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Gawcott

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 550

Easting & Northing: 468231

Grid Ref SP680310 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Gawcott PARISH Holy Trinity
Chauescote NAMES name for Gawcott in Domesday Book in 1086
Galcotte NAMES name for Gawcott in 1517
Gocot NAMES name for Gawcott in 1675
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Prebend End. First Mentioned: 1844

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 395
1811 467
1821 566
1831 N/A
1841 665
1851 619
1861 571
1871 540
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 N/A
1921 N/A
1931 N/A
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Gawcott   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1806   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Gawcott   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1862   1912   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Gawcott   Holy Trinity   Burials   1807   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 COLLETT LAW BENNETT BENNETT
2 NORTH WARR OSBORNE WARR
3 FENNIMORE NORMAN HOLTON OSBORNE
4 MEDCUFF GEORGE TURVEY HOLTON
5 WINTERBORNE WISEMAN WARR TURVEY
6 WHITE SMITH BLENCOWE SMITH
7 WISEMAN MARKHAM SMITH BLENCOWE
8 WATKINS HALL ROBINSON ROBINSON
9 JEFFERY COLLETT HARRIS HARRIS
10 COAR SCOTT TEW TEW

Description

Description of Gawcott as a Chapelry from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The village of Gawcott, which is large and compact, and has been much improved of late years, is situated two miles S.W. from Buckingham. The rateable value of the place is £1,367. The females are chiefly employed in making black pillow lace.

When the hamlet was inclosed (the Inclosure Act of 1821 included Prebend End, Gawcott, and Maids Morton) allotments were severally assigned to the Impropriators, and the Vicar, in lieu of tithes; and to the poor as a commutation of their ancient rights to cut furze on the waste land.

At Gawcott was an ancient chapel dedicated to St Catherine, the site of which is supposed to be a field called Chapel Close. The lane leading to it bears the name of Chapel Lane. No remains of this place of worship remains in Brown Willis's time. In 1806 Mr. John West, a native of this hamlet, born and brought up in very humble life, and who acquired considerable property by dealing in thread lace (then the manufacturer of this part of the county) built and endowed a new chapel - giving for that purpose, it is stated, between £4,000 and £5,000. "The foundation, however" writes Lipscomb, "having been very injudiciously laid, and the workmanship ill conducted, it was found necessary to rebuild the whole fabric" in 1828. This was done at a cost of about £1,750, (raised by subscription) including a parsonage also then erected.

The National School stands near the church, and was erected in 1839, at an expense of £338, raised by voluntary contributions. It is a neat building of stone, with red brick dressings. About forty children attend this school.

Mr George Gilbert Scott, of London,the eminent ecclesiastical architect, was born at the parsonage of Gawcott.

Granborough

Introduction

Church: St John the Baptist

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1580

Easting & Northing: 476225

Grid Ref SP760250 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Granborough PARISH St John the Baptist
Byggyng NAMES name for Biggin in 1766
Gainborough NAMES name for Gainborough in 1675
Grandborough NAMES name for Granborough in 1766, 1925
Grandborow NAMES name for Grandborough in 1653
Grenborough NAMES name for Granborough in 1535
Grenesberga NAMES name for Granborough in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1831. Rebuilt 1901
Biggin (lost) PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 230
1811 251
1821 286
1831 341
1841 345
1851 359
1861 374
1871 367
1881 300
1891 301
1901 297
1911 276
1921 239
1931 222
1941 N/A
1951 201
1961 261
1971 420
1981 410
1991 448

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Granborough   St John the Baptist   Baptisms   1538   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Granborough   St John the Baptist   Marriages   1538   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Granborough   St John the Baptist   Burials   1538   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS STEVENS NEWMAN STEVENS
2 HOLLAND HOLLAND HIGGINS HOLLAND
3 GRACE SMITH DANCER NEWMAN
4 PITKIN DANCER SMITH DANCER
5 STEEVENS PITKIN NORMAN SMITH
6 WORRALL KING CLARKE HIGGINS
7 EMERTON THORP STAIRS NORMAN
8 BOTON GILKS STEVENS CLARKE
9 TOMLIN CLARK FOSKETT STAIRS
10 RUTLAND BOWDEN BRADBURY PITKIN

 

Description

Description of Granborough from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

 This parish contains 1,560 acres and 374 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,847. The soil is a clayey loam with gravel. The village is small and stands on a swelling hill, from which the place is supposed to have its name. Is is distant 1.75 mile S. from Winslow, and 8 miles N. from Aylesbury, The females are chiefly employed in pillow-lace making. In the, Parish Register the name of the place is spelt Granborowe and Greenborough.

