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Little Horwood

Introduction

Little Horwood Parish

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1948

Easting & Northing: 479230

Grid Ref SP790300 Click to see map

Names


Places

NameTypeNote
Little Horwood PARISH St Nicholas
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Recorded in 1851 religious census
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1847
Whaddon Chase (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 339
1811 325
1821 429
1831 431
1841 392
1851 427
1861 449
1871 411
1881 309
1891 304
1901 267
1911 293
1921 258
1931 255
1941 N/A
1951 332
1961 260
1971 287
1981 321
1991 357

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Little Horwood   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1568   1866   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Horwood   St Nicholas   Marriages   1568   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Horwood   St Nicholas   Burials   1575   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HAWKINS ILLING CURTIS ILLING
2 ILLING COX ILLING CURTIS
3 ADAMS PITKIN FAIRMAN PITKIN
4 BARTON WHITE VICCARS GASCOIGNE
5 VARNEY VICARS GRAINGE GRAINGE
6 ROBINSON CURTIS GIBBS GIBBS
7 PITKIN SMITH GASCOIGNE FAIRMAN
8 BARBAR CLARKE PARKER VICCARS
9 WILLSON WILMER WALTON HARRIS
10 ILLINGE GASCOIGNE LEONARD WHITE

 

Description

The village was known as Parva Herewode or Horwude in the 13th century, Parva Horwode in the 14th, Harwood Parva in the 17th, each name referring to the woods and the heavy clay soil in the area. When the field system was developed the Roman unit split into two parishes and Little Horwood became a village in its own right. It was not mentioned in the Domesday Book, being included in the Winslow manor which belonged to the Abbot of St Albans until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Little Horwood's church, St Nicholas, was built about 1200 added to over the centuries and restored in 1889 when a series of wall paintings was discovered under a crust of whitewash. The earliest date from the 13 th century.

The Second World War changed Little Horwood from a quiet rural community to one bustling with crowds of strangers for an airfield was made on land lying between the two Horwoods. It came into use on 3rd September 1942 and from it operated No 26 Operational Training Unit of Bomber Command flying mainly Vickers Armstrong Wellington twin-engined bombers, though many other types of aircraft came and went also. The constant din of aircraft flying low overhead became commonplace and crashes and the death of crews all too frequent. The army was camped at the Manor and prior to D Day, the village was seething with men and machines carrying out manoeuvres on a vast scale.

The airfield ceased operations on January 15 th 1946 and a sudden quiet must have settled again on Little Horwood. To-day the runways and ammunition sheds can still be seen over the fields but the only activity is the grazing of sheep and cattle and the only flights are made by birds.
Life went quietly on; too quietly perhaps. In 1968 some felt that the village was lacking in amenities and much needed improving. There were black spots and very little in the way of entertainment. The village was losing its spirit.
So a newsletter was produced and put through every door. It was a gamble. Deficiencies were pointed out and a scheme was suggested to raise money for the suggested alterations and improvements. The letter ended thus:-
'Because of *ts smallness, the village must pull together or nothing can be achieved. It can only do this if everyone contributes in some way to the maintenance and running of the village, and the people of the community will only do this if their interest is aroused.'

The gamble was successful. The people rallied round. The Little Horwood Social Amenities Association was born and the Entertainments Committee came into being so that all that was wrong has been put right and within the village there is now an active social life.

One of the first achievements of the Social Amenities Association was to buy the school, closed and up for sale. This now houses a flourishing Play Group, the Youth Club, as well as being the Cricket Pavilion and a venue for dances, bazaars, parties etc. The cricket field and playground behind and surrounding it is in the charge of a committee who have recently enlarged and improved the facilities. Sports for the children and pig roasts and a barn dance are some of the activities which take place here. The village hall is used for similar functions, for meetings and for the annual theatrical production staged by the W.I. Shrove Tuesday Pancake races and May Day Celebrations have also been revived by the W.I. and in October there is the Village Race, a cross country event, open to all ages, 2xh miles for the younger men, IVi miles for ladies, children and the not so young. The whole village turns out for this event either to run or just to watch. Several cups are presented and the Crown does a roaring trade. Boxing Day sees a race of a different kind when duck owners bring their birds, complete with knitted colours round their necks, to race in the brook. It is a crazy get-together which raises some money for the recreation ground. Racing of a more serious kind takes place in the spring when two point-to-point meetings are held on Manor Farm land if the weather is not too wet and the clay soil from which the village derives its name does not become waterlogged.

The money raising scheme first suggested in 1968 has continued to this day; weekly payments for those wishing to participate, a weekly draw to determine the winner of the week, and the profits managed by the Trust which allocates money to those organisations in need of it for improvements etc. Quarterly, the Little Horwood News is published, giving news of events, reports of functions, welcoming newcomers and frequently producing items of historical interest.
For the future, though people come and go, it is hoped that the community spirit which makes this village such a good one to live in, will continue.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

 Living in a small village and being the middle child of a family of seven, my childhood was very happy. We all had to work hard, but we had lots of fun too.
We all had to get up at the crack of dawn and were quite ready to go to bed early.

All our drinking water had to be fetched in buckets from a stand pipe in the street. We often had to take a kettle of boiling water to thaw the frozen tap in winter. In the back yard we had a large covered tank and two tubs, which held the very valuable rain water.
Each Wednesday morning very early, all doors and windows were closed, and the village streets were deserted, for this was the day the sanitary cart came round. The wooden closets were right at the bottom of the garden, most of them had two seats, one for adults and a small one for children, so each closet had two buckets to be emptied.

We always kept two pigs in the sty, one for the house and one to sell. The profit made on the one sold, paid for the other.

It was a busy time when the pig was killed. There was all the offal to see to, and the lovely liver, and the fat of which some was always taken round to relatives and friends and then they returned the kindness when they had a pig killed. All the odd pieces of meat were made into big pork pies.
The chitterlings had to be thoroughly cleaned in strong salt water and had to be turned and put into fresh salt water every day for a fortnight. The 'leaf, a large piece of fat, had to be cut into small pieces and put into a large saucepan and melted down to make great bowls of lard. The hard pieces that were left were called scratchings and were delicious with salt and bread.
The sides of bacon and hams were salted in a big 'lead', a large flat dish the size of a big table. Salt had to be rubbed into the meat for several weeks, then the sides of bacon and hams were wrapped in muslin cloth and hung in the kitchen to dry.

On Sunday morning two of us made the long journey right up the village to the bake house, one carrying a huge greased baking tin and large joint and the other a can of batter. Almost everyone in the village took their Sunday joint to be cooked like this. The Yorkshire pudding underneath the meat was just too good to describe.

In the spring we went at night time up the ridings to the edge of the woods to listen to the nightingales. On Good Friday everyone went to the woods to gather primroses to decorate the church and chapel and some for the home. The men spent the day on the allotments setting the early potatoes.

