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Middle Clayton

Introduction

Middle Claydon Parish

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 2640

Easting & Northing: 472225

Grid Ref SP720250 Click to see map 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Middle Claydon PARISH All Saints
Claindone NAMES name for Claydon in the Domesday Book in 1086
Balmore Wood PLACE within the parish
Knowl Hill PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 103
1811 129
1821 160
1831 136
1841 127
1851 165
1861 146
1871 139
1881 225
1891 227
1901 231
1911 257
1921 195
1931 160
1941 N/A
1951 181
1961 177
1971 150
1981 156
1991 123

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Middle Claydon   All Saints   Baptisms   1540   1812   Yes,
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Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Middle Claydon   All Saints   Marriages   1538   1835   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Middle Claydon   All Saints   Burials   1539   1821   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 KING HINTON STEVENS HINTON
2 VERNEY ROADS HINTON ROADS
3 ROADS WEBB ROADS WEBB
4 GIBBS STEVENS WEBB STEVENS
5 HICKS BUTCHER LESTER KING
6 BARTON WELHEAD CROSS VERNEY
7 ROADES LAKE VERNEY BUTCHER
8 MAY MILLER BECKETT HICKS
9 BUTTERFIELD WELLHEAD KING MILLER
10 BUTCHER DANIEL JUDGE GIBBS

 

Notes

Our village has no actual centre as such, but covers a large area, with a population of approximately 150. At one extremity we have Verney Junction, a handful of cottages which once housed railway employees, and a public house. The railway was axed by Beeching in 1967. There is one large house, probably an ex-farmhouse.


Claydon House has been home of the Verney family from the 17th century. It is now a National Trust property, although the Verney family occupy the South Wing. The cobbled courtyard probably looks similar to the days when dairying, laundry and carpentry were carried out. Views from the house over gardens, lawns and fields lead the eye to the three lakes, which years ago supplied the household with fish. Fishing is now confined to clubs, but a great variety of birds breed and dwell among the little islands.

Beside Claydon House stands All Saints church, with its 15th century tower, and painted ceiling in the chancel. High on the East Wall is the Gauntlet of Sir Edmund Verney, King's Standard Bearer, who was killed at the Battle of Edge Hill - his body was never found, only his hand, still clutching the Standard

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Middle Claydon from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

From its situation between East Botolph and Steeple Claydon, this parish is denominated Middle Claydon. Its area is 2,586 acres; population, 146; rateable value, £3,352. It has for part of its border a very ancient vicinal way called Three points Lane. The soil is clayey, intermixed with gravel and sand.

The village is small, but very neat, and lies 4 miles W. S. W. from Winslow, 6 miles from Buckingham, and 8 miles N. N. E. of Aylesbury.

The present mansion, of which the south wing forms part, is a noble structure. It contains several splendid apartments covered with richly carved wood-work, and having fine chimney-pieces. The grand staircase, of mahogany, is inlaid with ebony, ivory, and woods of various colours, and has a richly wrought-iron balustrade representing standing corn (on spiral springs), which bends and rustles as a person ascends. This stair-case is lighted by a beautiful dome, in which there is much rich carved work.

The Benefice is a Rectory, valued in the Liber Regis at £15, and now returned at £540 a year. Patron, Sir Harry Verney, Bart.; Rector, Rev. William Robert Fremantle. The advowson has always been appendant to the possession of the manor. The tithes were commuted about twenty-five years ago. The Rector of Middle Claydon holds likewise the united benefice of East and Steeple Claydon.

The Rectory House, rebuilt by the patron is 1825, is a large and handsome residence, situated in a part of the grounds of the mansion house, near the road from East Clayton to Steeple Claydon.

The School, built by Sir H. Verney, is close to the village, and is a neat building, now covered with ivy. It includes a residence for the teachers. The average number of boys and girls in attendance is about 90.

