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Latimer

Introduction

Church: St Mary Magdalen

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 500199

Grid Ref TQ000990 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Latimer PARISH St Mary Magdalen
Lattimers NAMES name for Latimer in 1526
Blackwell Grange PLACE within the parish

 

Links

Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Search The National Archives for Latimer Search The National Archives for Latimer

Photographs

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery
Pictures in the Frith collection Pictures in the Frith collection

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Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 N/A
1811 N/A
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 250
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 609
1921 684
1931 858
1941 N/A
1951 778
1961 1225
1971 929
1981 1093
1991 977

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Baptisms   1604   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Marriages   1606   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Burials   1605   1947   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 DELL POPE POPE POPE
2 COLEMAN TREACHER PALMER CAVENDISH
3 SCORESBY GATES CAVENDISH PALMER
4 GROVE EAMES STONE SEDWELL
5 ETHERIDGE SEDWELL SMITH STONE
6 POTTER HARDING SEDWELL SMITH
7 LAW LOVETT HOW HOW
8 KNOWLES CAVENDISH PLESTED PLESTED
9 KNIGHT CHRISTMAS BRUTON BRUTON
10 HAYWOOD CHILDS MERIDEN BATES

Notes

Latimer is in the beautiful valley of the river Chess. The village is centred round a small triangular green, although the parish extends several miles in a mainly northerly direction.

The history of the village dates back to Roman times and there are the buried remains of a building thought to be about 80 AD.
The first mention of a mansion at Latimer is in 1194. In the 19th century it became the property of Charles Compton Cavendish who, in 1858 became Lord Chesham of Chesham.

In 1939 Latimer House was requisitioned by the government and used as an interrogation centre for German and Italian prisoners of war. At the end of hostilities and after the property had remained empty for nearly a year, a college for the joint services was founded. In 1983 this college was moved to Greenwich.

On the village green is the pump which supplied water to the residents until about 50 years ago, when the water company laid on a main supply; one tap per household.

Also on the green is an unusual obelisk in honour of local men who fought in the Boer War. By the side of this memorial is a stone mound bearing plaques with the following 'The horse ridden by General de Villebois Mareuil at the Battle of Boshof, S. Africa, 5th. April 1900 in which the General was killed and the horse wounded'. On the other side the inscription reads 'Villebois, Brought to England by Major General Lord Chesham KCB in 1900. Died 5th. Feb. 1911.' These features arouse great interest in the many visitors who admire the village of Latimer set in the most beautiful countryside of Buckinghamshire.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Latimer from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This hamlet is situated 3.5 miles S.E. of Chesham. The estate was granted by the Crown in 1331 to William and Elizabeth Latimer, from whose family it derived the name of Islehampstead-Latimer, to distinguish it from the neighbouring manor of Islehamstead-Cheyne. From the Latimers the manor came to the Nevilles, from whom it passed to Sir Elwin Sandys, Knt., who held it in 1605. About 1625 Sir Edwin sold the manor to the Cavendish family. It is now the property of the Lord Chesham. When Charles I. had been forcibly carried away from Holdenby, he was bought for a few days to Latimer, then the seat Christian, Countess of Devonshire, and the Earl of Devonshire her son. “It may be supposed” observe Lysons’ “that the captive monarch experienced all the attention which his illustrious rank and misfortunes claimed, from the celebrated lady, whose zeal and loyalty on a subsequent occasion exposed her life to hazard.” Charles II. too visited Latimer.

Latimer House, the seat of Lord Chesham, is of very ancient date, but it has been enlarged and improved – indeed almost entirely rebuilt – by the late Lord Burlington, and by its present owner. It is a large handsome pile of building in Elizabethan style, with embattled walls, numerous gables, clustered chimney shafts, and other ornaments peculiar to this style of architecture. The drawing-room is an enlargement of the apartment occupied as a bed-room by Charles II., when he was entertained here by the Countess of Devonshire, before his flight to the continent; and the bed in which he slept still remains. There is a large and beautiful painted window on the staircase, containing the names and arms of the owners of the mansion from the time of Edward III. to that of the Earl of Burlington, father of Lord Chesham; and there is a fine collection of paintings by the old masters, which formerly at Burlington House, in Piccadilly. The park is beautiful and finely wooded, and a little river Chess is artificially widened in it into a small lake.

The ancient Chapel (St. James), situated in the grounds of the mansion, having become dilapidated, a new edifice was erected in 1841, from a design by Mr. Blore, at the sole cost of Lord Chesham. It is a brick structure, with stone mullion windows, in the Elizabethan style, and consists of a nave and chancel. There is a painted east window of modern glass, and a good organ. The pulpit is ancient and handsome; the carved sounding-board is modern. There is a burying-ground adjoining the chapel. The Benefice is a Rectory endowed with tithes, and is distinct from Chesham. The present Rector is the Rev. Bryant Burgess, who is also Vicar of the neighbouring parish of Flaunden, in Hertfordshire. Lord Charles is patron of both livings. The tithes belonging to Latimer have been commuted for £126 5s. and there are 5 acres of glebe.