The vicarage house is a small residence, a short distance from the church, on its north side. The National School adjoining the southside of the church-yard, was built in 1852, and is a very neat brick building. About 50 children attend. There is a Dissenter's Chapel, a snall building.

Under the Act for inclosing the Commons and Waste lands of this parish, an allotment of 5a, 2r 22p. was awarded in 1797 to the poor parishioners, in lieu of a right of cutting furze. This land is divided into many plots, and cultivated and occupied by the poor.

Memories

Granborough was once part of the Manor of Winslow. A windmill stood on the hill in a field still called Mill Knob.

An older resident recalls the village in times past:

Granborough in the days of my youth was a very friendly village, full of people of all ages, some very old. One thing which remains in my mind is the old ladies sitting in the doorways of their cottages, a shawl around them to keep warm and a pillow on their knees, making lace, without spectacles or any other aid.
Most of the present day inhabitants work outside the village, except those who work on farms. We once had a blacksmith, a wheelwright and undertaker, a coal merchant, baker, builder, post office and general store.
I remember that at one time the house known as Granborough Lodge, then the Vicarage, was supposed to be haunted by a vicar who died at Scarborough by drowning. Although I lived there for a number of years I never saw him.
During the war there was a day of fear and excitement when an American plane dropped a bomb in Church Lane which demolished the house of Mr W. Newman, our greengrocer, and damaged a few others.
There are a very few of the old families left now, but lots of newcomers, who we are pleased to say are very friendly and helpful, both in the church and in social life.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education

Grandborough Parish (Pop. 341)

One Sunday School, with 36 males and 28 females, supported by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Great Brickhill

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 2383

Easting & Northing: 490230

Grid Ref SP900300 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Brickhill PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Brichella NAMES name for Great Brickhill in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1814. closed 1973
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1812
Cross End PLACE within the parish
Duck End PLACE within the parish
Green End PLACE within the parish
Smewnes Grange PLACE within the parish, now lost

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 560
1811 554
1821 558
1831 776
1841 721
1851 730
1861 590
1871 566
1881 557
1891 522
1901 491
1911 430
1921 482
1931 375
1941 N/A
1951 470
1961 536
1971 705
1981 779
1991 767

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1538   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1559   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Brickhill   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1559   1883   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Brickhill   Baptist   Burials   1830   1840   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surname

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HOPKINS LAWSON ADAMS LAWSON
2 SHEPPARD WARNER KING SMITH
3 WATTS COLEMAN SINFIELD ADAMS
4 BUSH SMITH CHEW COLEMAN
5 GATES HARRIS HOLMES KING
6 SMITH EDWIN STEVENS SINFIELD
7 MERIDALE SHEFFIELD SMITH HARRIS
8 EDWIN PEPPIAT PEPPIATT STEVENS
9 COLEMAN CHANDLER MORRIS CHEW
10 BETT SHEPPARD BATES HOLMES

Description

The name of the village is probably derived from a combination of the Celtic 'Bryh' (hill) and the Anglo-Saxon 'Hylle' (hilltop), although evidence has been found of much earlier Roman and Bronze Age settlements. The village is situated on a ridge, lying on a bed of Greensand and Oxford Clay, the highest point being 500 feet. Consequently, it has panoramic views from all sides over the surrounding farms and woodland and, in turn, can be seen from many distant villages.

Religion has played its part in village life, although the Methodist Chapel has been converted into a dwelling-house and the Baptist Chapel has been demolished. The parish church of St Mary shows evidence of Norman times, although the present building is mainly 15th century with later additions. The fine peal of bells is regularly rung and the organ, which is a very fine specimen, has recently been restored.

