Little Brickhill

Introduction

Church: St Mary Magdalen

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1367

Easting & Northing: 490232

Grid Ref SP900320 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Little Brickhill PARISH St Mary Magdalen
Back Wood PLACE within the parish
Battlehills PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 385
1811 409
1821 485
1831 514
1841 563
1851 483
1861 423
1871 291
1881 241
1891 312
1901 278
1911 241
1921 231
1931 241
1941 N/A
1951 369
1961 381
1971 325
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Little Brickhill   St Mary Magdalen   Baptisms   1560   1988   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Brickhill   St Mary Magdalen   Marriages   1559   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Brickhill   St Mary Magdalen   Burials   1560   1912   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RUTTER SINFIELD HADDON SMITH
2 SMITH SMITH COOK SINFIELD
3 WALKER IRONS WEBB HADDON
4 SEELING BOTSFORD PERRY PERRY
5 MARTIN MILES HENLEY COOK
6 HEATH PING STEVENS KING
7 TAPERTOE KING SINFIELD WEBB
8 HALL HATTON KING MILES
9 BROWNE PERRY BARRATT IRONS
10 COWPER NEWMAN YOUNG PING

 

Notes

This village is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The Norman name of the village was Bryhulle, which in time became Brickhull, and eventually Brickhill. There is no connection in the name with the manufacture of making bricks. In medieval times the village was connected with the making of encaustic tiles. In the grounds of the present Grange ancient flues and ovens were discovered. The works are attributed to the 13th and 14th centuries and are monastic, being the work of the brethren of the great Abbey at Woburn.


The church, St Mary Magdalen, dates from the days of Henry II in 1154. The nave was completed in the 12th century and the tower was built in the 15 th century. The Church Register begins in 1559, the 2nd year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

In 1443 the village became the place for holding the Assizes which continued for nearly two centuries until 1638 — that is from the reign of Henry VI to that of Charles I. The traditional place where the Assize Court met is now Warren Farm. Although the conspirators of the Gunpowder Plot were not actually brought before the Brickhill Assizes, it was in this village on the 5th November, 1605, that Catesby and other conspirators were apprehended.

Prior to the coaching age there were five inns in this village — The Old Malting, King &c Queen, Shoulder of Mutton (now White Maples), King's Head and the Bull. These inns, however, did not exist in the coaching era when in the half mile of Little Brickhill there were 14 inns at the same time. These inns did a roaring trade. Passengers from London to Manchester and Birmingham in both directions spent the night here and this of course meant an army of ostlers, stable boys, shoeing smiths, and for the coaches themselves, wheelwrights and coach repairers. One of the largest of the coaching inns was the George, which was only demolished some twenty years ago. It was on the site of the present George Farm. Today there exists only the Green Man and the George 8c Dragon.
The main A5 trunk road splits the village in half.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Little Brickhill from J. J. Sheahan, 1861

Little Brickhill or Brickhill Prava parish contains 1,360 acres, and 483 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,629. The soil, like that of the adjacent Brickhills, is a reddish sand, intermixed with and based on clay. Lipscomb thinks that the place acquired the distinctive appellation of “Little” from the comparative small extent of the lands in the parish, rather than the size of the village, “which”, he says, “although it was, during many ages, the place for holding of County Assizes, has no indications of having at any time, been larger than at present.” According to Browne Willis the number of houses in the parish in 1758 was 69; their number in 1801, as returned by Parliament, was 84; and in 1851 there are 111 houses here, of which 10 were uninhabited.

The village, which is pleasantly situated on a commanding eminence, is distant 2 miles S.E. from Fenny Stratford, 3 S.W. from Woburn, and 6 N. from Leighton Buzzard. It lies on the old roman road, Watling Street, which coincides with the road from this place to Stony Stratford. The place consists of one long street in which are several houses in a ruinous condition. The prospects are vast and beautiful. Before the introduction of the railways between 30 and 40 coaches, and a number of wagons, passed daily through this village.

The assize and general goal delivery for Bucks were held here at different times between 1443 and 1638, according to Willis; “being taken as the first town in the Norfolk Circuit” says Lipscomb, “probably for the convenience of the Judges.” During the reigns of Elizabeth and James, Little Brickhill seems to have been considered as the assize town, and is so marked in Saxton’s Map, published in 1574. The last court of the assize was held here was in 1638. Between the year 1561 and 1620, the names of forty-two executed criminals appear among the burials in the parish register. On the 26th March 1595, no less than ten persons were executed and buried here. The gallows is said to have stood on the heath or common, according to Lysons,’ about three furlongs out of the village on the road to Woburn. Elections, as well as other meetings for the county were also convened here.