The Rectory House is a good substantial building in a beautiful situation. The is also a school, for boys and infants, supported by Lord and Lady Chesham. 

 

 

Little Missenden

Introduction

Church: St John the Baptist

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 3214

Easting & Northing: 492198

Grid Ref SU920980 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Little Missenden PARISH St John the Baptist
Beaman-end NAMES name for Beamond End in 1639
Beamonde juxta Missenden NAMES name for Beamond End in 1535
Beaumont NAMES name for Beamond End in 11670
Beman End NAMES name for Beamond End in 1825
Homers NAMES name for Holmer Green in 1825
Missedene NAMES name for Missenden in Domesday Book in 1086
Missenden Hyde NAMES name for Hyde in 1550
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Little Kingshill. First Mentioned: 1812
Beamond End PLACE within the parish
Beamond Wood PLACE within the parish
Bemond End PLACE within the parish
Brands Fee (Liberty of) PLACE within the parish
Brays Green PLACE within the parish
Holmer Green PLACE within the parish
Hyde Heath (Part) PLACE within the parish
Little Boys Heath PLACE within the parish
Little Kingshill (Part) PLACE within the parish
Mop End (Part) PLACE within the parish
Spurlands End PLACE within the parish
Wycombe Heath (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Records

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 625
1811 678
1821 814
1831 937
1841 1011
1851 1142
1861 1089
1871 1148
1881 1113
1891 1136
1901 1112
1911 1293
1921 1518
1931 1769
1941 N/A
1951 2421
1961 3348
1971 5163
1981 6861
1991 6503

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Little Missenden   St John the Baptist   Baptisms   1559   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Missenden   St John the Baptist   Marriages   1560   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Missenden   St John the Baptist   Burials   1719   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HONOR JAMES DEAN JAMES
2 DELL WINTER PEARCE DEAN
3 SHRIMPTON TILBURY JAMES PEARCE
4 STALLION BROWN BROWN TILBURY
5 MANFEILD TAYLOR TILBURY BROWN
6 HILL HOBBS KEEN KEEN
7 RANDALL STALLION WRIGHT WRIGHT
8 HOBS NASH SAUNDERS WINTER
9 LOVET LINE SHIRLEY NASH
10 MORTON RANDALL EVANS RANDALL

 

Notes

The origins of the village date back to around 900 AD when a monastery was founded where Ashwell Farm (Kingshall) now stands. William the Conqueror gave a Manor and lands to a Saxon nobleman, the Earl of Aufrics, but the lands reverted back to the Crown after the Earl's death. The road through the village was used by drovers of cattle being taken to market in London in medieval times and soldiers protected their progress and had barracks here. As well as Ashwell Farm there is a Tudor house, The Grange, next to the Common, Aufrics Farm of Elizabethan period, and Boot Farm dating back to 1660.

The coming of the Railway through Great Missenden at the end of the last century was a turning point, as people were able to go to business in London, and country houses began to be built for them. The village school too was built in 1887, and is still in use for pre-school children.

Life in the village was very different in the 1920s. No buses then, but there was a laundry, village store and bakery which included a sub post office, and the shops in Great Missenden delivered goods to the door. The baker came three times a week in a horse and cart, and a van brought fish, fruit and vegetables. Fresh roast and ground coffee and groceries from Mr Brown's shop and meat from Stevens the butcher were delivered weekly. The postman arrived at 7.50 a.m. precisely, on a bicycle and in uniform, to deliver letters posted the night before, and a second delivery in the afternoon at 4 p.m. At first there was no electricity, and grates and ranges did the heating and cooking, but soon it was connected and we stood by the switches and all switched on together.
The social life was vigorous and the old Memorial Hall was in constant use for many village activities.

Most men in the village then worked in High Wycombe in the furniture trade, and on the land, while the women did domestic work and bead and sequin work at home. This was sent down from London to one person who gave it out to the various workers and then collected and returned it. The traced material was stretched on a frame, wrong-side up, and the beads on long threads were hooked up from beneath.

The country around was famous for its cherry orchards and older residents will remember the guns banging off and wooden clappers clattering at dawn 'bird starving'. The Bucks black cherries are dark and small and perfectly delicious especially when cooked in cherry turnovers, the local speciality. Many people went cherry picking and casual labour was employed. Nearly all the orchards have been cut down to make room for the explosion of new houses built since the Second World War.

It is hard to tell what the people who live here now do for a living, as they leap into their cars and vanish for the day. Plenty of retired folk have come to enjoy the peace of the lovely countryside, though traffic, mowers, aeroplanes and screaming saws may have disillusioned them somewhat. Those newcomers who really take an interest are a splendid group and can be relied on to keep the village spirit alive still.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Walking was the usual way of getting around, although on Saturdays a pony and trap ran through the village. This eventually led to a horse and brake which could carry seven people at a time. For private use one could hire a horse and brougham from the Nag's Head Inn.