One of the year's loveliest days was May Day. My grandmother had a beautiful garden full of old-fashioned flowers. She used to pick a small bunch for the younger children and the older ones each had a Crown Imperial. We carried these flowers round from door to door singing as we went, all dressed up in our prettiest dresses, with daisy chains for hair bands, necklaces and bracelets.

May Day Song

'A May garland I have brought you
Before your door it stands
It's nothing but a sprout
But it's well spread about
By the work of the Good Lord's hands.
'Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen We wish you happy May We've come to show you our May garland Because it is May Day.'

When anyone in the village died, the church-bell was tolled at once and again before the funeral. All curtains and blinds were drawn over the cottage windows if the funeral procession had to pass by.

K.A. Savage, Little Horwood


Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes


Description of Little Horwood from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Little Horwood, or Horwood Prava, is 1,950 acres; population 448; rateable value, £1,948. The railway between Bletchley Junction and Oxford passes through the parish. Straw plat and bone lace are made here. The village lies 2.5 miles N.E. from Winslow.

Little Horwood is not mentioned in Domesday, but the place is supposed to have been surveyed Winslow. The Manor belonged to the Abbey of St. Albans, and was granted in 1599 to Sir John Fortesque, whose son sold it to Sir George Villers, Knt., afterwards Duke of Buckingham. George, his son the profligate Duke of Buckingham, mortgaged it with his other estates; and when this Duke’s property was sold by the mortgagees, the Horwood Prava estate was purchaces by William Lowndes, Esq., ancestor of the present proprietor, William Selby Lowndes, Esq.

Besides the Lord of the Manor, the other chief proprietors of the soil here are Philip Dauncey, Esq., Miss Weston, and the executors of the late Mr. W. Tuckley.

The Rectory House, situated about one mile from the church, is an ancient and spacious building, now the seat of Philip Dauncey, Esq. It stands on a hill, surrounded by lofty trees, and attached to it are about 400 acres of park-like grounds – remarkable for richness, and used as grazing land. From the dairy here the Royal palaces receive, through the purveyor, a supply of butter, daily. Here too are bred some of the finest, of the description of cows commonly known as the Alderney breed. This house and estate belonged successively to the families of Pigott, Styles, Carter, Adams, and Langston. Mr Dauncey has the impropriation of the great tithes.

A short distance eastward from the church is a decayed mansion, surrounded by a moat, now the farm residence of the Moat Farm. At a part of the villages called Fish End, is an ancient and curious house of brick and wood, in the shape of the letter H, the upper story projecting over the lower part, and having gabled-ends. At Hill Farm is another ancient house having an overhanging upper story. At Wood End is a house similar in style to the Fish-end house; and also one gable of a residence that was formerly inclosed by a wall of red brick with an ornamented coping, a portion of which remains. The parish has been inclosed by an Act of Parliament, passed in 1766, when an allotment of land was assigned to the impropriator of the great tithes, and a corn-rent to the Vicar.

The Living is a Vicarage, in the gift of the Church Patronage Society, and incumbency of the Rev. Thomas B. Holt. It is rated in the King’s Book at £5 6s. 8d., and returned in the Clergy List at £111. The right of presentation has passed through many hands. A few years ago the patron was the Rev. John Bartlett, of Marnwood, Salop. The tithes were commuted in 1849.

The Church (St Nicholas) is an ancient edifice consisting of a square embattled west tower (in which hangs a ring of five bells), a nave, south aisle, and chancel. There are four Early English arches between the nave and the aisle, supported by circular pillars; the aisle is lighted by two three light windows, square-headed; and there are two windows, similar in character in the wall of the nave. The present deal pews were erected in 1830; at the west end is a spacious gallery, put up in 1787; the ancient hagioscope, and a sculptured pedesdal or bracket remain in the aisle; the pulpit is ancient and oak; the font is small and plain; and the ceilings are of plaster. The chancel is small, and lighted by three plain windows. In this part of the church are some high-backed pews. On the north wall are four marble tablets to the memory of Sir Stephen, who was an Alderman of London, purchased an estate here, where he died in 1797. He was High Sheriff of Bucks in 1788 and 1796. The Rev. Stephen Langston, Vicar of this church for 26 years, died 1816.

On the south side of the church-yard is the Vicarage House, “built with framed wood, filled up with bricks, rough-casted, and covered with tiles,” as it is described in a terrier, drawn up in 1810; and as it remains to this day.

At the time of the inclosure of the common lands, in 176, an allotment of 3 acres, 27 perches of arable land was assigned for the repairs of the church, and is known as “Church Land.” This land is at present let for £6 a year.    

 

Education

Little Horwood Parish (Pop. 431)

Two Sunday Schools; one with 34 females; the other, 36 males and 39 females; both supported by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833. 

Long Crendon

Introduction

Long Crendon Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 3461

Easting & Northing: 469208

Grid Ref SP690080 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Long Crendon PARISH St Mary
Crayndon NAMES name for Long Crendon in 1524
Crendendona NAMES name for Long Crendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Long Crindon NAMES name for Long Crendon in 1626
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1853
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Meeting House. First Mentioned: 1799. Built 1828, rebuilt 1854
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1854
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840. Built 1866
Easington PLACE within the parish
Notley PLACE within the parish
Tittershall PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 991
1811 989
1821 1212
1831 1382
1841 1656
1851 1700
1861 1570
1871 1365
1881 1179
1891 1187
1901 1075
1911 1082
1921 907
1931 978
1941 N/A
1951 1205
1961 1498
1971 1978
1981 2347
1991 2403

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Long Crendon   St Mary   Baptisms   1560   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Long Crendon   St Mary   Marriages   1562   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Long Crendon   St Mary   Burials   1559   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WEST SHRIMPTON SHRIMPTON SHRIMPTON
2 BURT WEST DODWELL ING
3 BURNHAM CARTER ING DODWELL
4 CANNON CANNON WARNER TURNER
5 TURNER RANDOLPH TURNER WEST
6 BURNAM GIBSON EDWARDS CANNON
7 GREENING COX BUCKLE WARNER
8 BUTLER TOWERSEY SAWYER CROOK
9 HEARNE FRYER CROOK TOWERSEY
10 TOWERSIE WINTER BRISCOE EDWARDS

 

Notes

Long Crendon was originally called Creodun, a Saxon word meaning Creoda's Hill, Creoda being the son of Cedric, or Cerdic, the first king of the West Saxons. A large village two miles north of Thame, it came into prominence towards the end of the 16th century with its needlemaking industry. Lacemaking likewise was one of its crafts, having been brought into Buckinghamshire villages by foreign refugees as early as the 16th century. It provided work for a large proportion of the women and girls, some of them learning even from the age of five.
Its long meandering main street, bounded at one end by the impressive 14th century grey limestone church, and at the other end by the Churchill Arms, is picturesque with its colour-washed houses and cottages, mostly of the 17th century.