There was formerly a weekly market here, on Thursdays, which seems to have been granted to John de Gatesden, in 1228. It was confirmed in 1257 to Philip Lovel; in 1284 to Hugh de Audley; and in 1441, to Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Buckingham. The charter of 1228 grant a fair for three days, at the festival of St Giles; that is 1284, a fair at the decollation of St John the Baptist; and that of 1441, two fairs, viz., on the feast of SS Philip and James, and on that of St Luke. The last-mentioned fairs are held still, on the 12th of May and the 29th of October. The market has long since been discontinued. The making of straw plat affords employment to many of the females.

The Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and Messrs. John Miles, and Edward Ashwell have estates here.

The living is a Perpetual Curacy, valued in the King’s Books at £9, and now worth about £120 per annum. The patronage is vested in the Bishop of Oxford, and the Vicar is the Rev. Thomas Pym Williamson. The Archbishop of Canterbury was formerly a patron. In 1796, under an Inclosure Act, about 600 acres of land were allotted and divided between the Lord of the Manor and the See of Canterbury, in right of the impropriate tithes.

Education

Little Brickhill Parish (Pop. 614)

Four Daily Schools.

One of which contains 8 males, supported by an endowment.

Another, 14 females, supported by Lady Rose; this School.is also open on Sundays.

In the other two are 25 males and 8 females, whose instruction is paid for by their parents.

One Boarding School, in which 5 males are educated at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, in one are 32 males and 30 females, who attend the Established Church

The other is attached to Wesleyan Methodists (commenced 1830), and consists of 21 males and 12 females, both supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Little Linford

Introduction

Church: St Leonard

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 727

Easting & Northing: 484244

Grid Ref SP840440 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Little Linford PARISH St Leonard
Lenford NAMES name for Linford in 1561
Lidforth NAMES name for Linford in 1542
Linforde NAMES name for Linford in Domesday Book in 1086
Lyndford NAMES name for Linford in 1560

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 44
1811 40
1821 73
1831 55
1841 64
1851 57
1861 58
1871 58
1881 69
1891 70
1901 70
1911 64
1921 52
1931 45
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Little Linford   St Leonard   Baptisms   1608   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Little Linford   St Leonard   Marriages   1608   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Little Linford   St Leonard   Burials   1608   1795   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BLUCK PAGE CAVE CAVE
2 KIGHTLEY FROST KNAPP KNAPP
3 ELLIS KNAPP FROST FROST
4 ROBERTS MAPLEY MORRIS MORRIS
5 ABRAHAM GODFREY HOLLIS CLARK
6 NICHOLLS SIBLEY CLARK PAGE
7 MILES ABRAHAM BATES MAPLEY
8 MARRIOTT ATTERBURY SURRIDGE HOLLIS
9 DICKENS DARBY PAYNE BATES
10 WRIGHT ISLIP NEAL NEAL

 

Description

Description of Little Linford from J Sheahan, 1861.

Little Linford, or Linford Parva, as its name implies, is a small parish. It lies on the Banks of the Ouse, and contains 550 acres. Population, 57; rateable value, £662. As to the ecclesiastical rights, this place was only originally only a Chapelry to Newport Pagnell; now it is a separate and independent parish. The village, which is distant about 2.5 miles W. by N. from Newport Pagnell, consists of the manor-house, a farm-house, and a few cottages.

The present Lord of the Manor is Matthew Knapp, Esq., whose seat is Little Linford House (the manor house), a large mansion, partly of brick and in part of stone, delightfully situated in a rich valley.