The village boasts two well-patronised public houses, the Red Lion and the Duncombe Arms, two shops (one incorporating the post office), seven working farms and, last but not least, a working forge. Houses run the gamut from 14th century thatched cottages, Georgian and Victorian homes, modern semis, right through to ultra-modern houses and bungalows.

The life style of the village has changed greatly in the past fifty years, with the majority of the adult working population now leaving the village for employment. As there is no regular bus service most families find it necessary to own a car, while a fortunate few have two or even three cars in the family. Mothers frequently complain that they have become unpaid chauffeurs for their children!

Historically, our most auspicious visitor appears to have been Oliver Cromwell, who is reputed to have spent some time in Great Brickhill, visiting his troops who rested here for six weeks while marching from Aylesbury to Northampton during the latter part of the Civil War. The rest was evidently just what the troops needed, as two months later the Parliamentarians claimed victory. The barn in which Cromwell stayed was later converted to a dwelling; it is now a listed building and still known as Cromwell's Cottage.

Another visitor of note was Benjamin Disraeli, at the time of his campaign to become an M.P. for Buckinghamshire. He frequently visited the village as a friend of the then Lord of the Manor, Philip Duncombe. The Manor has been in the ownership of the Duncombe family since the mid-1500s and descendants are still living there today, although the original house was destroyed in 1933.

At the present time, Great Brickhill is still a village completely surrounded by open country — whether it will survive as such or whether it will eventually be swallowed up by the Milton Keynes development remains to be seen.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Notes

Description of Great Brickhill from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of the parish of Brickhill Magna or Great Brickhill, is 2,370 acres; population, 730; rateable value, £3,268. The Ousel, or Little Ouse, divides the place on the west of Fenny Stratford and Stoke Hammond. The soil is principally a dark brown sand, with a small portion of clay: towards the stream the meadows are rich. "The surface, " says Lipscomb, "is broken into bold inequalities, lofty hillocks, and narrow chasms or ravines, which render its appearance, in some parts of the parish, very picturesque. Its name, perhaps, is to denote the greater extent of the hill on which the village is built, to the site of the adjacent parishes of Bow Brickhill and Little Brickhill." In 1771, about 1,260 acres were inclosed under the provisions of an Act of Parliament.

The village, which is situated 3 miles S.E. from Fenny Stratford, is scattered and contains many neat brick cottages, having small gardens in front. The view from about the centre od it, is varied and charming. Straw plat is made here by the women and children.

Great Brickhill Manor, the seat of Sir P.D.P. Duncombe, Bart., is a large handsome mansion of brick stuccoed, most delightfully situated on an imposing site, and commanding a splendid prospect. The house has recently been thoroughly repaired. The park is extensive, and the pleasure grounds are laid out in all manner of devices, and planted with the choicest flowers and shrubs.

Education

Great Brickhill Parish (Pop. 776)

Three Infant Schools, in which are 17 males and 24 females.

Two Daily Schools, containing 45 males and 35 females, all excepting one (towards which Mrs. Duncombe contributes £5 annually) entirely supported by payments from the parents of the children.

Three Sunday Schools, in one of the Established Church, 25 males and 25 females are gratuitously instructed and clothed every Easter Sunday

The other two are attached to Anabaptists and Methodists, by whom they are supported, and consist of 30 males and 35 females. One of the last commenced in 1832.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Great Horwood

Introduction

Church: St James

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 3271

Easting & Northing: 477231

Grid Ref SP770310 Click to see map

Names

 Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Horwood PARISH St James
Harwod NAMES name for Horwood in 1509
Harwood NAMES name for Horwood in 1766
Hereworde NAMES name for Horwood Domesday Book in 1086
Herwood NAMES name for Horwood in 1535
Horroda NAMES name for Horwood in 1512
Rodymore Hill NAMES name for Roddimore in 1756
Shinglesborough NAMES name for Singleborough in 1510
Shucklow NAMES name for Warren Farm in 1766
Shucklow Warren NAMES name for Warren Farm in 1826
Sincleberia NAMES name for Singleborough in Domesday Book in 1086
Synkleborow NAMES name for Singleborough in 1520
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1819
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1875
Greenway Farm PLACE within the parish
Norbury Coppice PLACE within the parish
Roddimore (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Singleborough PLACE within the parish
Six Lords Inn PLACE within the parish
Warren Farm PLACE within the parish