Long Crendon's oldest inn, also in the main street, is the Eight Bells, situated towards the church end and close to the famous old Courthouse. These buildings fairly come alive each year in springtime when a group of dedicated people, old and young, come together in order to re-enact a selection from the York Cycle of Mystery plays in and around our lovely floodlit church. Then, for a memorable week, are you likely to come across all manner of colourfully-attired medieval characters as they emerge from alley and doorway! Ruth Pitter, poet and much-loved local celebrity, has been closely connected with these annual performances, now in their 16th year, and did indeed modify some of the original text.

Long Crendon, in common with many another village, seems to have had its fair share of ghosts! There was the poltergeist believed to have haunted the Courthouse, the galloping horseman of Lower End, an unhappy little lady in much the same area whose soul is now said to be shut up in a salt box buried in a chimney wall at The Mound, and the inevitable woman in grey who is said to haunt the church. She, like the rest of them, is 'friendly and harmless, and glides away to keep her secret'.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Long Crendon from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Crendon of Long Crendon, is separated by the river Thame from Aylesbury Hundred on the west, and Oxfordshire on the south. Its area, according to the Parliamentary Return is 3,120 acres. Lipscomb states that “Crendon township contains about 3,063 acres, Notley about 725 acres, and a detached portion of the parish called Tittershall Wood 110 acres; in all 3,448 acres.” The present number of the population is 1,570; and is 3,448 acres.” The place is supposed to have derived its name from a Green hill on which it is situated; and its prefix as a distinction Grendon Underwood. The soil is chiefly a stiff pale clay.

The village, which is about a mile in length, is situated 2 miles N. by W. from Thame, and nine miles S.W. from Aylesbury. About one hundred persons are employed here in the manufacture of needles, and lace making is also carried on here to a considerable extent.

Education

Long Crendon Parish (Pop. 1,382)

Five Daily Schools (commenced since 1818),in which 50 males and 36 females are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, in one, supported by voluntary contributions, are 45 children of both sexes, who attend the Established Church; the other appertains to Baptists, and consists of 185 children, conducted by gratuitous teachers.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

 

 

Ludgershall

Introduction

Ludgershall Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2823

Easting & Northing: 466217

Grid Ref SP660170 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ludgershall PARISH St Mary
Lotegarser NAMES name for Ludgershall in Domesday Book ing 1086
Ludgarsell NAMES name for Ludgershall in 1766
Lurdgarsall NAMES name for Ludgershall in 1526
Lurgesall NAMES name for Ludgershall in 1627
Lurgessale NAMES name for Ludgershall in 1509
Lurgosall NAMES name for Ludgershall in 1536
Tetchwich NAMES name for Tetchwick in 1756
Titchwick field NAMES name for Tetchwick in 1674
Tochingewiche NAMES name for Tetchwick in Domesday Book in 1086
Tutchwike NAMES name for Tetchwick in 1570
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1844. Rebuilt 1904
Kingswood PLACE within the parish
Tetchwick PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note Kingswood
1801 37
1811 39
1821 56
1831 61
1841 66
1851 53
1861 54
1871 39
1881 27
1891 40
1901 29
1911 22
1921 24
1931 18
1941 N/A
1951 114
1961 107
1971 89
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Ludgershall   St Mary   Baptisms   1572   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Ludgershall   St Mary   Marriages   1570   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Ludgershall   St Mary   Burials   1566   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SHERLEY LAMBORN FAULKNER JONES
2 MAYO JONES MOLE MOLE
3 TIPPER LEAVER JONES GRIFFIN
4 PAGE HINE GRIFFIN FAULKNER
5 SHORLEY WARD EDMONDS COLES
6 COLEMAN ALLEN COLES LAMBORN
7 COLES GRIFFIN HARRIS EDMONDS
8 WALLINGTON GOODGAME SMITH SMITH
9 HAWKINS WHITE LAMBORN WALLINGTON
10 COLMAN WALLINGTON HUNT GOODGAME

 

 

Description

Description of Ludgershall from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish lies on the borders of Oxfordshire, and includes the hamlets of Tetchwick and and Kingswood. Area, according to the Parliamentary Return, 2,430 acres; population about 500; rateable value £2,506. Lipscomb says that Ludgershall contains mare than 2,000 acres; Kingswood, 254; and Tetchwick, 484; in all, 2,766 acres. The soil is a dark clay, with various loams. Two brooks, springing from Muswell Hill, run N.W. through this parish.

The village is very much scattered, and the greater part of the dwellings are old and covered with thatch. It is distant 6 miles S.E. from Bicester (Oxon), and 13 miles N.W. from Aylesbury.

Lipscomb writes, “Lotegarshale or Ludgar’s-Hall, supposed to have been called from its soil and situation on the verge of a marsh, denominated Otmoor, in Oxfordshire. Kennet thought it ‘seemed to continue the name King Lud,’ to whom tradition assigns a Royal seat in the contiguous parish of Brill; and a little plot of ground near the parsonage-house of Ludgershall, encompassed with a moat, is traditionally pointed out as King Ludd’s Hall.” Later writers, however, seem unwilling to allow the site of a “hall” to be associated with King Lud, in this parish.

The Rectory House, rebuilt shortly after the inclosure of the parish, is separated from the west side of the church-yard by the high road, and is a genteel residence of brick with a tiled roof, surrounded by about six acres of pleasure and garden grounds.

There is a Wesleyan Chapel on the village green, built in 1844; and at the top of the green, on the north side of the church, is the National School, a remarkably neat structure, erected in 1846, at a cost of about £500, contributed chiefly by the present Rector, who also gave the site. The building is of red brick, with Bath stone dressings, and consists of one room 36 feet by 16, and 20 feet high, with a porch, and apartments for the teacher. About 70 children attend. The school is endowed with £20 per annum.

Education

Ludgershall and Tetchworth Parish, with Kingswood Hamlet, (Pop, 585.)

Two Daily Schools (commenced 1832), in which 30 males are educated at the expense of their parents.