Education

Little Linford Parish (Pop. 55)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Little Woolstone

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 631

Easting & Northing: 487239

Grid Ref SP870390 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Little Woolstone PARISH Holy Trinity
Ulsiestone NAMES name for Woolstone in Domesday Book in 1086
Wooston NAMES name for Woolstone in 1586
Wulston NAMES name for Woolstone in 1526

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 103
1811 88
1821 114
1831 124
1841 115
1851 102
1861 125
1871 117
1881 81
1891 83
1901 85
1911 56
1921 42
1931 39
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Little Woolstone   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1597   1812   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Woolstone   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1562   1900   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Little Woolstone   Holy Trinity   Burials   1597   1944   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BINION FOSSEY MARKHAM SMITH
2 BENION SMITH EATON EATON
3 EATON EATON SMITH BINION
4 SMITH EDMUNDS FOSTER FOSSEY
5 WALLIS RUDKINS HENSON MARKHAM
6 EDMONDS WEBB GOODMAN EDMUNDS
7 ASHBY PAIN YATES RUDKINS
8 PERSE BRINKLOW CLARE HENSON
9 PERCE JENKINS ROGERS GOODMAN
10 BISHOP DUDLEY PAINE WEBB

 

Description

Description of Little Woolstone from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Little Woolston or Woolston Prava, is 613 acres, of the rateable value of £672. Population about 100. The soil is a staff clay. The parish adjoins that of Great Woolston. The village is small and lies 3 miles S. of Newport Pagnell, and 3.5 miles N. from Fenny Stratford. The females and children make pillow lace.

On the banks of the Ousel stands an ancient water mill and dwelling house, in the occupation of Mr. James Perkins. There are, what looks like faint traces of a moat, around them; also indications of fish ponds.

The Living is a rectory, united with Great Woolston. It is valued in the King’s Books at £8 6s. 1d. The Church (Holy Trinity) is a small plain building, repaired in 1837 at a cost of £200 raised by a rate. There are three bells in a very unsightly wood turret, and the roofs are tiled. Over the door of the south porch are two niches, and a portion of the old stoupe for holy-water is plainly discernable. The interior of the church is divided into a body and chancel. The former is lighted by four good mullioned windows of three lights each, in the Decorated style of architecture. One of them (that at the west end) contains a few fragments of old stained glass. The chancel-arch is pointed and supported by columns, with plain mouldings. The ceilings are of plaster, and plain; the pulpit, reading desk, and pews, are of deal, painted oak colour; and the font is sculptured. The chancel is about to be rebuilt.

Little Woolston parish participates in Chapman’s Charity (Ravenstone). When the parish was inclosed one of the allotments awarded to the then owner of one of the estates, was charged with an annual payment of £5 5s. for fuel for the poor, in lieu of the common rights they formerly enjoyed. An annual rent-charge of £1 11s. 6d. is chargeable upon the estate belonging to Mr. Smith, by the award of the Commissioners of Incloseure, in liew of certain small pieces of land in the open fields which belonged to the church. This rest charge is carried to the churchwardens’ account.

Education

Little Woolstone Parish (Pop. 124)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Loughton

Introduction

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1536

Easting & Northing: 483237

Grid Ref SP830370 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Loughton PARISH All Saints
Lochintone NAMES name for Loughton in Domesday in 1086
Lowton NAMES name for Loughton in 1512
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1832

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 302
1811 288
1821 293
1831 325
1841 361
1851 335
1861 386
1871 359
1881 324
1891 348
1901 371
1911 359
1921 360
1931 363
1941 N/A
1951 366
1961 402
1971 523
1981 622
1991 4734

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Loughton   All Saints   Baptisms   1707   1886   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Loughton   All Saints   Marriages   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Loughton   All Saints   Burials   1705   1916   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CRANE WOODWARD WOODWARD WOODWARD
2 PURNEY JARVIS HIGGS JARVIS
3 ROBERTS SMITH GREGORY GREGORY
4 OLIVER GOODMAN EDWARDS SMITH
5 NORMAN CLARK SHOULER HIGGS
6 NEWMAN YATES BIRD CLARKE
7 WINDMILL CLARKE SMITH EDWARDS
8 COOPER HOLT EVANS EVANS
9 ALSTON GREGORY FOSSEY SHOULER
10 PERSIVALL GRACE JARVIS GRACE

 

Notes

Change, rapid and irrevocable, is the potent force at work in Loughton now. Change, wrought by Milton Keynes new city. Change, starkly symbolized as never before by contrast between old and new: between the soft, golden, resolute tower of All Saints Church standing tall on its knoll overlooking Loughton Valley, and the intrusive, uncompromising, right-angled, mirror-spangled architecture, of Milton Keynes' new railway station a little way off. Doubtless the lovely 13 th century church and the valley which has echoed to the footfall of prehistoric man and the march of invading tribes from Europe will have witnessed many changes throughout its long history. But the rapidity and finality of the present onslaught is a change in itself and can never have been equalled.