 

Education

Middle Claydon Parish (Pop. 136)

One Daily School (commenced 1827), in which are 60 males and 30 females (many from other parishes;) supported by Sir Harry Verney, and penny weekly payments from the children;

Sunday School, for this and the parish of East Claydon, wherein 100 children receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Mursley

Introduction

Mursley Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 2975

Easting & Northing: 481228

Grid Ref SP810280 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Mursley PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Moresley NAMES name for Mursley in 1526
Muresley NAMES name for Mursley in 1766
Mursalai NAMES name for Mursley in Domesday Book in 1086
Murseley NAMES name for Mursley in 1564
Saulden NAMES name for Salden in 1766
Solden NAMES name for Salden in 1760
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1838. Built 1883
Hyde PLACE within the parish, now lost
Salden PLACE within the parish
Salden PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 318
1811 310
1821 473
1831 495
1841 479
1851 553
1861 482
1871 488
1881 363
1891 369
1901 367
1911 383
1921 363
1931 342
1941 N/A
1951 430
1961 402
1971 452
1981 451
1991 425

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1578   1867   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1575   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1578   1898   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GURNEY PITKIN DICKENS DICKENS
2 VARNEY ADAMS BOWLER PITKIN
3 PETTISON STEVENS TURVEY BOWLER
4 COOKE COLLIER LAMBOURNE ADAMS
5 MAYNARD BOWLER SCOTT COLLIER
6 BRAMPTON HARRIS COLLIER STEVENS
7 BAYLEY JAMES WILLIS TURVEY
8 HARRIS WILLIATT LAMBOURN LAMBOURNE
9 ADAMS CLARK COLLYER TURNER
10 HARDING TURNER TURNER SCOTT

 

Description

Description of Mursley from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Mursley-cum-Salden extends over an area of 2,840 acres. Population 481 souls. The soil is clay, gravel and loam. The common lands were inclosed in 1815. The Buckinghamshire Railway passed through the parish, on its north side, occupying 28 acres, 2 roods, 27 perches of land. The rateable value of the parish is £3,721.

The village is large, forming one street of mostly ancient houses, and lies about 3.5 miles N. E. from Winslow, and 1 mile from Swanbourne Railway Station. In that ancient register called Domesday Book, the name of the place is written Muselai.

A weekly Market, on Thursday, at Muresley, was granted in 1230 to the Prior of Snelshall. Warine Fitz-Gerald had another charter for a market on Wednesdays, in 1243, and a Fair on the festival on the festival of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. This charter was renewed to John Duke of Bedford, who had a grant of another fair on the Nativity of Blessed Virgin renewed to Robert Whittingham in 1449. The Rev. Thomas Horn, who exchanged the Rectory of Mursley in 1851, with the late Vicar (Rev. T. K. W. Harries) for the Rectory of Haverfordwest, has written an excellent paper “On the History and Antiquities of Mursley” which is published in the first vol. of the “Bucks Records;” and in that paper Mr Horn says, “How Mursley came to be a market town seems to have been this :- The direct road from Buckingham to Dunstable, and so to London, lay through this place; Mursley and Leighton divided the distance between Buckingham and Dunstable: so that Mursley was well situate for a small market town lying between them. When Aylesbury began to flourish, and the forementioned towns, Buckingham and Dunstable, decayed, the road through Mursley began to be neglected; and so poor Mursley (it is the expression found in Cole’s MSS.) dwindled into a neglected village. To shew the antiquity and comparative consideration of the place” continues the reverend writer, “it is worthy to remark, that Winslow was then of no note, and had no market till five years after Mursley.”

The Rectory House, south-east of the church, is a neat building, very pleasantly situated, with a good southern prospect. In a field adjoining the Rectory garden is apiece of ground moated, most probably the site of an ancient manor-house. The School, in the vicinity of the church, was erected in 1834, and is a neat brick building. About 30 children attend daily.

The Baptist Chapel, at the north of the village, is a small building of brick. The “Church Land” consists of 7 acres 3 roods 1 perch; and 30 acres are let to the poor in small garden allotments.