Three Sunday Schools, two consist of 55 males and 38 females, who attend the Established Church; the other appertains to Baptist Dissenters, 47 males and 33 females (commenced 1833); all supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.>

Maids Moreton

Introduction

Maids Moreton Parish

Church: St Edmund

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1366

Easting & Northing: 470235

Grid Ref SP700350 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Maids Moreton PARISH St Edmund
Holloweway field NAMES name for Holloway Spinney in 1607
Maid smorton NAMES name for Maids' Moreton in 1584
Maydes Morton NAMES name for Maids' Moreton in 1546
Mortone NAMES name for Moreton in Domesday Book in 1086
Pratchell NAMES name for Page Hill in 1607
Wellmore feeld NAMES name for Wellmore in 1725
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1822
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1869
College (Farm) PLACE within the parish
Holloway Spinney PLACE within the parish
Page Hill PLACE within the parish
Wellmore PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 239
1811 315
1821 407
1831 474
1841 570
1851 573
1861 543
1871 511
1881 448
1891 444
1901 425
1911 371
1921 351
1931 396
1941 N/A
1951 395
1961 389
1971 631
1981 731
1991 842

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Baptisms   1560   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Marriages   1558   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Burials   1563   1892   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ATTWOOD SCOTT KING KING
2 TURPIN PAGE JONES SCOTT
3 WARRE ATTWOOD SCOTT JONES
4 ESTON STEVENS COLTON PAGE
5 DIX KING ANDERSON COLTON
6 BATE SMITH LINFORD ANDERSON
7 SCOTT NEWMAN PAGE SMITH
8 ROBOTHAM MILLER PARGETER LINFORD
9 SHRIEVE HANNAH DANIEL MARRIOTT
10 SPRATLEY GIBBS NICHOLLS ATTWOOD

 

Notes

In the beginning of the reign of King Edward I, the family of Peyvre or Peover, of Toddington (Beds), held a considerable estate in the area and two pious maidens of this family are traditionally stated to have founded the church, thus giving the village its name. Foxcote, the adjoining village had a minute church, now converted to a private dwelling, and is well known because the late Dorian Williams owned the manor house.

Mummers used to come round the village on Boxing Day. The players dressed as clowns and wore odd garments. They carried a black iron frying pan, a club etc. and sang:

'Here come I old Bel Ze Bub,
In my hand I carry a club,
Over my shoulder a dripping pan,
Don't you think I'm a jolly old man?'


This was in 1926 when they were given a few coppers to buy beer. May Day was taken very seriously. Days before, mothers planned what sort of garland they would make for their daughters. Baby chairs, hoops, and crosses were prepared by binding mosses onto a base with twine and kept moistened with water. The evening before, they were decorated with the season's flowers - crown imperials (crown of pearls) were much sought after and were the high point of these artistic creations. Almost every child in the village went May garlanding.

Up to the beginning of the Second World War a baker in Main Street fired his oven (with faggots of wood) every Sunday morning. People brought their family joint of meat which was put on a rack over a roasting tin into which had been poured the batter for the Yorkshire pudding. Sometimes a fruit pie would also be taken later in the morning usually by the husband who would collect the whole meal on his way back from the pub later and taken home where the cooked vegetables were waiting.

There have been several 'characters' in Maids Moreton. One was Madam Morney, a member by marriage of the French perfumers. She bought the Old Manor House opposite the Buckingham Arms in the 1930s. She gave a lot of work to builders in Buckingham and men who were unemployed in the village. She had a herd of Jersey cows and sold the cream at 6d for about ozs. A Q.C. Stewart Bevan lived with her causing great speculation amongst villagers — she being French!
Another character was Dick Jones, alias Captain Starlight who on returning from the First World War, had to leave his mother's terraced cottage in Batchelors Row when she died. He dug a pit in a field near Chackmore Farm, thatched it with straw, dug steps in the earth at the entrance, and lived there on bags of straw until his death. As his nickname suggests he was very knowledgeable about the stars.

In the 1930s there was much poverty, although folk were too proud to let it be known. When the blackberries and mushrooms were ready, the women rose early, got the children off to school, quickly did their housework and went off to gather blackberries and fungi. 'Blackberry Jack' always appeared with the same intentions and was very abusive if the women went near where he was gathering. Mr Busby, a greengrocer, came by trap from Buckingham each day and bought the berries (to make dye or jam) and the mushrooms for a few coppers per pound.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Maids’ Moreton from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish contains 1,240 acres, and 543 souls. Its rateable value is £1,880. The soil is clayey, alternated with gravel. The river Ouse bounds the parish on the east, and a branch of the Grand Junction Canal passes through it. The name of the place is derived from its locality being originally a moor; and the prefix from two maiden sisters of the Peyvre family, who built the church.

The village is distant 1.5 mile N. E. from Buckingham.

The school is a neat red brick building erected chiefly by the Rector, in 1854. From 60 to 80 children attend.

Charities In 1743 John Snart, gentleman, gave £100 to the poor of this parish, the interest or produce of the same to be given in bread to such of the poor on Sundays “as shall come constantly to church.” This sum was expended in the purchase of £158 2s. 6d. stock, three per cent. consols.

William Scott, by will dated about the year 1800 left £100, the interest to be applied in apprenticing poor children of this parish. With this sum £164 3s. 9d. three per cent. consols has been purchased.

Education

Maids Moreton Parish (Pop. 474)

One Daily School, containing 20 males and 20 females.

Two Sunday Schools, 37 males and 32 females; supported by the Rector, the Rev. James Long Long.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Marsh Gibbon

Introduction

Marsh Gibbon Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 2818

Easting & Northing: 464223

Grid Ref SP640230 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Marsh Gibbon PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Black Bretch NAMES name for Black Breach in 1674
Gubbons Hole NAMES name for Rhon Hill in 1670
Marsh Gibbyon NAMES name for Marsh Gibbon in 16th C
Marsh Gibwen NAMES name for Marsh Gibbon in 1806
Marsh Gubbyon NAMES name for Marsh Gibbon in 16th C
Merse NAMES name for Marsh Gibbon in Domesday Book in 1086
Ranell NAMES name for Rhon Hill in 1670
Ranhill NAMES name for Rhon Hill in 1674
Rannell NAMES name for Rhon Hill in 1674
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1853
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1822
Black Breach PLACE within the parish, now lost
Gubbins Hole PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 534
1811 626
1821 738
1831 812
1841 863
1851 944
1861 858
1871 876
1881 743
1891 696
1901 598
1911 587
1921 521
1931 490
1941 N/A
1951 510
1961 545
1971 724
1981 820
1991 853

There was no census in 1941.

{tsb Records}

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Marsh Gibbon   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1576   1843   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsh Gibbon   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1577   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsh Gibbon   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1577   1924   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PARKER PARKER PARKER PARKER
2 NEWMAN CLARKE JONES RAWLINS
3 CLARKE HICKS RAWLINS JONES
4 TOMKINS SPIER GOUGH WHITE
5 MASON RAWLINS TOMPKINS GOUGH
6 MILLER MASON HERITAGE TOMPKINS
7 WHITE JONES HERRING HERITAGE
8 THORNTON WHITE WHITE CLARKE
9 LADYMAN SCOTT ALLEN ALLEN
10 KINGHAM NEWMAN BURGESS SMITH

 

Notes

Most of the farms and stone terraced cottages are owned by the Ewelme Charity Trust, and the rents help provide for 13 poor men and two chaplains at Ewelme in Oxfordshire.

The Greyhound Friendly Society was formed in 1777 as a sick club. Today it has about 160 members and a 'Feast' is organised at the Village Hall following the parade to church with the Marsh Gibbon Silver Band leading the procession. The band celebrated its 80th anniversary in 1986.