Memories persist, however, gifts from the past to reassure us of continuity. Customs, events, tall tales of notable characters and old ways of life, handed down the generations, some even immortalised in local features. Pitcher Lane, for example, with a well still extant; the water now used to irrigate local allotments. Along this ancient lane the denizens trooped to draw their water. A drudgery at the best of times, but sheer hell in winter, some small compensation perhaps drawn from a bath afterwards, before an open fire. The lane has changed, of course, many ancient dwellings have been demolished. But the emotive name lives on and one of Loughton's handsomest old houses, Becket House, the Old Rectory still stands there. Now a private dwelling, it was built in 1868 to replace an earlier rectory and in its turn has been replaced by a modern house. Surviving too, in quaint irony are some two-up — two-down cottages of meaner stamp, built for labourers, but which are now considered bargains at around £40,000 by city buyers seeking a better way of life.

Some older buildings of the village have been lovingly restored and converted. The old school makes a good example. Saved from demolition, it has been converted into a most attractive dwelling, and stands a monument to its owner's inspiration, and the determination of the village to educate its young.

Records of this determination reach back to 1848, before the school was built. Two rooms of Elm House, a Georgian Mansion, were allotted to this purpose. The records give us some essence of village life in Victorian and Edwardian times. Records of absences for legitimate reasons: infectious diseases, flood or snow-blocked roads, contrast with: bean-sticking, stone-picking, gleaning and the inability to pay the two penny weekly fee. There were also half-day holidays for religious and traditional festivals.
Of notable characters Charlotte Gregory must be worthy of mention. A skilled Victorian lacemaker, Charlotte worked well into her nineties. Her claim to fame, however, lay in her habit of clay-pipe smoking and her ability to expectorate her consequent pulmonary congestion with unerring accuracy from workspace to fire. It is said folk walked miles to marvel at the spectacle.

From Victorian times technological progress began to bite, accelerating through Edwardian years to radically alter rural activity. Jack Dolling, now retired, left a childhood baptised by the Brad'l Brook to enter a manhood of hard graft on the farm among beloved horses. His reaction to the. first tractor in 1924 is unprintable! There are still horses in the village, however, at a thriving equestrian centre, catering for leisure and pleasure.
Jack also remembers the first bus. Here we can reflect on changing attitudes, for these early travellers thought nothing of alighting to enable the bus to negotiate the steep rise to the canal bridge at New Bradwell, and weekend revellers would disembark • at a 'chippy' on the outward foray, to place orders for collection on the return. Try that on a modern city bus and see how far you get.

Loughton's oldest resident, Ethel Rose Foxely, remembers vividly the drudgery of the labour of her youth, matched by the uniformity of dress and pattern of life of the poor. The women wore black dresses with white aprons and worked afield, made lace, or walked to Bletchley to launder, for a pittance. A hard rural existence underpinned by well-stocked gardens and allotments, and a 'pig in the cot' to supply the table. The staple diet was the 'Buckinghamshire Clanger', boiled in a pot with the vegetables. This life has gone forever now, and perhaps we should be glad, but cold fingers of nostalgia will inevitably creep around the hearts of sensitive observers contemplating fields where foxes once barked and pheasants scurried, falling inexorably beneath the advance of the neat brick boxes, being marshalled along the new estate road that straddles the link with the old A5. At the sight too of the two old 'spit and sawdust' pubs on that ancient highway mercilessly shot up-market and where the ploughman no longer calls when wending his weary way homeward.

But in spring the high banks of Pitcher Lane will still bustle and bob with flowers, and yet offer a modicum of shelter from the blast of winter. Although the population is about to explode, the heart of the village will still beat for those who want to hear. There will still be some continuity for those who wish to feel it.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Loughton from Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Loughton is 1,620 acres, according to the Parliamentary Report; but by local estimation it is but 1,443 acres. Population, 335 souls. The rateable value is £4,874. The London and North-Western Railway passes through the parish in a straight direction for 2 miles and 66 yards. The soil is chiefly a strong clay, with a substratum of limestone, and the surface is gently undulated.

The village is scattered, and lies to the N.E. of the Fenny Stratford and Stony Stratford Road (the Roman Watling Street), which divides the parishes of Loughton and Shenley, about 3.5 miles N.N.W. from Fenny Stratford, and S.W. from Newport Pagnell. Fifty or sixty persons are employed in making pillow lace. There is a reputed Chalybeate Well here.