 

Education

Mursley (with Salden) Parish (Pop. 495)

One Infant School (commenced 1832) consisting of about 40 children, supported by subscription, and small payments from the parents of the children.

Three Sunday Schools; one consists of 40 males, chiefly supported by the Rector; another, 60 females (commenced 1819) supported by a lady; the other is supported by Baptists, and consists of about 30 children of both sexes.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Nash

Introduction

Nash Parish

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1247

Easting & Northing: 478234

Grid Ref SP780340 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Nash PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Nassche NAMES name for Nash in 1520
The Breach NAMES name for Nash Brake in 1825
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1798
Holywell (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Nash Brake PLACE within the parish

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Nash   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1862   1902   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Nash   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1858   1900   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Nash         Nash     1864     1906     Yes     Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 EMERTON KING SMITH SMITH
2 COOKE ILLING FRENCH FRENCH
3 CHAPPELL RAY DUNKLEY KING
4 QUINNEY FRENCH KING DUNKLEY
5 LEE EMERTON COLTON ILLING
6 STEVENS SMITH ILLING HARDING
7 MYSSENDEN PAIN HARDING COLTON
8 COX CLARKE WEATHERHEAD RICHARDSON
9 MALLETT ALDRIDGE RICHARDSON WEATHERHEAD
10 LUDGATE HARDING BRIER PAIN

 

Notes

Nash is a village built on a number of springs and is situated on the outskirts of the new city of Milton Keynes. It has approximately 320 inhabitants.

In the early 1900s water was obtained either from a well in the garden or from the village pumps. There were three pumps and villagers could be seen carrying buckets attached to a yoke around the neck of an older member of the family.
Amateur painters can often be seen with their easels by a small footbridge overlooking the pond by the village green. In the past a woodyard overlooked the green and pond and was well known for miles around. It has gone now and in its place is a riding school with stables and jumps for the horses.

In the early part of the century one of the villagers could almost always be seen in the doorway of her cottage making intricate pillow lace for which Buckinghamshire was so well known.

Modern Nash is home for commuters who work either in London or nearby Milton Keynes.

The village had for many years close association with the members of the Whaddon Chase Hunt which has now been disbanded.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Church

Nash and Whaddon Church History

 

Nash Church
The foundation stone for Nash Church was laid in 1857. The first Rector was Henry Templar who served 1858 - 1860

Well known Architect was G.E.Street 1824 - 1881     Quote  " Nash Church is a small building consisting of Chancel.
Nave,  North Porch and Bell Turret but it has a distinct  period Charm " Unquote.
That is why before 1858 all the people who lived in NASH had to be BAPTISED , MARRIED and BURIED in WHADDON CHURCH before they built the NASH CHURCH.

My connection is my Gt Grandmother Jane Dunkley who married my Grandfather William Mackerness

 

Patricia Harris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description

 

Nash - Description from J.J. Sheahan, 1861

The hamlet of Nash, which contains a small scattered village, 1,430 acres of land, and 462 inhabitants, iloccally situated in the hundred of Cotteslow, 5 miles S. by W. from Stony Stratford, 2.5 miles S.E. from Thornton, and 1 mile W from Whaddon. It was formerly a hamlet in Whaddon Parish but by an Order in Council bearing the date 15th April 1854, it was separated from that parish, and united to the adjoining parish of Thornton (for ecclesiatical purposes only under the name Thornton-cum-Nash. At the cross roads in the village is the base of an old stone cross, and a short distance from it is a Chalybeate Spring, called "Bretch Well." This water never freezes, and will thaw other water in an icy state: during the summer months it is remarkable for its coldness.

The principle proprietors of Nash are the Hon. Frederick Fitzroy, W. S. Lowndes, Esq., Mrs. L. L. Smith, and Mrs Reeves. There is a farn there called Holywell, and a field known as Church-leas.

The Baptist Chapel was erected about 60 years ago, and is a neat building. In the interior is a marble tablet to John King, who died in 1836, aged 81. According to the inscription on this memorial the chapel was built on Mr. King's premises, and he invested £700 "for the support of the Gospel in this his native place."

