Ashley Green

Introduction

Church: St John the Evangelist

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 497205

Grid Ref SP970050 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ashley Green PARISH St John the Evangelist
Leigh NAMES name for Lye Green in 1766
Grove (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Lye Green PLACE within the parish
Pressmore (Fm) PLACE within the parish
The Thorne PLACE within the parish
Whelpley Hill PLACE within the parish

 

Links

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St John the Evangelist
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Michael & All Angels
Search The National Archives for Ashley+Green Search The National Archives for Ashley Green
Historical Statistics/Maps Historical Statistics/Maps
Buckinghamshire Remembers Buckinghamshire Remembers - Whelpley Hill

 

Photographs

 

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 559
1811 471
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 536
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 587
1921 595
1931 684
1941 N/A
1951 682
1961 897
1971 1088
1981 940
1991 961

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Ashley Green   St John the Evangelist   Baptisms   1876   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Ashley Green   St John the Evangelist   Marriages   1876   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GARDNER SMITH PUDDEPHATT PUDDEPHATT
2 GROVER BATCHELOR REDDING SMITH
3 WETHERED PUDDEPHATT JUDGE REDDING
4 WARE GEARY CHAPMAN BATCHELOR
5 SALE BALDWIN BAIL GARDNER
6 DARVILL WARE WOODS WARE
7 POWELL NASH CHARGE GEARY
8 FOARD WATERTON BROWN JUDGE
9 DELL PUTNAM BRACKLEY BALDWIN
10 TWITCHELL HOW WRIGHT NASH

 

Description

Description

The village of Ashley Green is situated on the B416 road running from Berkhamsted to Chesham. It is one of the typical Chiltern villages, consisting of a long 'green', with a church, post office/ shop, village hall and public house. Unfortunately, it is dissected by the main road.

The soil is clay, in chalk flints, and there are many underground rivers and streams in the area. There are also underground sandstone caves in the village. These are filled with water most of the year round it is supposed, and no one seems to know where the entrance to the caves is, although it is strongly suspected that the entrance is in a small area near the green, now owned by the Water Board. It is also thought that from the caves leads a passageway to Berkhamsted Castle.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Whelpley

Whelpley Hill

The Romans made a camp on the hill now known as Whelpley Hill, situated high up on the edge of the Chilterns. The Romans moved on and for a while the little place slumbered. Later a little hamlet developed. Through all the changes in the following centuries the little hamlet has survived.

A major change to the village's traditional way of life came with the Second World War. Our menfolk took up arms and uniforms joining the defence volunteers. Evacuees were made welcome and quickly absorbed into village life. Everyone at home was busily involved in first aid classes, fitting gas masks and raising money for the war effort. Then, suddenly, there came the bulldozers carving huge swathes through the standing corn. Unbelievably, we heard that our village was to become part of an airfield. Large areas of concrete were laid criss-crossing the village. What was happening? It looked as if we were to be cut off from the outside world. Barriers were erected at each end of the village but we were told we would be issued with passes to allow us to leave and enter. So the villagers watched and waited.
A few weeks later some American servicemen arrived to prepare the area for operation as a bomber airfield. On a sunny afternoon we watched the arrival of the 'Flying Fortresses' which, after landing, moved to their dispersal points, four of them only fifty yards away from our Village Hall. The local lads soon adopted their favourite plane, for each had a name painted on the side, such as Yankee Doodle, Friday the 13th, Memphis Belle, Johnny Reb and Bad Penny to name but a few. Friendly relations between the crews and villagers soon developed, especially in our Village Hall. We danced and we sang together. It was our boast that we never had any trouble. Preparations went on apace for bombing operations. Each morning at dawn we were awakened by the roar of engines as the aircraft were readied for take off for that day's target. Some did not return, their parking place empty. The village mourned. Many well known faces appeared around the village, Clark Gable, Glen Miller, Bob Hope, James Stewart and William Holden, to name a few.

In September 1944 the bombers left the airfield, their places taken over by the Air Transport Service, whose task it was to return the American servicemen to the U.S.A. In a few months the war ended. The village gradually settled down to its normal quiet ways. Concrete dispersals and runways fell into disuse. The barriers were down. The land was eventually given back to the farmers.

Only the old runways remain, weeds and scrub growing freely between the cracks where so much action had taken place. Is it all in the past or does something still remain? Newcomers to the village walking their dogs in the area have experienced a feeling of a 'presence'. Their animals bristle and howl and sometimes run away home. Their owners cannot account for it. Is there something? Who knows? For many of those airmen leaving this airfield on their deadly missions, it was to be their last contact in this world. It makes one think!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Notes

The ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1875 with the building of St John the Evangelist. A building of flint with stone dressings, the church was paid for by Miss Dorrien. The civil parish of Ashley Green was formed out of the civil parish of Chesham on the 1st April 1897. One of the main families in the early period of the parish is the Smith-Dorrien family