 

Lnks

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Victoria County History Victoria County History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Search The National Archives for Great+Horwood Search The National Archives for Great Horwood

Photographs

 

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 537
1811 581
1821 688
1831 720
1841 712
1851 834
1861 846
1871 866
1881 712
1891 639
1901 554
1911 584
1921 509
1931 526
1941 N/A
1951 715
1961 596
1971 1047
1981 973
1991 980

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Horwood   St James   Baptisms   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Horwood   St James   Marriages   1591   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Horwood   St James   Burials   1599   1862   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 VARNEY HARRUP MARKS KING
2 COOPER KING KING MARKS
3 DURRANT COOPER RIDGWAY RIDGWAY
4 CARTER VERNEY VICCARS HARRUP
5 HOBBS BRADBURY HARRUP VARNEY
6 FOSKETT HOBBS HALL HOBBS
7 SEARE BRADBERY SMITH COOPER
8 KING SHORT MUNDAY BRADBURY
9 BUTCHER CARTER YOUNG VICCARS
10 FOSKET WILLIATT JONES HALL

 

description

As early as 792 A.D. there is a reference to '10 dwellings in the wood called Horwudu'.
Our church of St James is of Norman origin being rather special in the fact that the tower is topped by a Norman 'helmet'.

During the Second World War years we have an airfield here and the village would vibrate to the sound of the engines of the Wellingtons warming up for take-off. All the R.A.F. quarters were at the back of the village away from the High Street. When the war ended we were allowed onto the Camp as it was called, to go to the cinema. Children were allowed in if accompanied by an R.A.F. person and we could sit on the floor in front of the chairs for 6d. or sit on a chair for 9d. The week Tokio Joe was shown it was packed houses and every time a Jap plane was shot out of the sky, the cheering by R.A.F. personnel and village children alike could be heard in Winslow.

Now the camp is a housing estate. The airfield is still there but is owned by a large consortium of well-known farmers and the fields between the runways are grazing for sheep and beef cattle. Intensive pig and poultry farming is also carried out.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes


 Description of Great Horwood from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Great Horwood, Horwood Magna, or Horwood-cum-Singleborough,contains altogether 3,109 acres, and 834 souls; of which 2,389 acres and 725 souls, belong to Horwood, and 720 acres and 130 persons to the hamlet of Singleborough. The rateable value of the entire parish is £3,866. The soil is a deep clay, intermixed with sand. There are about 200 acres of wood-land.
The village, which is large, and well and regularly built, forms one principal street, with an open space, called the Green, about its centre, in which a market was formerly held. It is situated on an eminence, on the verge of Whaddon Chase, 2.5 miles N. from Winslow, and 6 miles S.E. from Buckingham. The common fields of Horwood were inclosed under an Act passed in 1841.

Education

Great Horwood Parish (Pop. 610)

Three Daily Schools;

One contains 26 males, supported by subscription

The other two, 26 males and 8 females, who are instructed at the expense of their parents

Two Sunday Schools

In one of which are 29 males and 40 females (commenced 1821), who attend the Established Church

The other appertains to Independent Dissenters (commenced 1819), and consists of 38 males and 57 females, both supported by voluntary contributions.

Singleborough Hamlet (Pop. 110)

One Daily School (commenced 1829) in which 4 males and 10 females are instructed at the expense of their parent

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Grendon Underwood

Introduction

Church: St Leonard

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2536

Easting & Northing: 468220

Grid Ref SP680200 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Grendon Underwood PARISH St Leonard
Grennedone NAMES name for Grendon Underwood in Domesday Book in 1086
Gryenedone NAMES name for Grendon Underwood in 1626
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Kingswood. First Mentioned: 1841
Finemerehill House PLACE within the parish

 

Grove

Introduction

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 437

Easting & Northing: 491222

Grid Ref SP910220 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Grove PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Langrave NAMES name for Grove in Domesday Book in 1086