The National School was built in 1857, from a fund of £200 left for that purpose by the late Mrs. Hart, with assistance from the Committee of Council on Education, and grants from the National Diocesan Societies.

Education

Nash Hamlet (Pop. 377)

Two Sunday Schools, one with 58 children of both sexes, for the support of which the Vicar allows £2 12s. per annum ; the other is maintained by a congregation of Dissenters, and consists of 18 children; both commenced in 1830.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Nether Winchendon

Introduction

Nether Winchendon Parish

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1554

Easting & Northing: 473212

Grid Ref SP730120 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Lower Winchendon PARISH St Nicholas
Nether Winchendon PARISH St Nicholas
Witchende NAMES name for Winchendon in Domesday Book in 1086

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 244
1811 266
1821 284
1831 294
1841 291
1851 284
1861 316
1871 283
1881 257
1891 272
1901 222
1911 208
1921 168
1931 170
1941 N/A
1951 169
1961 143
1971 132
1981 141
1991 137

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1562   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Marriages   1563   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Burials   1563   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PIGOTT SYRED SMITH SMITH
2 NORTH WARNER ORCHARD ORCHARD
3 TYRINGHAM ROSE BLAKE READ
4 HAWKINS READ READ BLAKE
5 BEACHAM DEWBERY MORTIMER MORTIMER
6 POXON GURNEY WATSON WATSON
7 CHILTON LUCAS LAWRENCE WARNER
8 BULL WHEELER WILSON ROSE
9 WOODBRIDGE HORTON SPICER LAWRENCE
10 WALTON COOLING ROSE WILSON

 

Notes

The village is largely unchanged from its 19th century appearance with few modern buildings and many ancient timber-framed houses, and some of the typical local construction of witchert, an unbaked limestone clay mixture. Many retain the ochre colour traditional in the village.

The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book and for many centuries belonged to the Abbey at Notley close by Thame. Some of the cottages still standing are believed to have been lodging houses for the monks.

The church is largely of the decorated period with evidence of earlier origin. The church clock was installed in 1772 by the generosity of Mrs Jane Beresford, Lady of the Manor. It is unusual in having only one hand. The bells were rehung in 1979 and are enthusiastically rung every week. The excellent condition of the church reflects the generosity of the Spencer Bernard family and the efforts of the villagers.

The village passed from the ownership of Notley Abbey at the Dissolution of the Monasteries to the Denny family, part of whose house, it is believed, is incorporated in the Manor Farm House. The seat of the present owners, the Spencer Bernard family is Winchendon House, a pretty Elizabethan manor house with interesting additions from the Gothic revival of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Members of the Spencer Bernard family have been in residence continuously since the late 18th century.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Fred Orchard of Nether Winchendon remembers how the postman walked from Waddesdon,starting at six o'clock in the morning and visiting all the farms on his way, thus considerably lengthening the journey of five miles. After a break lunch, he walked on to Cuddington to meet the pony cart bringing the mail, then back to Winchendon to clear the box at about four o'clock and back to Waddesdon, often in the winter in thick snow which seems to have fallen more frequently in those days.

The village people, with wooden yokes on their shoulders and two buckets, fetched all water from a conduit in the Manor farmyard, or for those on the hill, from a spring half way down. Fred recalls this was his first duty after school, both for his mother and a bedridden neighbour.

There were fifty to sixty children of all ages in the little school, the infants ranged in rows on a gallery. In Upper Winchendon the Rothschilds dressed the girls in red cloaks and round straw hats, and the boys in white jackets, belted and reaching nearly to the knees, and a peaked cap.

The lady living at the Manor Farm started the brass band which later joined with Cuddington to form the Robin Hood Band, so called because Lt. Col. Francis Bernard and Mrs Bernard of Nether Winchendon House provided them with uniforms of Lincoln green—thick green coat and green trousers with a red bib, which later was changed to red collar and cuffs, and a soft felt hat with a feather at one side. They used to play for two days after Christmas, and also at Club feasts and at the flower shows which were held in large tents in a field, and there was great rivalry among the four villages—Nether Winchendon, Cud­dington, Chearsley and Gibraltar. The wives of the bandsmen always sent an Aylesbury duck, dressed and trussed for the table.