The noise of the horns and bugles could be heard in Little Kingshill when the stage coach passed through Great Missenden. The horses were changed at the White Lion. Little Kingshill was a small village but in many tvays self-sufficient with two shops (one was also the bakery, and the old bread ovens were pulled down in L973 to make way for more new houses), two public louses, a home laundry, a village hall, the old day school and also a private day and boarding school called St Christopher's. In a house near the common a bodger used to turn chair legs for the famous Windsor chairs made in High Wycombe and sent to London by horse and cart.
Those who were children early this century mostly remember the highlights of a year as May Day with the Maypole, Empire Day and other festivals. Sundays were also very important when everyone attended Church or Chapel in their best clothes, often twice a day. The Baptist Church in the village was always full upstairs and downstairs. Prizes were given for regular attendance. Little Kingshill formed a Women's Institute just after the first World War and the Cricket Club was also formed over sixty years ago.
Great Missenden was, we thought, a gay place. At the rear of the George Hotel was a cage in which the drunken men were kept overnight before they faced court in the morning.
The District Nurse lived in Great Missenden and she rode a bicycle before owning a car. As she had to be fetched by walking or cycling it could be quite a time before she reached the patient in any emergency. Cycling became a popular pastime and one notable always rode a penny-farthing.
There have never been any street lights in Little Kingshill but one member's father was the lamplighter in High Wycombe and lit every gas lamp with the long pole every night.

Members of Little Kingshill

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

At the turn of the century in Little Missenden, William Folliott cared for the pastoral needs of his flock. This well loved cleric of Irish descent was a familiar figure as he walked his Parish, a never-ending supply of peppermints in his pocket to be shared with children and grown-ups alike. He also dispensed his church's charities to his poor parishioners—lengths of flannel to make warm petticoats, and coal for the needy. Six loaves of bread were distributed by the clerk to deserving parishioners attending morning service. These loaves, decorating the font top, existed until a few years ago, the number getting gradually less as the price of bread increased until this present day when the Bird's Charity money only provides one harvest loaf.

When King Edward VII came to stay at Earl Howe's home at Penn, the children were given a holiday from school and walked to Penn to see King Edward. The Reverend Folliott died at the vicarage opposite the Church, and with many a quaking knee the school children filed past his coffin to pay their it respects.
The village school, now one of the smallest in Buckinghamshire, took in large numbers of children from the villages around. The schoolmistress of those days was a real martinet. A favourite punishment was to make a dullard stand in front of his fellow pupils holding as many as twelve slates on his head. What as considered even more cruel was the administering  'the cat of nine tails' to a young boy at this time, He had stolen farthings from one of the village shops to buy some food. His mother had spent the family housekeeping on that 'Demon Drink'!
The village up to the First World War boasted four shops, four farms, two inns, a bakery, a mill, a smithy and a post office. At Smithy Cottage one of the two old fire insurance plaques can be seen. This was the only cottage that would have the services of the fire engine of that time, before the days of the National Fire Service.
The village green was first laid with turves brought from Mr Pembroke Stephens' former home near Durham. A lamp was installed to light the green, but a village row broke out as to who should pay for the paraffin, and so the lamp went unlit and during the hours of darkness wheels, hooves and feet encroached on the green and spoilt its former beauty.
The Misboume was a fast flowing stream in those days, turning the mill wheel. The Sibleys kept the mill here and as well as others along the Misbourne, and their Christian charity is still spoken of. The remains of their breakfasts were always taken over to the occupants of the Mill End Cottages.
Life was hard for most of the villagers of those days. Many village women tried to help out a meagre existence by straw plaiting, roller blind making or stone picking and breaking. This latter employment brought them 6d per yard.
The Berkeley Coach travelling between Wendover— the Missendens—the Chalfonts and Uxbridge could be boarded, but the fare was between five and six shillings. The first motor car to break the rural peace of the village was driven by the much loved medico, Dr Gardener, who, resplendent in top hat and morning coat and with his buttonhole of Parma violets, always dispensed his physics and good advice in equal portions to his admiring patients.
Dr Bates resided at the Manor. He is remembered as belonging to the notorious 'Hell Fire Club' of West Wycombe. The Manor is a beautiful part-Tudor building with spacious grounds through which the Misbourne flows. One of the owners produced so many daughters that the two front pews were needed to house them for Sunday services. Latterly Lady Alice Ashley and Brigadier Roger Peake, both with histories of service to our Royal Family, have given a lead to village life.
The church's most famous possession is the St Christopher Mural, which came to light during the 1930's, when the Reverend William Henry Davis, scratching away with a penknife at the plastered walls, uncovered some of the most perfect examples medieval wall paintings not only of St Christopher St Catherine and the Wheel and a Crucifixion scene as well.

Joan Smith, Little Missenden

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes


When I was young, the highlight of our school year was not so much the last day of the summer term as a day when we held our May Revels. The First of May was always too cold and wet, for the celebrations were held on the common adjoining the school. The performers all had parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles, who made up the village community.

