunbridge in 1544
Hareway NAMES name for Harelane Bridge in 1639
Marrwell NAMES name for Marl Copse in 1639
Merrimeade NAMES name for Merrymead in 1639
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Green End Street. First Mentioned: 1830. Rebuilt1830,1846,1897
Evangelical NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1878
Aston Hill PLACE within the parish
Bradnidge Wood PLACE within the parish
Chivery PLACE within the parish
Dunbridge (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Harelane Bridge PLACE within the parish
Marl Copse PLACE within the parish
Merrymead (Cottage) PLACE within the parish

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Aston Clinton   St Michael & All Angels   Baptisms   1566   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Aston Clinton   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1557   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Aston Clinton   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1559   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WELLS WELLS KEEN WELLS
2 DANCER BRANDON ROLFE KEEN
3 WELLES KEEN HORWOOD HORWOOD
4 BAMPTON WRIGHT KING ROLFE
5 MOUNTAGUE DANCER WRIGHT KING
6 BALDWIN BASSE FOWLER WRIGHT
7 GRANGE NORWOOD THORNE BRANDON
8 COOKE ALLEN THORN FOWLER
9 BRANDON HORWOOD AXTELL DANCER
10 WHITE BENNING FOSKETT SMITH

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 584
1811 652
1821 723
1831 854
1841 847
1851 928
1861 1108
1871 1235
1881 1317
1891 1246
1901 1131
1911 1178
1921 2791
1931 1494
1941 N/A
1951 1992
1961 2393
1971 2473
1981 3217
1991 3173

There was no census in 1941.

Description

Description

Aston Clinton is a large village nestling in the lee of the Chiltern Hills some 4 miles east of Aylesbury. It is traversed by the busy A41 trunk road with its tremendous volume of traffic. (It is now by-passed by the new A41)

The inhabitants mostly commute to the larger towns as there is little industry nearby. The saw mill owned by Mr Weston has long since disappeared, so has the wood-turning business run by Mr Marriott, who turned chair legs and sent them by the load to High Wycombe.

Just over seventy years ago Mr Howe ran a horse bus to Aylesbury and operated from the house now owned by the Raglan Kennels. In 1919 he acquired a motor bus which ran twice daily to the market town. However, the horse and cart was still the main mode of travel and the blacksmith had premises in the Main Street on the site of what is now Madge Garage, and the wheelwright resided further down the road. The present Partridge Arms was the home of the saddler.

Motor vehicles became more sophisticated and a maker by the name of Martin used to race his cars up Aston Hill; thus the name of Aston Martin was derived. This hill now forms part of the land owned and managed by the Forestry Commission.

Lords of the Manor, or Squires, include the medieval Minshull family, Lord Luke of Delhi, and Sir Anthony de Rothschild. It is the latter, one of the four sons of Nathan Maye de Rothschild, who is best remembered.
He came to live in Aston Clinton in 1853 and amongst his achievements was the establishment of the Chiltern Hills Spring Water Company. The Buckland, Drayton Beauchamp and Aston Clinton W.I. meet in the Anthony Hall, now a listed building, which was given to the village by Lady de Rothschild in memory of her husband.

It contains a painting of his two daughters Connie and Annie, who as children discovered that whereas boys were educated in the church school, girls were only allowed to attend a straw plaiting school situated in the main street. Although aged only eleven and nine respectively, the de Rothschild children took it upon themselves to teach the girls. Sir Anthony came to the rescue and built a girls school and subsequently, at her request, gave Connie an infants school for her sixteenth birthday present. The boys school vvas rebuilt in 1887 and is surmounted by the Jubilee Clock, which was erected to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria.

By a quirk of nature, the village has suffered three whirlwinds. One in 1950 when extensive damage was done, including the lifting of the school roof, causing the school to be closed, one in the late 1970s and one in 1984. The latter ripped off roofs, moved fences and garden sheds, splintered greenhouses and bent many a television aerial.

Although the adjoining parishes of Buckland and Drayton Beauchamp retain their independence, they have associations with Aston Clinton and share some of its amenities.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Notes

Aston Clinton parish included the ancient chapelry of St. Leonard which was in ruins by the 17th Century. St Leonard was formed into a separate parish in 1860.

Aston Clinton is in the Aylesbury hundred and is one of the many strip parishes along the Chiltern escarpment. The principle of strip parishes was to allow the even distribution of different land types for agriculture when the parishes were originally formed. The original parish is seven miles long and about a mile at wide.

The Aston Clinton, without St Leonard had an area of 2,670 acres in 1861. In 1921 both the ecclesiastical parish of Aston Clinton and St Leonard form the civil parish of Aston Clinton with a population of 2,791 people.

Sir Anthony De Rothschild, Baronet, became Lord of the Manor of Aston Clinton when it was purchased from the estate of Warwick Lake in 1851. The original manor house and moat were removed when a new mansion were built on the site. This house was pulled down in 1956 and the Green Park Training College now occupies the site.

 

 

Education

Aston Clinton Parish (Pop. 854)

Two Daily Schools, wherein 44 children are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, chiefly supported by the curate, the Rev. William Howard, in which 130 children of both sexes, receive gratuitous instruction.

Leonard, St., Hamlet (Pop. 147)

No School in the hamlet.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

 

Aston Sandford

Introduction

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 679

Easting & Northing: 475207

Grid Ref SP750070 Click to see map

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Aston Sandford   St Michael & All Angels   Baptisms   1813   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Aston Sandford   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1590   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Aston Sandford   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1576   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CARTER WILLIAMS HIGGINS HIGGINS
2 SMITH DOVER MATTHEWS WILLIAMS
3 SANDERS HUTCHINS DOVER DOVER
4 WILSON ASTON GOMME MATTHEWS
5 SAUNDERS LAMBERT GOMM SMITH
6 CHAPMAN SMITH WHEELER GOMM
7 LENTHALL HIGGINS AUSTIN WHEELER
8 SURMAN HANCE WILLOTT WILSON
9 STEVENS GOMM LUDLOW LAMBERT
10 WELHEAD MABLEY JOHNSON HUTCHINS

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 71
1811 76
1821 84
1831 82
1841 86
1851 88
1861 59
1871 58
1881 59
1891 48
1901 46
1911 41
1921 60
1931 49
1941 N/A
1951 60
1961 55
1971 51
1981 54
1991 40

There was no census in 1941.

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Aston Sandford PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Estone NAMES name for Aston in Domesday Book in 1086

Notes

Description from J .J. Sheahan in 1861.

This is a small parish of 669 acres, divided into two farms. Population 88, rateable value, £697.

It has its name from being a town of plase east of some particular village or manorial seat in Saxon times. The addition of Sandford was subsequently acquired from from the family of the Norman owners. The parish is locally situated in the hundred of Aylesbury, in a detached portion of Ashendon hundred.The soil is a deep, stiff, blue clay.

The village is small, neat and secluded, 4 miles E.N.E. from Thame, and 7.5 miles S.W. of Aylesbury.

Tosti held the Manor of Estone in the reign of the last Saxon monarch of England. Ater the conquest it was part of the possessions of Maigno Brito, who had the seat of his Barony at Wolverton. Towards the close of the 1th century it was held by the family of de Saundford, or Sandford, as of the Barony of Wolverton. From this family it passed in marriage to the De Veres, Earls of Oxford, about the middle of the 13th century. 



Education


Aston Sandford Parish (Pop. 82)

No School in the parish.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833



 

Additional information