Bertha Orchard remembers how in the 1914 war the children were given a holiday to pick blackberries which were weighed at school and then sent to make jam. They also gathered horse-chestnuts which were taken to a local farm to be ground down for cattle feed.

Mr Welford's carrier cart took people to Aylesbury but the journey was so slow that by the time you got there it was nearly time to come home again!

C. Archer, Cuddington

Extracted from ‘A Pattern of Hundreds’(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women’s Institutes

Description

Description of Lower Winchenden from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Nether, or Lower Winchendon contains 1,520 acres, and 284 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,887. The name of Winchendon is derived from the Anglo-Saxon, Wychen, springs, and Don, and eminence. The soil is various. The village is neat, and pleasantly situated in a well wooded valley at the base of the hills from which issue several springs of good water. It is distant from Thame 6 miles N.E., and from Aylesbury 6.5 miles S.W.

In 1649 Thomas Tyringham, Esq., the then possessor of the estate, purchased another estate here from Richard Knollys, Esq., son of Sir Francis Knollys, Knt At the decease of Francis Tyringham, Esq., in 1735, unmarried, his two sisters became heirs. Mary, the surviving sister died in 1745 bequeathing this manor and estate to her cousin Jane, daughter and heir of John Tyringham, Esq., and William Beresford, Esq., of Long Leadingham, Co. Lincoln. This lady died in 1771, leaving all her estates to her maternal cousin-german Sir F. Bernard, Bart., who died and was buried at Aylesbury in 1779. Sir Scrope Bernard, the fourth Baronet, married Harriet, daughter and heir of William Morland, Esq., and took the name of Morland; he was M.P. for Aylesbury, and afterwards for St Mawes; also Under Secretary of State; and died in 1830. His eldest son, William Barnard, Esq., was High Sheriff of Bucks in 1811, and died in 1820; his second son, Thomas, died an infant; his third son succeeded him in the Baronetcy, and also took the name of Morland at his father’s death; and Thomas Tyringham Barnard, Esq., M.P. for Aylesbury, brother to Sir Francis Barnard Morland, Bart., and heir presumptive to the title.

Winchendon Priory is the name now given to the manor or mansion-house which belonged to Notley Abbey. It is the seat of T. T. Bernard, Esq., M.P., and stands southward of the church, on low ground. Sir John Dauncy, a Judge, in the reign of Henry VIII. partly rebuilt it; the Tyringhams improved it about the year 1600; and its present owner has recently expended a large sum upon it. The mansion is battlemented, encloses a small court, and has mullioned windows and ornamental chimney shafts. It contains a good collection of family and other portraits, much stained glass in heraldic and other devices, and many pieces of ancient furniture. Opposite to the front of the house, the main Thame stream is crossed by a small bridge; and on the banks of the river is an ancient water mill. The lawn is diversified with trees, and an avenue of limes of considerable age, forms the approach to the village.

Near the churchyard, on the west side, is a portion of the ancient mansion of the Knolly family, built of timber and brick, with three gables on its south side, and angular chimney shafts. After the death of the last Lady Knollys, the house, with certain lands here passed to the family of Longmire, and from them to the Martyn family. In 1858 the estate was sold by the Martyns to Mr. Thomas Dover, its present owner.

On the Hill Farm the property of Richard Rose, Esq., are three ornamental clumps of trees; and at the extremity of a large pasture called The Grove (belonging to T. T. Bernard, Esq.), are the remains of a moat, within which, doubtless, stood a mansion of which nothing is now known. There is a manor-farm called The Marsh, which belongs to the Duke of Buckingham. This estate was purchased in 1671 by Richard Grenville, Esq., of Wotton. Besides the landowners mentioned, Mr Jonathan Clarke and Mr W. C. Harding have estates here.