The Parish Church of St Mary's dates from Norman times and the lovely old manor house stands nearby. Westbury Manor is situated near a moat in the centre of the village and Oliver Cromwell is said to have stayed at Cromwell House on his way to the Battle of Edge Hill.

The village has changed over recent years with small developments taking place. The new inhabitants have fitted into the way of life extremely well, many commuting to Oxford, London, Banbury, Thame, Aylesbury and Milton Keynes from here. In 1971—72 and 73 the villagers organised three successful steam rallies which helped raise enough money to build a new Village Hall which was opened in 1976.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

At the turn of the century Marsh Gibbon was noted for its large proportion of thatched cottages and barns, and most of the farm workers of the village could thatch.
House thatching was a business of its own as carried on by the Carter family and this was their only means of earning a living. The straw was supplied by local farmers, as was the willow used for making sprays and pegs. This craft was very skilled and the Carters travelled on foot to neighbouring villages and borrowed ladders from the farmers for their own use.

The process involved was that the straw of the best wheat was shaken out into a heap and wetted, yealmed into bundles to take up the ladder, laid on the roof (working from the bottom upwards) until they had completed a 'stolch' or strip, then it was pegged on, working from right to left across one side of the roof. If a good straw was used and the work well done a thatched roof has been known to last thirty years, but the normal length would be twenty years. The main part of the houses nowadays are covered with wire netting to protect the thatch from birds. Mr Owen Carter, now retired and living in the village, gave me details of prices his father charged. They were rather staggering, 4s 6d to 5s 6d per hundred square feet of roof.
As a farmer's daughter, I recall trips to the corn fields in the summer when the corn was being cut with the binder into sheaves, then shocked into stooks to dry out before being carried on horse-drawn wagons and made into a rick in readiness for threshing in the winter months. Some of my father's straw has been used to thatch houses in this village.

Eileen Chambers, Marsh Gibbon

My father-in-law, now ninety-two, has a few tales to tell. In the school holidays he was given 1 d per week and sent to a little cottage school which only held about ten children. The wives in those days were busy with the lace pillows to earn a few extra pence and they often started the day with a hymn they chose at the school. Because it was a favourite 'Now the day is over' was often sung! Those who reached Standard IV at the age of twelve were allowed to leave school. A few coppers were to be earned in fields in the evenings towards dusk. The farmers in those days were worried about the amount of sparrows and the harm they did, so a sparrow club was formed and some nets bought. The boys were paid one penny per dead bird. Older people say that sparrows' breasts were nice in a pie! The days of a farm worker before the First World War were very long. In summertime they worked from 4 am until at least 7 pm. The wives thought nothing of taking them food to the fields twice in a day. They were allowed the chunky, pieces of wood when hedgecutting, so bought very little coal. Many of the women spent long hours in the harvest fields picking up the  odd ears of wheat. Most of them kept chickens and were glad of the corn. Almost all the families had a pig or two in the sty and grew their own vegetables and fruit. On the very large allotment field, many had a little patch of corn sowed each year and a young man ploughed it for them for a small charge. There was one threshing day arranged in a barn near by and each one had his corn threshed and they each had their own flour ground for the year. All this seemed to stop around the First World War, and now the field is a patch of Council houses.

I.M. White, Marsh Gibbon

In 1917 I was born in the end farmhouse in Marsh Gibbon where I still live, so by now I really belong there.
We had a mile to walk to school and often arrived late as one attraction was the blacksmith's shop. We hung around the doorway for ages, watching the smithy and his son, clad in leather aprons, one working the large bellows and fire, the other shoeing the horses and moulding the iron work.
Next door to the blacksmith's was the butcher's shop and slaughter-house. On pig-killing days we rushed out of school at midday and whoever got to the butcher's first would claim the bladders. We blew them up and had great fun kicking them like footballs all the way home.
In a nearby field there were some very large pits twenty-five feet deep in places, from which the stones were dug and farm cottages built with them in the village a hundred years ago. People used to come from miles around to swim and fish here. It was here that I and many others learnt to swim in summer and skate in winter.
In the middle of the village is a very strong spring, Stump Well. The water is very soft, and brown with iron. The village was piped so that pressure would send the water to the end of the village and gravity would return it back through the village to provide for six taps. If luck was against you and someone at the farthest taps along the line was drawing water, you would wait for ages.
Our local doctor used nothing but this water to mix his medicines with. To him it was full of healing powers. The well is still here today but barricaded from humans and animals as it is in the middle of a field.
Near to the main road was a field with an open hovel in the centre. It was here that we achieved a tramp who became a permanent member of the village. Where he came from we never knew, or what his end was, but his stay was some thirty years. We called him Billy Wontwork.

Lydia Herring, Marsh Gibbon

At Marsh Gibbon there are wide grass verges on the sides of the roads. Before roads were tarred, the roadsides were wide to enable traffic to pull out of the ruts that formed in the middle of the road in wet weather. After tarring, these verges were used for grazing and making hay. Right up to the 1930's, at Marsh Gibbon the Parish Council auctioned them for the year. Small farmers were glad to pay £4 or £5 for a couple of miles of roadside where they then grazed cattle with an attendant or cut it for hay. In that village the money so made was given to the parish representative on the Rural District Council towards his expenses.
A great deal of milk went from Bucks on the Oxford-Bletchley railway line to Euston. The milk had to be at the station at 8 am—some thirty horses and carts converged on the station at Marsh Gibbon before the 1914-18 war.
The cows were all milked by hand and the milk all had to be run over a surface cooler before going to the station, and sometimes there was a dash to get there on time. The milk was on sale in Euston in the afternoon.
In frosty weather the pony had to be driven very carefully. The blacksmith would put longer nails in the horse's shoes to give a grip. These wore down quickly, and if the frost lasted more than six or seven days they would have to be done again.
Mr Batchelor remembers cutting corn with a scythe and then using a hook and a left-handed iron hook to make it into sheaves that were tied by hand with straw.
Later they had a 'Sailer', a two-horse drawn implement that cut the com, which fell back onto the platform behind and some sails swung round and threw the corn loose in a sheaf onto the ground. This was tied by hand. Beans were not tied.
Later they had a binder drawn by three horses which cut and tied the sheaves. In the 1939-45 war one of these was converted to use with a tractor. Before it started in a field, one width had to be cut by hand all round so that it did not run over standing corn.
If the builder of a hay or corn rick was not very skilled the rick might lean and it would then have to be propped up with wooden stakes. These stakes were known as 'policemen'. A neighbour might comment, 'I see you've got a policeman up at your rick so's it won't run away'.
.Quite a lot of hay was made for sale, much of it for the horses in London. This hay was 'trussed'. The trusser did this job throughout the year, moving his truss from farm to farm as required. He then used a knife to cut out slabs of hay. This was put in the trusser and a handle pulled down to press it tightly and tie string round.
Trussing was no longer necessary when hay was baled in the field in the 1940s.