Preparations for May Day Revels began about the middle of the Easter term, as they included learning extracts from works of Mendelssohn and Shakespeare, all of which were rehearsed day after day until perfect. The lucky girl to be crowned Queen of the May was elected by popular vote from all her school friends, and other 'star' parts like Jack-in-the-Green, Chief Courtier and Queen's attendants were allocated.
The evening before, we gathered the greenery and wild flowers with which to 'dress' our wooden hoops, make garlands and the Royal Crown. White dresses were ready for the girls to wear with coloured sun bonnets, and white shirts and grey shorts for the boys, except for 'Jack', who had a special green outfit. On May morning my sisters and I carried our dressed hoops and other flowers, except for the years when, in turn, we had been chosen to be Queen.
At the school everyone was busy setting up the throne on the common, and the piano was somehow pushed outside the school playground. If the wind happened to be a bit strong it was always just too far away to be heard well.
It was lovely dancing on the green grass after so many rehearsals on the hard playground. After the Queen's procession and the crowning ceremony the real revels began. Many were the country dances in which the flowered hoops were held aloft and swayed from side to side, and there was also the Maypole dancing. Such intricate patterns we weaved with those pretty ribbons, and woe betide anyone who made a mistake so that the ribbons had to be dropped and the dance abandoned! In between dances songs were sung, about the cuckoo, spring and the beauty of the flowers. The Revels ended with a speech by the Queen, telling her subjects to go home and look forward to the next merry meeting.

Enid Picton, Hyde Heath

Fifty years ago, the common at Hyde Heath was one mass of gorse. There were no trees, but the footpaths that led in different directions were kept clear by the cottagers for walking. Hyde Heath was only a small hamlet but it had three public houses, the Red Cow, the Eagle and the Plough, which at that time only sold beer and porter. Eventually two were made redundant and the remaining one, the Plough, is now fully licensed. Troy Cottage was at that time the bakery where the inhabitants went to collect their bread. Flint Cottage was the only general stores and post office.
Fruit was picked and taken to London by horse and cart and sold in Nottinghill Gate market. Most of the men in the village worked on the farms, some of the women did straw plaiting which was delivered to Luton by horse and trap to be made into hats. I can also remember an old resident, when water was short and having only soft water from the tanks, going to Little Missenden with his horse and cart, taking a barrel to get the spring water for drinking and selling it at one penny a bucket. Several women used to go stone picking, also thistle punching for one shilling a day. There was also a small chair factory, behind the Red Cow. There were less than a hundred houses in the village at that time, lit only by paraffin lamps and candles, and having no baths.

Ellen Morton, Hyde Heath


Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

'People just don't want to move from Holmer Green' commented someone on the fact that many try to secure another house in the village when requiring a larger or smaller property. This thriving community of around 5,000 lies on the plateau of the Chilterns between the Misbourne valley to the north east and the Wye Valley to the south west, over 500 ft above sea level.

Although references to the Manor of Holmer may be traced in the Domesday Survey, by the middle of the 19th century Holmer Green was still only a scattered formless settlement; but the appearance of the village was transformed almost overnight with the adoption of the Inclosure Award of 1854 involving as it did a new pattern of roads and fields and the ploughing up of large tracts of common land. One important feature of this new layout was the Holmer Green Common, allotted to the Lord of the Manor on condition that it was to be fenced in, stocked with sheep and used for the recreation of the inhabitants. When a hundred years later Lord Howe sold certain land in Holmer Green together with a corresponding part of his interest in the Lordship of the Manor, the purchaser very generously decided to give the Common to the Parish Council, in whose possession it now remains.

One feature of the Inclosure Award was the dedication of certain ponds or watering places to the public. One of these was Holmer Pond itself, which was elaborately improved by the Parish Council about twenty years ago and is now a most attractive feature and focal point of the village. The Pond Committee is responsible for keeping its surround well stocked with flowers and shrubs, not forgetting the ducks which tend to get overfed by enthusiastic children.

In the early part of this century timber conversion and the turning of chair-legs (by 'bodgers') were a staple occupation in cottage workshops or in the woods, while other labour was absorbed by the local chair factory in Factory Street (renamed Orchard Way). In June the village became a rather noisy place because of the various devices to scare the birds away from the cherry orchards! Tambour beadwork was carried on right up to the present day, and past examples have been known to embellish the gown of famous actresses and even a royal bride.

Today many Holmer Green residents commute to London or to its outskirts as well as working in High Wycombe or other nearby towns. Employment is also provided by the many small firms on the Chiltern Trading Estate in the village.
An outstanding feature of Holmer Green has been the rapid expansion of its population which more than trebled between 1946 and 1974", and this has been reflected in new housing, modern roads, pavements, street lighting and greatly increased traffic.

One casualty of this development is the house Polidores where the young Dante Gabriel and Christina Rossetti used to stay. This is commemorated by a small close called Rossetti Place. An interesting building still standing is Pear Tree Cottage, built in 1703. In the 18th century it was a place of refuge for travellers crossing Holmer Heath and known as Workhouse Cottages. This building now belongs to the Parish Council - a Council house with a difference!