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 25
1811 33
1821 18
1831 21
1841 25
1851 38
1861 19
1871 23
1881 17
1891 19
1901 19
1911 30
1921 19
1931 29
1941 N/A
1951 28
1961 12
1971 15
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Grove   St Michael & All Angels   Baptisms   1576   1967   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Grove   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1606   1956   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Grove   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1577   1963   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BUNKER WATERS WATERS WATERS
2 WATERS SYMONS DRAPER DRAPER
3 NEWLAND NEWLAND HUMPHREY SYMONS
4 DAGNALL SYMONDS SEAR NEWLAND
5 BALENGER FOX RICKARD SYMONDS
6 WALKER WRIGHT ARNOLD HUMPHREY
7 PHILIPS RICHARDS CHERRY FOX
8 PARRATT WALTER GOODSON WRIGHT
9 HYDE SHACKLEY BIRCH WALTER
10 HALLY WALTERS WARREN RICHARDS

Notes

Description of Grove from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This is a very small parish on the borders of Bedfordshire, two miles south from Leighton Buzzard, and containing only 210 acres, according to the census return of 1851. One farm house, and two cottages are the whole of the residences. Population 19 souls. The Grand Junction Canal, and London and North-Western Railway pass through the parish. The soil is chiefly clay. There is an ancient mill here, situated on the river Ouse.

The Living, a discharged rectory, is valued in the King' Books at £4 13s 4d. and was held with Wing, after the manor came to the Dormers. In 1650, it was returned as a Chapel to Mentmore, and of the annual value of only £11. It was afterwards augmented by the Bounty of Queen Anne, and in 1787, Anne, Baroness Godolphin, endowed it with a yearly rent-charge of £8. Ist present value is £68 per annum. Patron Lord Overtsone.

Education

Grove Parish (Pop. 21)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Haddenham

Introduction

Haddenham Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 3274

Easting & Northing: 474208

Grid Ref SP740080 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Haddenham PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Bigstropp NAMES name for Bigstrup in 1703
Nedreham NAMES name for Haddenham in Domesday Book in 1086
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1655. Present building 1809
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Burial ground. First Mentioned: 1710
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST High Street. First Mentioned: 1822
Aylesbury & Thame Airport PLACE within the parish
Bigstrup (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Grove End PLACE within the parish
Scotsgrove PLACE within the parish
Skittles Green PLACE within the parish
Stockwell PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 964
1811 1038
1821 1294
1831 1484
1841 1545
1851 1703
1861 1623
1871 1514
1881 1443
1891 1282
1901 1223
1911 1409
1921 1403
1931 1361
1941 N/A
1951 1666
1961 2240
1971 3569
1981 4815
1991 4599

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Haddenham   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1653   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Haddenham   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1576   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Haddenham   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1601   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Schools

School Records Project

 

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Haddenham         Haddenham     1873     1899     Yes     Logbook
    Haddenham         Haddenham     1899     1916     Yes     Logbook
    Haddenham - Not available         Haddenham     1916     1938         Logbook
    Haddenham - Not available         Haddenham     1938     1950         Logbook
    Haddenham - Not available         Haddenham     1894     1944         Minute Book

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CLARKE CHAPMAN ROSE ROSE
2 GREENWOOD CLARKE CLARKE CLARKE
3 COX PLATER CHAPMAN CHAPMAN
4 PLATER FRANKLIN PLATER PLATER
5 CHAPMAN ROSE WILSON COX
6 FRYDAY COX SAW FRANKLIN
7 FRANCKLIN JARVIS RAY HILL
8 HILL GREENWOOD PARKER PARKER
9 BARNARD FRYDAY PLASTOW JARVIS
10 ROSSE EUSTACE ING GREENWOOD

 

Notes

Church End Green is the focal point of the village. It was the Saxons who built a church by the side of the green, so maybe we owe this lovely "scene to Hadda the Saxon thane. It is thought the name of the village came from 'Hadda's Hame' becoming Haddenham. The church as we know it today was built about 1215, at least it was begun then, the Lady Chapel being the oldest part. In 1295 Edward I granted Haddenham a Charter to hold a weekly market and annual fair. The weekly market has long since gone but we still celebrate our Haddenham Feast with an open-air service and a fair in late September every year. Once it was the high spot of the year when a day's holiday was given to all the farm workers (the only holiday other than Christmas Day) and sons and daughters from miles around came home for the fun.