Percy Batchelor (born 1895)

My home was in a huddle of houses surrounded by fields, except on one side where a canal and wide expanse of railway kept the town at bay. We had many more shops than most villages. Just over the canal bridge was the 'local', it was a good idea to give this a wide berth at turning-out time on Saturday night, or risk being bowled over by a lurching drunk. Opposite this was a power station, where gas was extracted from coal, turning it into coke.
Over the bridge was first a paper, tobacco and sweet shop. Next, a fish and chip shop where one could get 'a penny and pennorth'—a penny piece of fish and a scoop of potatoes, with vinegar and salt thrown in if wanted. A couple of houses separated that from the greengrocer's. Oranges cost four a penny, apples 1 or 2 lb a penny, according to the season, and a bag of mixed herbs (onions, carrots and turnips) only a few pence. At the grocer's shop there was rice, sugar, split peas, lentils etc. in sacks on the floor. These were sold in a wrapping of stiff blue paper screwed into a cone. On some occasions a rice pudding had to be skimmed before being put in the oven, or one got sacking hairs with it.
Next came the oil shop, where they sold fire-wood, candles, gas mantles, fire lighters and some hardware, besides paraffin.
Beyond the draper's shop about a dozen houses continued on, one of which was a barber's shop and had a striped pole standing out beside the door; and then, of all things, a coffee shop.
Across the other side of a cul-de-sac was a 'snob', or shoe-maker, and we were allowed to go in and watch him at his work, though he used to chase small boys away. He also renewed rubber heels, which were disks held in place by a screw. When worn at one edge, the disk could be turned, so that the worn edge was the other side of the shoe.
Quite a bit further down the road was another tobacco, sweet and paper shop where we could get 4 oz of sweet crumbs for a farthing. These were the bits of any kind of sweet left in the jars or boxes when they were otherwise empty.
Across another side road was a grocer's and off-licence. Here there were boxes of biscuits along the front of the counter with their tops off to show their contents. Then the 'milk shop' where they sold all kinds of dairy produce, and a very large earthenware bowl took up a good part of the counter. This was glazed, and white, with a picture of a cow in blue, with a sort of wreath of leaves round it. Customers took their own receptacle into which the milk was measured with one or half pint measures.
The last shop was a bakery, with lovely smells issuing.
A few more houses, then fields and more fields and on the nearest of these one of the first cottage homes for orphans was built.
In our nearest shopping centre was the Jubilee Clock, where on 'Hogmanay' Scotsmen, brought down to man the new McVitie & Price's factory, gathered to drink, dance and sing the old year out.
The baker brought our bread in a horse-drawn cart When he had gone by we looked up the road for manure, and if the horse had obliged ran out with bucket and shovel, for we had a small flower garden at the back of the house. Most people kept rabbits, chickens or pigeons.
Downstairs our house was gas lit, but we had to use candles upstairs. My brothers and father were all over six feet tall, so we had to keep a good supply of mantles in the house. The street was also gas lit, and at dusk the lamplighter came down the road carrying a cane with a hook at the end which he used to turn on the gas.
The milkman called round the village with a brass ornamental churn slung between two wheels. Horizontal bars held the measuring cans which were of a lead-like metal with flat brass hooks for the dual purpose of handles and to hold them on to the bar. We put lidded cans of the same lead-like metal on to the front step, and he filled them as he passed. The rag and bone man with his cry of 'Rag'ne a bone, bottle a bone', used a coster's barrow, as did the Hokey Pokey man Who called 'Okey Pokey penny a lump'.
The canal came into my life. The playground of the infants' school overlooked it, with iron railings shutting it off. One teacher here would let us go out to watch the barges go by if we put our hands up in time. We always looked into the tiny cabin to see how much shining copper and brass they had, and often sparkling glass. Occasionally we would see a mirror framed in flowers painted on to the glass. The half door, and outer walls too, were usually brightly painted with all kinds of scenes and designs and the horses' harness shone with dangling brasses.

Anonymous, Marsh Gibbon

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Description

Description of Marsh Gibbon from J. J. Sheahan in 1861.

The parish of Marsh Gibbon or Mershe Gibwen, lies on the border of Oxfordshire, and contains 2,752 acres, and 858 inhabitants. Rateable value of £4,461. The Buckinghamshire Railway passes through the parish. Marsh Gibbon derives its name from its situation in a marsh; and a family anciently proprietors or lessees of these lands. The village is a mile in length, the church and a school being near its centre. Until within a mile in length, the church and school being near its centre. Until within a recent period the roads were hardly passable during the winter months. The place is distant from Bicester 4.5 miles E. by N., and 9 miles S.W. from Buckingham. Little Marsh is a detached portion of the village. Pillow lace is made here by females. The waste lands were inclosed under an Act of Parliament passed in 1841. 

There are many landowners in this parish, among which are George Croke, Esq., (lessee under Ewelme Hospital), and Messers, T. Hickman, J. Jones, John Holt, Richard Ivans, J. Mason, S. May, M. Parker, and W. Coles.

The Manor House, situated on the south side of the church, is a large gabled building of stone, in the Domestic Gothic Style, with mullioned windows, and red brick chimney shafts. Three of the rooms contain some ancient tapestry in good preservation, most of the subjects being of a scriptural character. Lipscomb calls this the “Old Manor-house of Crokes,” and states that “soon after the death of Alexander Croke, Esq., in 1757, it was converted into a farmhouse,” The house is engraved in Lipscomb, and is now in the occupation in the occupation of Mr. John Templer, farmer. At the back, or west side of the building are some fine old yew trees. 

The Westbury Manor House is situated at the west end of the village, and at present is the residence of Mr. Richard Ivens. In a field called the Grove, on the south side of the house, are two ponds or small lakes, in the centre of one of which there is a small island. In this locality are traces of an ancient entrenchment.

West of the church are the remains of embankments, “supposed,” according to Lysons’, “to have been thrown up by the Parliamentary army, when they marched Marsh Gibwen, in the month of June, 1645.”

The Living is a Rectory in the patronage of the Bishop of Oxford and incumbency of the Rev. Thomas Huntley Green. It is valued in the King’s Books at £21 9s. 4.5d. The tithes were commuted for £500, and there are 127 acres of glebe land. After the suppression of the Grestein Monastery the advowson was given to the De la Poles, and upon their attainder was escheated to the Crown, in which it continued until about 1853, when it was granted to the Bishop of Oxford.

The Rectory House, built in 1846, is a handsome Elizabethan structure of red brick with Bath stone dressings. It is surrounded by five acres of garden, pleasure grounds, &c.

The Independent Chapel, situated on the Launton Road, was erected in 1853. The Rev. Edwin Green is pastor.