No such short account of a village and its history can do justice to the people - from all walks of life, whether natives or newcomers - who through the years have helped to build up the lively, friendly and hard working community we know today. As someone has remarked, in spite of all its development Holmer Green is still a village at heart.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Little Missenden, from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of this parish is £3,173 acres; and the present population is 588 souls. It includes part of Brands-fee liberty.* The soil is gravel, alternated with loam, and the surface is hilly and richly wooded.

The village is small but compact, and stands 5 miles N.E. from Wycombe, 3.5 miles S.W. from Chesham, and 2.5 N.W. from Amersham, Leland mentions Little Missenden as “a street a mile a halfe lower, further towards London,” than Great Missenden.

There appear to have been several manors in this parish, and much of the land formerly belonged to religious houses; viz., the Abbeys of Burnham and Missenden, the Priories of Goryng and Bicester, and the Nunnery of Godstow. The hamlet or vill of Holmer Green, in this parish, was given to Burnham Abbey in 1339 by Sir Roger L’Estrange, a descendant of Laci, Earl of Lincoln. “ The Manor of Holmer,” write Lysons’, “belonged to the Longspecs, Earls of Salisbury, and passed by a female heir to the Lacys, Earls of Lincoln; it was afterwards given to Burnham Abbey.” The family of Missenden had a manor here in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

The Manor of Burnham, “late parcel of Burnham Abbey” was granted and re-granted by Henry VIII., and Queens Mary and Elizabeth. In the reign of James I (1623) it was granted to Edward Ramsey, whose relation, the Earl of Holderness, sold it to the Styles family. It passed afterwards by female heir to the Harris family, and after undergoing two or three alienations, it came to Lord Curzon. The Manor of Beamond or Beaumont, and the manor or farm Anfricks or Afflects, in Little Missenden, which belonged to Missenden Abbey, descended likewise to Lord Curzon, by inheritance from the Penns. The Manor of Maunsells in this parish derives its name from an ancient family, who possessed it in the reign of Henry III. The manor of Thorn-fee, or Brand-fee extends to Wycombe, and was for many years in the family of Brand. The Earl of Stirling had a seat at Little Missenden in the Early part of the last century.

A genteel residence near the road between Great and Little Missenden is called The Abbey. A spacious ancient house, a few yards east of the church is called the Manor House, and is now the property of Frederic Charsley, Esq.

Missenden House is a handsome red brick residence, very pleasingly situated in about five acres of pleasure grounds &c. The approach to the house is by a long walk covered by climbing plants and shrubs, forming an elongated bower. The house contains a good collection of paintings, oriental china, valuable and rare carvings in oak, and numerous articles of vertu collected both at home and abroad by its present owner and occupant, Captain John Otway Cuffe.

Little Kingshill (formerly spelt Kingshull), consists of many respectable looking cottages and three farms, one of which is called Ashwell’s Farm, and is now in the occupation of Mr R. P. Clarke. In this hamlet is a Baptist Chapel, the pastor of which is the Rev. Robert Gay, who has a neat residence adjoining the chapel.

Great Kingshill is in Hughenden parish. Horner Green, Wycombe Heath are also places in this parish.

The living is a discharged Vicarage, valued in the King’s Books at £13 3s. 9d., but now worth £280 a year, with residence and eleven acres of glebe. The patronage is vested in Earl Howe, and the present Vicar is the Rev. Thomas Walden Hanmer. The vicar is non-resident, and his duties are performed by the Rev. Thomas Staples Pepper.

The Vicarage was ordained in 1267, and the Vicars were appointed by the Convent of Burchester of Bicester, till the Vicarage was given to the Penn family by the Crown. The account is as follows:- King Edward VI. (1553) in consideration “of good and faithful services of Sibella Penne, wife of David Penne, in the nursing and education of the King that now is, grants (among other things) the Vicarages of Little Missenden and Penn to David and Sibella Penn, their heirs and assigns for ever.”

The Vicarage House is a neat modern residence, situated in small pleasure grounds.

The Wesleyans** and Baptists have each a Chapel at Horner Green; and the latter body have a Chapel at Little Kingshill. The parish school is a neat building covered with thatch.

* In 1849, the new Ecclesiastical District of Penn Street was formed, partly out of this parish and partly out of Penn.

** The Rev. John Wesley, the founder of Wesleyan Methodism, died in 1791, and is supposed in the course of his itinerancy to have travelled nearly 300,000 miles, and to have preached 40,000 sermons.


Education

Little Missenden Parish (Pop. 937)

One Daily School, in which 5 males and 5 females are instructed at the expense of their parent.

Two Day and Sunday Schools (commenced 1830) attended by 28 males and 20 females daily, and 40 males and 50 females on Sundays; supported by subscription, and small weekly payments from the day scholars.