There is no Parsonage House, and the school is held in a room attached to the Bear Inn. About 40 children attend.

Education

Nether Winchendon Parish (Pop. 294)

One Daily School, containing 15 males and 12 females (commenced 1823), whose instruction is paid for by their parents;

One Sunday School, of 20 males and 20 females, supported by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Newton Longville

Introduction

Newton Longville Parish

Church: St Faith

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1735

Easting & Northing: 484231

Grid Ref SP840310 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Newton Longville PARISH St Faith
Neutone NAMES name for Newton Longville in Domesday Book in 1086
Newnton NAMES name for Newton in 1526
Ticheforde NAMES name for Tickford End in Bomesday Book in 1086
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Ebernezer Chapel. First Mentioned: 1850
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1830. Rebuilt 1864
Bandland Cottage PLACE within the parish
Tickford End PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 459
1811 486
1821 486
1831 473
1841 565
1851 595
1861 547
1871 537
1881 471
1891 415
1901 424
1911 435
1921 434
1931 472
1941 N/A
1951 601
1961 871
1971 1709
1981 1901
1991 1915

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Newton Longville   St Faith   Baptisms   1560   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Newton Longville   St Faith   Marriages   1560   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Newton Longville   St Faith   Burials   1561   1883   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1873     1902        
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1902     1916        
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1916     1936        
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1936     1958        
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1958     1970        
    Newton Longville         Newton Longville     1970            

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 COOKE WILLISON YOUNG WILLISON
2 COOK HALL PERRY TOMPKINS
3 HAWKINS TOMPKINS TOMPKINS YOUNG
4 TOMPKINS HORNE LINE HORNE
5 BRINKLOW CHILTON HORNE PERRY
6 TOMKINS PAGE DICKENS COOKE
7 HART SMITH WILLISON SMITH
8 WILLIS HART FRENCH HALL
9 KING MATTHEWS ARNOLD DICKENS
10 WILLISON HAWKINS SMITH COOK

 

Notes

Although there is evidence of early occupation the recorded history of the village does not begin until the invasion of England by William the Conqueror. Walter de Giffard had provided ships and had also been the sword arm of the Conqueror. He was given much land which included Newton Longville. Walter de Giffard was the founder member of the abbey of Santa Foy in Longueville in Normandy. Before he died in 1104 he endowed the abbey with his land in Buckinghamshire to his son, also named Walter de Giffard. He was to found an alien priory or cell in Neutone subordinate to the abbey in Longueville on condition that the prior would send monks to Neutone to build a church and teach the inhabitants of the village. The name Longueville was added then. A pension of £l.6.9d was ordered to be paid to the abbey in Longueville by the priory at Neutone. After the suppression of the priory this was paid to New College, Oxford and is paid to the present day.

Our village was once very small. In 1841 there were 110 houses with a population of 475 and 7 ale houses. The industry then was farming with lace making and plait. Now our village is large with a population of about 2,500. We have a flourishing brickyard and because of our nearness to the railway, many villagers are able to commute each day. With this expansion, most of our ancient buildings have gone. We regret losing our blacksmith's shop which was 800 years old. We had a dove cote which was the only timbered one in the county, and old thatched houses, but with progress we now have water from taps instead of pumps and wells, and gas and electricity instead of open fires, street lights and buses. Memories of the old village are sweet and still remain with many old inhabitants.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Newton Longville - Description from J.J Sheahan, 1861.

Newton, Newenton, or Newinton Longville, or Longueville contains 1,718 acres, and 595 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,638. The soil is clay intermixed with course sand. The village is situated 3 miles S.W. from Fenny Stratford. In September 1818, a calamitous and accidental fire broke out here which consumed several cottages; but a liberal subscription was raised for the relief of the distressed thereby occasioned. The parish was inclosed in 1839.


The Rectory House is a commodious resistance of red brick, with extensive red brick, with extensive pleasure-grounds attached. The school is a neat modern building of brick. It is conducted on the national system, and is attended by about 60 children. The Wesleyans and Baptists have each a chapel here.