The National School is a neat building in the vicinity of the church. In 1847, the late Mrs. Shephard left £35 per annum for the support of it. Upwards of 100 children attend.

About 200 yards north of the church is a Mineral Spring called “Stomp Well.” The ground about here abounds with the fossil shells of marine productions.

The rent of five acres of land at Piddington (Oxon), is expended in apprenticing poor children of this parish. The donor of this charity is unknown. At the inclosure, ten acres were allotted to the poor in lieu of common rights.

Education

Marsh Gibbon Parish (Pop, 812)

Two Sunday Schools (commenced since 1818); one supported by the Rector and Curate, is attended by 50 males and 80 females, the other maintained by Independent Dissenters, consisting of about 50 children of both sexes.

There are Schools wherein females are taught lace-making, and occasionally to read, but they, like the Sunday Schools, afford but scanty means of instruction, and a daily School is greatly needed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Marsworth

Introduction

Marsworth Parish

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Berkhampstead

Size (acres): 1266

Easting & Northing: 492214

Grid Ref SP920140 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Marsworth PARISH All Saints
Missevorde NAMES name for Marsworth in Domesday Book in 1086
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 259
1811 264
1821 391
1831 427
1841 484
1851 479
1861 549
1871 564
1881 455
1891 385
1901 396
1911 384
1921 316
1931 323
1941 N/A
1951 897
1961 570
1971 506
1981 656
1991 693

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Marsworth   All Saints   Baptisms   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsworth   All Saints   Marriages   1591   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsworth   All Saints   Burials   1575   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SEARE SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 WEST NORWOOD CHAPPIN CHAPPIN
3 TURNEY GREENING BATES SEARE
4 GURNEY ALLEN GREGORY BATES
5 IVES WADE EDWARDS GREGORY
6 WHITCHURCH WEST FIGG NORWOOD
7 NORWOOD STEVENS ROWLAND GREENING
8 HODSON FIELD SAUNDERS EDWARDS
9 GEARY SEARE BRANDOM ROWLAND
10 ALLEN ROWLAND GREENING FIGG

 

Notes

The Grand Union Canal runs through Marsworth with an arm of the canal going off to Aylesbury. The village is surrounded by farming country and was part of Lord Rosebery's estate. In the 1800s it had its own hospital but this was demolished in 1894 and the land is now known as Hospital Farm.


An elderly resident remembers trains on a branch of the railway line to Aylesbury, stopping at Marston Gate, just outside the village to pick up milk brought in from the surrounding farms for the Nestles milk factory at Aylesbury.
The canal was very busy at the beginning of this century. Boats carried everything but mostly coal, sand and wheat. In 1916 it was frozen over for six weeks and there was no movement of traffic at all with boats frozen in by the ice.

In the Second World War Marsworth became part of an airfield. The R.A.F. were there at the beginning of the war, flying Wellington bombers. They were followed by 4,000 American airmen who flew Fortresses and Liberators. A leaflet squadron was based there. The camp was a big one with a hospital, dining hall seating over a 1000, and a theatre. The stage from the theatre was later put in the village hall.

There was also an underground command post on the airfield. It was reported to be as big as a good sized bungalow and to be bomb-proof. It was kept well stocked with food and water at all times. Churchill was a regular visitor particularly towards the end of the war. He used to land there on his way to Chequers.

General Patten also visited Marsworth and decorated some of the American airmen during a service held at the camp.

Although Marsworth has grown since those war-time years it is still a very happy and friendly place to live.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Description

Description of Marsworth from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Marsworth, or Masworth parish, lies on the edge of the county adjoining Hertfordshire. The acreage is about 1,200, and the population is 463. The land is very good, chiefly arable. The Grand Junction Canal passes through the parish, from north to south, occupying 42 acres 2 roods; and here is a very large reservoir for the use of the canal, which, when full, looks like a small lake. From Marsworth, a small branch of this canal diverges to Aylesbury. The London and North Western Railway extends along 1 mile, 4 chains 48 links, through the parish. The rateable value of the entire parish is £3,347.

The village, which is situated 2 miles N. from Tring, 2.5 S.W. from Ivinghoe, and 6.5 miles E. from Aylesbury, is tolerably compact, and the houses are chiefly in the vicinity of the church. Stanhope’s End is a detached portion, consisting of about 20 neat cottages, and a steam flour mill, about a quarter of a mile south from the church, near the banks of the canal.

The Icknield Way which intersects this county in a south-westerly direction – entering it from Dunstable (its point of Junction with Watling Street) – passes through the south-east portion of Marsworth parish, and continues its course by Wendover, Risborough, Horsendon, until it enters Oxfordshire, at Bledlow.

The Vicarage House, erected in 1848, is a genteel residence, situated a short distance from the church, on its south-side.

The Baptist Chapel is a small red brick building. The school is attended by about 30 boys daily. The building is of white brick, small, and neat, with a clock and a dial in front.

Education

Marsworth Parish (Pop. 427)

One Sunday School, with 25 children of both sexes; supported by the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Mentmore

Introduction

Mentmore Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 1575

Easting & Northing: 490219

Grid Ref SP900190 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Mentmore PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Leborne NAMES name for Ledburn in 1626
Leburne NAMES name for Ledburn in 1641
Lyburne Green NAMES name for Ledburn in 1766
Mentemore NAMES name for Mentmore in Domesday Book in 1086
Ridborrowe ffeilde NAMES name for Redborough in 1766
Roughden NAMES name for Rowden in 1766
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Ledburn. First Mentioned: 1840
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840
Ledburn PLACE within the parish
Redborough (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Rowden (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Mentmore   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1575   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Mentmore   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1575   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Mentmore   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1600   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 THEEDE THEED VARNEY VARNEY
2 WIGGE MEAD ROGERS FOUNTAIN
3 WIGG FOUNTAIN MERCY ROGERS
4 JANE SMITH WILLIS SAYELL
5 THEED CHAPMAN FOUNTAIN WILLIS
6 STEEVENS MATTHEWS SAYELL THEED
7 TARBOX SAYELL KENT MERCY
8 WALKER KNIGHT BUCKMASTER MEAD
9 DAVERS LONDON BAKER SMITH
10 PITKIN BAMPTON GRUBB BUCKMASTER

 

Notes

Rebuilt by Baron de Rothschild on completion of Mentmore Towers in the latter half of the 19th century, Mentmore is a pretty village with its mock Tudor houses set on top of a hill. The large village green is surrounded by splendid lime trees, and the views in all directions are quite breathtaking.

The church built in the 13th century is set on the highest point in the village with its 15th century tower as a landmark for miles around. It has over the centuries been added to and altered by various builders.

The dominant feature of the village was Mentmore Towers. Baron de Rothschild commissioned George Stokes to design the house, and the building was supervised by Stokes' father Joseph Paxton, who also designed the Crystal Palace. Work began in 1852, and on its completion Mayer Amschel Rothschild had the village of Mentmore rebuilt nearer to the gates of the Towers. No excuse for being late for work then! He also had stables and kennels for the stag hounds built.