Two Sunday Schools; one (commenced 1830) consisting of 40 males and 28 females; the other (commenced 1832), of 16 males and 9 females; both supported by Baptist Dissenters.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Penn

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 3992

Easting & Northing: 491193

Grid Ref SU910930 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Penn PARISH Holy Trinity
Hoddesmore NAMES name for Hodgemoor Wood in 1592
Knattocks NAMES name for Knotty Green in 1806
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Beacon Hill. First Mentioned: 1808. Demolished 1935
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Winchmore Hill Chapel House. First Mentioned: 1820
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Providence Chapel. First Mentioned: 1808
Beacon Hill PLACE within the parish
Brook Wood PLACE within the parish
Forty Green PLACE within the parish
Gatemoor Wood PLACE within the parish
Glory (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Hazlemere PLACE within the parish
Hodgemoor Wood PLACE within the parish
Holtspur Bottom (Part) PLACE within the parish
Knotty Green PLACE within the parish
Penn Street PLACE within the parish
Putnam Place PLACE within the parish
Tylers Green (Part) PLACE within the parish
Winchmore Hill (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 927
1811 950
1821 1054
1831 1103
1841 1040
1851 1254
1861 1096
1871 1086
1881 1100
1891 1021
1901 1030
1911 1472
1921 1604
1931 1767
1941 N/A
1951 2060
1961 3112
1971 4237
1981 3765
1991 3829

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Penn   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Penn   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Penn   Holy Trinity   Burials   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE WINGROVE PERFECT GROVE
2 SALTER GROVE WINGROVE WINGROVE
3 BOVINGDON SHRIMPTON BATES SHRIMPTON
4 SHRIMPTON SALTER HANCOCK PERFECT
5 WINGROVE HUNT CARTER BOVINGDON
6 HEARNE BIRCH RANDALL SALTER
7 DEANE CARTER BOVINGDON HANCOCK
8 CHILD TAYLOR TILBURY CARTER
9 HILL CHILD PUSEY BATES
10 PLAYTER HEARN FRYER PUSEY

Description

Description of Penn from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Penn parish extends over a lofty ridge, and contains 4,270 acres, and 1,096 souls. Its rateable value is £3,074. The village is large and scattered and lies 3 miles N.W. by W. from Beaconsfield, 4 miles S.W. of Amersham, and 4 miles E. from Wycombe. The place is supposed by some to have derived its name from the family Penn, one of whom was the celebrated founder of Pennsylvania, or it may be that the place gave name to the family, as the word Penn means head or top, and the village stands on such high ground, that several counties may bee seen from the church tower. Beacon Hill, about half a mile from the church, is probably the site of an ancient beacon or signal post.

Penn has been formed of the lands that belonged to Amersham and Chesham, and at an early period the manor was in the Penn family. The Penns become extinct in the elder branch by the death of Roger Penn Esq., in 1735, then their estate here passed by the marriage of his sister and heir to Sir Nathaniel Curson, Bart.

The manor of Segraves, in Penn, now considered the principal manor, belonged to the family Turville, in the reign of Henry II.; and subsequently to the Brothertons, Segraves, Mobrays, Berkeleys, and Brays. Again it came to the Penn family, and passed by inheritance to Lord Curzon. The estate is now the property of Earl Howe.

Notes

The area of the continuous villages of Penn and Tylers Green was once the centre of a flourishing tiling industry, whose products provided flooring for many local churches, and also parts of Windsor Castle and the Palace of Westminster.
Nothing of this can now been seen — apart from the odd tile fragment which villagers still might encounter while digging in the garden, and various 'dells' whence clay was dug; — even the tiles from the floor of Penn Church have been moved to the Herts County Museum at St Albans, and we are only reminded of the mediaeval tilers by the names of Tylers Green, Potters Cross and Clay Street.

In the 14th century, tiles were replacing beaten earth for floors, and were produced in many areas, but it is suggested that what made the Penn tiles so sought-after was a technique, possibly introduced by one 'Simon the Payver' of burning glazed floor tiles patterned in two colours — at a price that could undercut other producers. Because of the difficulty in transporting these tiles, the area they were used in was fairly local, but Hedsor wharf on the Thames was accessible by track, and as well as satisfying local customers, the tiles could be despatched even as far as Cobham in Kent, to London and to Windsor.

There used to be a large house at Tyler End Green overlooking the Common, close to Widmer Pond. In 1680, Nathaniel Curzon bought 'the capital messuage at or near Tiler End Greene with its outhouses, stables, yards, gardens and backsides' together with 48 acres, for £477, 'being the greatest price they could get'. Included in the 48 acres were 4 acres immediately adjoining the house running from where The Red Lion and Bank House now stand down to French Meadow Cottage.