The poor widows of the parish have a yearly rent-charge of 10s., left by AllenFuller.

Education

Newton Longville Parish (Pop. 473)

One Sunday School, consisting of 38 males and 43 females, supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

North Marston

Introduction

North Marston Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1983

Easting & Northing: 477222

Grid Ref SP770220 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
North Marston PARISH St Mary
Merstone NAMES name for North Marston in Domesday Book in 1086
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1839
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1833. Built 1864

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
North Marston   St Mary   Baptisms   1586   1909   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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North Marston   St Mary   Marriages   1600   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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North Marston   St Mary   Burials   1595   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 INGRAM PRICE PRICE PRICE
2 FOSTER WARD WARD WARD
3 GRACE TATTAM BUCKINGHAM BUCKINGHAM
4 COKER FOSTER TATTAM TATTAM
5 HARTNOLL DENCHFIELD HIGGINS FOSTER
6 SYMONS STEVENS GREGORY WARR
7 WARNER WARR YOUNG COKER
8 CARTER COKER LINNEY LINNEY
9 SYMONDS LAMBORN BAKER WALKER
10 ROBINSON BUCKINGHAM CARTER HIGGINS

 

Notes

In the year 1290 a rector came to take charge of the parish having previously been priest of the parish of Princes Risborough. This man, the now famous Sir John Schorne, was renowned for his extreme piety. He blessed the village well, known to this day as Schorne Well, thus giving it miraculous healing power to all sick people who drank the water. Much ado was made of this so that many came from far and wide to drink from this well. On the summit of Oving, about a mile away where five ways meet, there was until comparatively recent times a finger board pointing to the direction of the well for guidance of the pilgrims who came to the village to drink the water and visit Sir John Schorne's shrine in St Mary's Church. This finger board read 'To Sir John Schorne's Well'.

Sir John Schorne was incumbent of North Marston from 1290 to 1314 and it was during the years following his death until 1478 that the biggest influx of pilgrims was recorded. As well as increasing the population this also increased the value of the rector's stipend. The Dean of Windsor, Richard Beauchamp, became envious and being one of the patrons of the Church, he obtained permission from the Pope to remove the shrine containing John Schorne's bones and to place it in St George's Chapel, Windsor, where he thought that the pilgrims would come. This proved not to be the case however and so the pilgrimages ceased: the spell had been broken.

A story about the pious Rector, which is famous but ridiculous, is that he conjured the Devil into a long boot and imprisoned him there. However, the laces broke and the Devil escaped. Several well known inns, one at Winslow, have been named after this doubtful episode, 'The Devil in the Boot'.

'Sir John Schorne Gentleman borne Conjured the Devil into a Boot'
The remains of another famous personage are buried in the chancel of St Mary's church, those of John Camden Nield who was a miser and a bachelor. In his will he left a huge legacy to Queen Victoria who, in 1854 and in appreciation, restored the chancel of St Mary's church and filled the east window with stained glass, the subject of which is the Ascension of Christ. The Queen then commanded that Nield be buried beneath the altar steps.

Of the miserly ways of this eccentric, many stories are told. When walking to Winslow he once found that the road was deep in flood following heavy rain. He asked a labouring man to carry him through for payment of a penny, to be paid on reaching the other side. On reaching the half-way through point the man thought well to claim his wage, because he suspected that a haggle over the penny would take place after he had carried Nield through. Nield objected but the man insisted or he would drop his burden in mid-stream. Nield had no alternative but to pay!
The Enclosure Act of 1778 deprived the poor of the parish of their common grazing rights. In lieu of these rights two fields known as Clockland and Poors Piece were dedicated as allotments. AH 26 acres of these two fields were cultivated by hand, each man having the tenancy of about two roodes. What each man grew was a big part of a family's livelihood.

The rents of these allotments were collected annually and provided for coal and blankets to be given to the poorer families at Christmastime. Part of the rent of the field 'Clockland' went towards the payment of the winding of the church clock, hence its name.