The house names round the green tell some of their history; the Malt House where once there was a brewery; Eight Bells and the Anchorage which were both inns. Haddenham had a great many at one time. At the back of the pond is the entrance to Church End Farm which goes back in history nearly as long as the church and has a fine tithe barn. When the Norman Archbishop Landfranc held the church this was the seat of power for his agent.

Churchway is the main road through the village. Flint Street which leads away from the Church was once the main thoroughfare of the village. Its old houses are all picturesque and stand close to one another. In times past it was Duck Street, emphasising once the main trade of the village.

The Green Dragon is one of the most thriving pubs in the village. It's had an interesting past, as the manorial courts used to be held there. The Green Dragon was the emblem of the Earls of Pembroke who had authority here for a while after the Reformation. Someway further down on the other side is the Beehive, a village store (reputed to have a ghost). There has been a shop here for hundreds of years. It used to sell all kinds of things including items of clothing for the village families, but now it is a specialist grocer.

The old high walls in Haddenham are rather special. Modern ones are of breeze-block and rendered, but they copy the old, some still remaining, and they used to line every street. They were made of a kind of clay called witchert that is peculiar to this area. A stone base of about 18 inches was covered by the clay held in place until set by wooden shutters. Cottages used to be built like this too and the Baptist and Methodist Churches in Haddenham are built of witchert. The tops of the walls were thatched to keep the wet from going down into the clay. From this sprang the old saying 'Silly Haddenham who thatched the ponds to keep the ducks dry'. Not really so silly as the wide eaves over the pond sheltered the little ducks who do indeed drown if their early feathers are not protected from the rain.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description


Description of Haddenham from J. J. Sheahan, 1861. This parish is bounded on the north by Cuddington, and on the west by the river Thame. Its area is 3,150 acres; population 1703; rateable value £5,693. The land is nearly all arable; the soil is light earth, or clayey loam, intermixed with small rubble stones, and in some places it is sandy. It is very fertile. The surface is flat with one or two trifling elevations. In the quarries are found large beds of oyster shells, and other of the like genus. A spring, called Dadbrook, near the road to Cuddington, and another called Steward's Well, on the Manor Farm, are slightly chalybeate. The parish was enclosed in 1832.

The village is situated 5.5 miles N.W. from Princes Risborough, 3 miles N.E. from Thame, and 7 S.W. from Aylesbury, which is the nearest Railway Station. It is very large, (about a mile in length) much scattered, and most irregularly built, and has a singular appearance. That portion of it in the immediate vicinity of the church, now called Church Square, has on each side of it some very respectable houses, and many of the fences of the gardens are built of a kind of marl dug here near the surface and called Wichert (or White-earth), which is very hard and durable, and quite impervious to moisture. The place is remarkable for the non-conformity of the houses, and the numerous narrow, crooked, and zig-zag passages with which it abounds.** Many of the females are engaged in the manufacture of pillow lace.

The present landowners at present are the Baroness Wenman, of Thame Park, the Dean and Chapter of Rochester, the Rev. Henery Sprigg, Miss Cross, John Francklin, Esq., James Rose, Esq., Messrs. T. and W. Rose, Edward Clarke, and Charles Bailey Hamilton Esq.

** On the 16th April 1701, a great fire at Haddenham burnt and totally destroyed 30 houses, with numerous barns, stables, and outhouses - the loss of property amounting to between £3,000 and £4,000. and on the 5th of April 1760 (Easter-eve), another most disastrous fire broke out in the premises in Church Square, now occupied by John Clarke, Esq,. when about 60 houses were consumed, at a loss estimated at from £4,000 to £5,000. The Vicarage House of that period fell prey to the flames, and all the parish registers, except one dated 1603 (which was in the church), were destroyed. The last mentioned fire is said to have originated through the carelessness of a servant girl throwing burning wood ashes and embers into an outhouse. It is perhaps remarkable that there is no fire engine in the village at the present time.

Education

Haddenham Parish (Pop. 1,484)

Two Daily Schools, containing 46 males, who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, one attached to Baptists, consists of 136 males and 137 females, having a lending Library: the other to Wesleyan Methodists (commenced 1827), and consists of 39 males and 54 females, both conducted by gratuitous teachers.

There are also several small Schools where lace-making is taught.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

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