Edmund Burke, an Irishman, was a Member of Parliament elected for Wendover under the patronage of Ralph, second Earl Verney, and he was a clever writer and a brilliant talker and deeply involved in all the great issues of his day. In 1794, aged 65, he retired from Parliament to Gregories. In the same year Tylers Green House had been leased to the Government who urgently needed accommodation for a large number of French priests, refugees from the French Revolution. Burke considered the house totally unsuitable for that purpose but was desperate to find somewhere to set up a school for French boys, sons of men who had been killed in the Emigre Corps or still on active service. He set out his proposal for such a school in the house at Penn to the Prime Minister, William Pitt. He described the plight of the poor children living in the squalor of the back streets of London so vividly that Pitt agreed to the scheme and its financing and Burke was made responsible for setting up the school at Tylers Green House to house 60 boys.
After the restoration of the French Monarchy in 1814 it was taken over by the French Government but closed in 1820. Two years after the School was closed, the house was sold by auction, pulled down and carried away.

Penn and Tylers Green is now better known as the area from which commuters set off on their daily journey to work in the London area.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Notes

The tiny hamlet of Forty Green (originally known as 'Faulty Green') lies within the parish of Penn in Chiltern District and in 1875 consisted of only ten houses and the famous inn, The Royal Standard of England.

A building was mentioned on the site of this inn in documents when Penn Church (of Quaker fame) was dedicated in 1213 and was then called the Ship Inn.
When battles were fought in the nearby beechwoods between the Roundheads and the Royalists, the inn became the headquarters of the Royalists and was called The Standard by the soldiers as the building stood on a hill. The story goes that King Charles I hid there. Certainly after the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II gave permission for the inn to be renamed and it is believed it is still the only one in the country bearing the name of The Royal Standard of England.

Forty Green is surrounded on three sides by woods: Corkers Wood — newly planted with pine, Roundhead Wood, and the largest — Hogback Wood is now owned by the National Trust. The woods still show signs of the 'Bodgers' work. The saw pits used by them are now playgrounds for children. In days gone by these beech woods were used to supply timber for the furniture factories of nearby High Wycombe. Muntjac deer and foxes can still be seen in gardens and woods despite being only 23 miles from London. Part of the commuter belt, few residents work on the land and many are retired.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes


Adjacent to Forty Green and previously known as 'Naughty Green' this village lies along the main road between Beaconsfield and Penn in Chiltern District.
Just off the main road there is a charming cricket pitch with a small recreation area adjoining for the youngsters and, in one corner, an old dew pond now fenced off, which is known to have been used for sheep dipping and reputed to have been in existence for 400 years.

Opposite the cricket pitch stands Hutchins Barn — a 16th century timbered house with a minstrels gallery which, over the years has been modernised. Eghams Farm, built in Tudor times, is a private residence and stands on a path leading to Hogback Wood.

Baylins Farm retains much of its old character with flagstone floors and inglenook fireplaces, low ceilings and wooden beams.

Knotty Green is in Penn Parish and has many large houses standing in their own grounds with two large housing estates providing an overspill for Beaconsfield.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education

Penn Parish (Pop. 1,103)

Two Daily Schools; one of which is endowed, but, about 5 years ago was united to the National Central School, under the present clergyman; and on that system, 40 males are taught reading, writing and arithmetic; in the other, 14 females are gratuitously instructed in reading and needle-work.

Three Sunday Schools; two of which consist of 68 males and 99 females, who attend the Established Church ; these, together with the female School, commenced about 1818; the other appertains to Wesleyan Methodists, and consists of 43 males and 42 females, all supported by voluntary contributions.

In addition to the above there are Seven small Schools, in which females are taught to make lace, and to read ; there is no lending Library, but the whole parish has free access to one belonging to the clergyman.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Penn Street

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 492196

Grid Ref SU920960 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Penn Street PARISH Holy Trinity

 

Description

Penn Street is situated on the south of the road between High Wycombe and Amersham near Penn Wood.

Penn House in the village is the home of Lord and Lady Howe and is surrounded by gardens, park and farmlands. Penn House Estates are the principal land owners in the village, which includes Penn Street farm. Grove House, which stands in the grounds, is the old coach house and has the original archway to the stables which are now garages.

Holy Trinity Church built in 1849 has many connections with the Howe family. It is thought likely that the building of the church came from a suggestion made by Queen Adelaide who, when she was visiting Penn House, said it would be an idyllic setting. She used to rest under an oak tree which is now in the church car park and is still called Queen Adelaide's Oak by the villagers. The church has an octagonal tower and 150 ft spire built of oak shingle. The flag from the flagship of Sir William Howe, commander of the British Fleet which defeated the French Fleet off Brest in 1794 hangs in the chancel. When King Edward VII visited Penn House he worshipped in the church and a brass plaque commemorates the fact.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Penn Street from J.J.Sheahan, 1861.

This is a hamlet in the parish of Penn, which, in 1850, was formed into an Ecclastical District. The village, which is long and scattered, is situated in one of the beech-wood glades of this locality, about 1.5 mile N of Penn, and 2.5 S.W. from Amersham. The new parochial district includes portions of Amersham and Little Missenden.

The District Church (Holy Trinity) was erected in 1849, from a design of Ferrey, at the sole expense of Earl Howe. It is a beautiful little cruciform structure with a central octangular tower, surmounted by a high spire, of wood, covered with slate. The tower contains three bells, and is supported by four arches resting on handsome columns.