This ancient charity still operates today, but instead of coal and blankets, groceries are given to the senior citizens at Christmas and a sum is donated towards their annual outing.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

 

Description of North Marston from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

 

This parish derives its name from a Saxon word signifying a marsh; and the prefix (north) distinguishes it from Fleet Marston. The Parliamentary Return states the area to be 1,910 acres; but Libscombe says that it contains about 2,000 acres. Population of North Marston with Hogshaw, 694; rateable value, £2,474. The soil is a stiff blue clay. The situation is low in respect to the surrounding parishes.

The village is scattered, irregularly built, and about a mile in length. It lies 3.5 miles S.W. from Winslow, and 7 N.E. from Aylesbury.

The parsonage House is a small genteel residence on the south side of the church.

The Wesleyan Chapel was erected in 1833; and the Primitive Methodist Chapel in 1839. Both are small.

The National School is a neat brick building near the church. About 40 children attend.

Education

North Marston Parish (Pop. 606)

One Sunday School, held in the church, and conducted by gratuitous teachers, wherein are 137 children of both sexes.

There are several small Schools, in which children are taught to make lace, and the girls to read.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Nettleden

Introduction

Nettleden Parish

Church: St Lawrence

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Berkhampstead

Size (acres): 804

Easting & Northing: 501210

Grid Ref TL010100 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Nettleden PARISH St Lawrence

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 85
1811 101
1821 108
1831 142
1841 98
1851 107
1861 124
1871 133
1881 111
1891 115
1901 88
1911 N/A
1921 N/A
1931 N/A
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Nettleden   St Laurence   Marriages   1602   1836   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Nettleden   St Laurence   Burials   1800   1856   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BRIDGEWATER SAWELL BRIDGEWATER BRIDGEWATER
2 BARNES BRIDGEWATER GASH SAWELL
3 SAWELL THORNE COOK HOW
4 HEYDON HOW SMITH SMITH
5 SMITH JOHNSON MEAGER GREGORY
6 OLIVER THOMPSON BASSIL GASH
7 SLATER GREGORY MOULDER COOK
8 CHURCHMAN CHENNELLS GOODAGE THORNE
9 RICKSON PALMER TROUP JOHNSON
10 HILL HENSON LANDON THOMPSON

 

Description

Nettleden - Description from J. J. Sheahan, 1861

The hamlet of Nettleden is mostly in Ivinghoe, but partly in Pitstone. The place was originally a hamlet in the latter parish, but for many years past it has been separated from both for all ecclesiastical, as well as parochial purposes, and may be considered as an independent parish. It occupies an extreme point of Buckinghamshire, and is surrounded on three sides by Hertfordshire. Its area is about 780 acres, of the rateable value £991. The village contains, besides the church and parsonage, about 20 neat cottages, pleasingly situated in a deep valley, 2.5 miles S.E. from Berkhampstead, 3 miles S. from Hemel Hempstead, and 6 miles S.E. from Ivinghoe.

Ashridge Park lies between Nettleden and both Ivinghoe and Pitstone. The valley of Nettleden runs parallel with the valley of Frythsden, and the approach to the former form of the latter, about half-a-mile in length, is by a narrow road, half of which is very steep, going either way. The sides of the deep cutting, by which Nettleden is approached are built up, or lined with brick and flint, to the height of about twenty feet; and the ivy which hangs gracefully over the edges of these walls heighten the picturesque aspect of the spot. Near Nettleden this narrow road spanned by the bridge or Gothic arch of stone, in connexion with a carriage drive through the grounds Ashridge. Nettleden is the property of Lord Brownlow. Straw plait is made here by the villagers.

The Parsonage was erected by Earl Brownlow in 1856, and is delightfully situated on an eminence on the south side of the village. It is a handsome building of red brick with stone dressings, in the Elizibethian style. The clustered chimneys are very ornamental. The garden ground is formed into terrace-walks and parterres, and planted with choice shrubs and flowers.

Additional information