Nearly everyone who lived in the village and the nearby villages of Crafton and Ledburn were employed in some capacity on the estate, in the studs, or gardens, the house, or management of the estate. There were very large gardens, with many greenhouses, and hothouses, for the estate was fully self supporting. When the last head gardener arrived, there were 44 full time gardeners. There were at least 10 laundry maids and dairy maids. The dairy was situated on the bend at the bottom of Stag Hill. It is now used as a smallholding.

The unmarried men lived in the Bothy, and there was similar accommodation for the grooms and trainers at Ledburn. Today this is the Hare and Hounds Inn.
One of the most interesting features of Mentmore were the Studs, for many famous racehorses were bred there, including winners of the Derby and the St Leger.

On the death of Baron de Rothschild the estate was inherited by his daughter Hannah. In 1878 she married the fifth Earl of Rosebery who later became Prime Minister. The Roseberys were a very sporting family and continued breeding racehorses right through to the present Earl's father.

When Lord Rosebery died in 1974, Mentmore Towers was offered to the Government of the day for 3 million pounds lock stock and barrel. There was quite a furore when it was turned down. The auction of the house and contents conducted by Sothebys caused much excitement. People came from all over the world to view and buy. The final sum realized was 6 million pounds, unfortunately many of the treasures were taken out of the country.

The Towers was finally sold to, and used as a conference centre for the followers of the Transcendantal Meditation Cult, and in the village as the houses become vacant they are sold off privately. The end of one Era and perhaps the beginning of another.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Mentmore from J. J. Sheahan, 1861

This parish, including the hamlet of Ledburn, contains 1,240 acres, and 399 persons; and its rateable value is £5,225. It is intersected by the London and North Western Railway. The Village, which is distant 8 miles N. E. from Aylesbury, 3.5 S. of Leighton Buzzard, and 1.5 N. W. from Cheddington Station of the before-mentioned railway, is situated on a hill which rises somewhat abruptly from the Vale of Aylesbury. This hill is of irregular shape, throwing out three spurs; one of which, stretching to the westward, stands the church; and along another, towards the north-east is the road to Leighton Buzzard. The houses which compose the village are irregularly scattered around a large green.

The manor and the principle estate were purchased a few years ago from Captain Harcourt, of St Leonard's Hill, near Windsor, by Baron Mayer Armschel de Rothschild, who commenced the erection of a magnificent mansion here in 1851.

This Palatial Residence of Baron de Rothschild introduces a new style of domestic architecture into Buckinghamshire. The designs for the building was supplied by Sir Joseph Paxton, Knt., M.P., and his son-in-law, Mr. George Henry Stokes, architect; and Mr. George Myers, of London, was the builder. A ground plan, and a view of this stately and splendid pile – this “many towered mansion” appears in The Builder newspaper of December 19th 1857 – together with the following description: -

The style adopted by desire of the Baron for the exterior is that which prevailed during the early part of the reign of King James I., and of which Wollaton Hall, Notts, is perhaps the finest example. A difference in the combination and arrangement has contributed to produce grouping of a picturesque character and outline, and the details and ornamentation are understood to be the result of a careful study and examination of the works of John of Padua. The mansion is built entirely of Ancaster stone, of fine quality and colour; the cornices are highly enriched; and the frieze of each order is filled in with in carved panels and heads.

The approach to the mansion is by a court, flanked on one side by the wall of the conservatory, and on the other side by the screen wall of the servant’s offices. Niches are formed in each of these walls, for the reception of statues. The entrance-porch is of sufficient width to admit of carriages passing through, and has a groined stone-ceiling elaborately carved. From the sub-hall, which is lined with Caen stone, and paved with Sicilian and Rough Royal marbles, a flight of marble steps leads to the arched corridor, which forms means of communication between the suite of apartments on the ground-floor and offices. The grand hall is about 48 feet by 40 feet, and 40 feet high, and is separated from the sub hall by the corridor just mentioned. At this end of the hall are inserted three arches, the whole height of the ground floor, filled with polished plate-glass. The entrance to the interior is through the centre arch which forms a doorway. At the level of the chamber-floor the grand hall is surrounded by corridors, and an open arcade of great beauty and richness; each arch of which is filled with a balustrade of alabaster and green marble. This arcade, with its richly-moulded arches, carving, and ornaments, is striking and effective, and imparts both character and variety to the interior. Immediately above the arcade is the main cornice, from which spring the coved ceiling and walnut ribs, which divide it into compartments; stone heads carved by Monti, are placed in the frize beneath each rib, and the compartments of the coved ceiling are filled with ornamental shields, scrolls and foliage.

The Baron’s Stud Farm is in the adjoining hamlet of Crafton, parish of Wing. The house, which is in the cottage ornee style, and is very neat, is built of red brick, with darker brick dressings. Adjoining the house are four yards or quadrangles lined with stables, loose boxes for stallions, and breeding-mares and their young. The premises are altogether a model of order and regularity, and are frequently visited by many noblemen and gentlemen interested in the national sport of horse-racing. Mr Charles Markham is the stud-groom and manger. This noted breeding establishment was formed in 1853, upon the site of an old farm dwelling.

The hamlet of Ledburn or Ledbourne, is about two miles north from Mentmore village, and consists of several detached houses, extending along one side of about half a mile of the road leading from Wingrave to Leighton Buzzard. Most of the houses are very old. One is particularly remarkable, with gable ends, and the upper part resting upon strong projecting oak beams, considerably overhanging the lower story. One of the upper rooms is formed of oak panelling, with pilasters, and a richly carved cornice, and contains a beautifully carved mantel piece of oak. Close to the fire-place is an arched doorway, which retains an ancient door with curiously formed steel hinges; and the house contains several small oddly shaped apartments. The old building, which was once of importance, is now unoccupied, and is shortly to be razed. A short distance from this house is another old farm dwelling which has an air of interest about it. Two doors belonging to the out-buildings have the appearance of having once belonged to some ecclesiastical edifice; they are of oak, with large iron headed and thickly studded projecting nails, curiously wrought hinges, and highly embellished handle plates of singular formation. The house and the farm connected with it has been in the occupation of the Freeman family for a considerable number of years.

The Vicarage House is a handsome modern building of dark sandstone with Bath stone quoins and dressings. It is in a pleasant situation, and only separated from the churchyard by the main road.

The Wesleyan Chapel is a neat building of white brick, with Bath stone dressings. It is Gothic in style, and has a bell-turret on one of the gables. There is a Baptist Chapel at Ledburn, a small building of red brick.

The School, now temporarily held in a part of Mentmore Cottage, is usually attended by about 70 children. A new school building is about to be erected.

Education

Mentmore Parish, with Ledburn Hamlet (Pop. 329)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information