The National School, which was rebuilt by Earl Howe, in 1849, is endowed with £33 per annum, the produce of £1000 left for educational purposes, in 1750, by Sir Nathaniel and Mrs Eleanor Curzon.

Prestwood

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District:

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 487200

Grid Ref SP870000 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Prestwood PARISH Holy Trinity
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1870

 


Seer Green

The village is situated amid the leafiest lanes in south Bucks, but on a map made in Norman times it is shown as a hamlet called 'Sere'.
Legend says that Merlin, King Arthur's seer, rested here on his journeys to and from Camelot. There is a well in the village which  still bears his name, and it was here that the villagers came to consult him about the future - hence the name 'Seer Green'.

Read more: Seer Green

The Lee

Introduction

Church: St John the Baptist

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 502

Easting & Northing: 490204

Grid Ref SP900040 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
The Lee PARISH St John the Baptist
Lye NAMES name for Lee in 1537
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: before 1860
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Lee Common. First Mentioned: 1839
Ballinger Bottom PLACE within the parish
Hunts Green (Part) PLACE within the parish
Kings Ash (Part) PLACE within the parish
Lee Clump PLACE within the parish
Lee Common (Part) PLACE within the parish
Lee Common (Part) PLACE within the parish
Lee Gate PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 150
1811 172
1821 198
1831 186
1841 142
1851 126
1861 116
1871 104
1881 122
1891 119
1901 125
1911 775
1921 765
1931 680
1941 N/A
1951 653
1961 651
1971 625
1981 650
1991 629

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
The Lee   St John the Baptist   Baptisms   1671   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
The Lee   St John the Baptist   Marriages   1700   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
The Lee   St John the Baptist   Burials   1671   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PLAISTOWE BIRCH PEARCE PEARCE
2 ALDRIDGE PEARCE NEWTON BIRCH
3 HAWTHORNE DARVEL HEARN NEWTON
4 BATCHELOR PLAISTOWE STONE PLAISTOWE
5 HADDOCK NEWTON CLARK HEARN
6 DUNTON STEVENS BROWN CLARK
7 KING HAWKES BEESON STONE
8 GEARY JUDGE CHANDLER HAWKES
9 ALEA GEARY BARNES WOOD
10 STEVENS ALDRIDGE WOOD DARVEL

Notes

The Lee (from the Old English place name 'leah' - a clearing) is situated high amongst beechwoods on the scarp of the Chilterns.

Very much an enclosed village before the advent of the motor car, when agriculture and allied pursuits, such as straw-plaiting, were the means of existence, many things changed when the Liberty family bought the Manor and the greater part of the land between Great Missenden and St Leonards, during the latter part of the 19th century.

The original parish was tiny, and centred on the small 12th century church, served only by visiting priests, first from Missenden Abbey, and then very occasionally after the Reformation. Consequently the village became strongly non-conformist and there were three chapels (Methodist, Baptist, and self-governing Emmanuel). The Methodist chapel and Emmanuel still thrive.
Until 1867 most villagers had to travel to Wendover for 'marrying and burying'. In that year the new church was built, and a chancel added shortly after, through the generosity of the Liberty family, with oak linenfold panelling made in the Liberty workshops, and interesting art-nouveau lamp holders for the whole church.

Today the village has become a haven for commuters and for those who can work at home. Proximity to London is so advantageous that the price of property has rocketed, and cottages are frequently extended in size, but many of the old dwellings show the traditional brick and flint construction that is a feature of Chiltern buildings. The centre of The Lee is a Conservation Area and the whole is contained in the Chiltern Area of Natural Beauty, so that development has been contained.

Items of interest include the Jubilee Well of 1901. This illustrates the difficulty of water supplies at that time, and until recently. Before the well was sunk cottagers relied on ponds for watering animals, and on rainwater collected in underground tanks, for their own use, when roofs were tiled. When piped water was eventually brought to the village, one farmer, with a herd of Jersey T.T. cows, had water laid on for his precious animals, but did not see any necessity to have a supply of water laid on in his own house!

Another historic landmark is the ship's figurehead at the entrance to Pipers, the home of Mr and Mrs Arthur Stewart-Liberty. This is of Admiral Earl Howe, and was taken from the last of the 'Wooden Walls of England', when it was bought for the timber, and used in the building of the Liberty store in Regent Street, London.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

1861 description of The Lee from J.J. Sheahan.

Lee is a small Parish of 500 acres and 116 souls. Its rateable value is £622. The soil is loamy with strong clay; and the surface is level but considerably elevated. The last of the common land was enclosed in 1854. The village is small but interesting and neat - the houses being generally of a good class. About the centre of it is a handsome residence with a campanile tower, and well laid out pleasure grounds and gardens. It is 3 miles S.W. from Wendover. The females are chiefly employed in straw plaiting.

Education

Lee Parish (Pop. 186)

One small Daily School, in which 6 boys are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, consisting of 29 males and 34 females, supported by subscription ; both commenced in 1832.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


Additional information