Loughton anciently consisted of two parishes and two manors, each having its respective church and distinct possessors, rectors, and patrons, under the denomination of Great and Little Loughton. The union of the two parishes, and their ecclesiastical consolidation, took place in the reign of King Henry IV. in 1408. Great Loughton was that part of the parish which lies westward of the brook that runs through the place in its course to the river Ouse.

The present Lord of the Manor is Henry Billington Whitworth, Esq., of Northampton, who inherited a moiety of it under the will of his father, who died in 1832. In 1851 he purchased the other moiety from his brother, Mr. Robert Whitworth, of London. Mr Whitworth had previously (in 1848) purchased a farm in Loughton, of the devisees of the late James Hill, Esq. The other principle landowners in the parish are the Rector, in right of his church, and the Trustees of a Charity in Stony Stratford.

The Manor House, situated on the Green, is now a farm-house. A short distance from it human bones have been dug up on the site of Little Loughton Church, which was pulled down four centuries ago, when the south aisle was added to the present church.

The living is a Rectory in the patronage of Trinity College, Cambridge, to which the Society, Francis Crane, Esq., (a Fellow of the College) gave the advowson in 1678. The Rectory is rated in the Liber Regis at £14 5s. 2.5d., and is now worth £250 a year. The tithes were commuted for land at the inclosure of the parish in 1769. There are about 276 acres of glebe land. The present Rector is the Rev. John Athawes.

Philip Young, D.D., instituted to this Rectory in 1752, became successively Orator of the University of Cambridge, Master of Jesus College, Prebendary of Westminster, Canon Residentiary of St. Paul’s, and Bishop of Bristol.

Ever since the inclosure of the parish the tenant of the Glebe Farm has occupied the Glebe or Rectory House. The Rectory resides in a large commodious house of stone, situated in pleasant grounds, near the church. This building, which is in the form of the letter H, appears to be pf the time of Queen Anne, and there is a local tradition that is was built by the family of the Hanslops of Hanslaps.

There is a Baptist Chapel, a small brick building. The National School was founded by the present Rector, who as devoted a cottage to its use. About 60 children attend.

The “Town Land” is the bequest of the Rev. Hugh Parke, Rector of this parish, who died in 1514. It now consists of about 10 acres which let for £25 a year. About two more of this charity land has been sold to the Railway Company. William Bynyon of Loughton, by his will, in 1721, bequeathed a yearly rent-charge of £5 for apprenticing poor boys of this parish.

Education

Loughton Parish (Pop. 325)

One Sunday School, with 46 children of both sexes; supported by the clergyman.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Milton Keynes

Introduction

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1909

Easting & Northing: 489239

Grid Ref SP890390 Click to see map

 (tab Names}

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Milton Keynes PARISH All Saints
Middeltone NAMES name for Milton Keynes in Domesday Book in 1086
Mideltone NAMES name for Milton Keynes in Domesday Book in 1086

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 280
1811 287
1821 338
1831 334
1841 327
1851 317
1861 346
1871 321
1881 244
1891 207
1901 219
1911 208
1921 192
1931 154
1941 N/A
1951 175
1961 159
1971 155
1981 315
1991 485

There was no census in 1941.

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Milton Keynes   All Saints   Baptisms   1559   1893   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Milton Keynes   All Saints   Marriages   1559   1836   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Milton Keynes   All Saints   Burials   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SMITH SMITH GREEN BIRD
2 HOLMES HEAD BIRD GREEN
3 LANCASTER ABBOTT HOWE HOWE
4 RICHARDSON LANCASTER SAVAGE SMITH
5 WORRALL HOLMES PICKERING PICKERING
6 KENT POULTER BURGESS SAVAGE
7 HOMES KENT SIMMS BURGESS
8 SIMMES HOLLOWAY LANE SIMMS
9 HIGGINS FOUNTAIN ROSE HOLMES
10 FRENCH BIRD CLARE ROSE

 

Description

Description of Milton Keynes from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Milton or Middleton Keynes has its affix from the ancient family of Keynes, who possessed the manor. Its area is 1,842 acres; population, 317 souls. The parish lies on the borders of Bedfordshire. The soil is gravelly. The women are chiefly employed in making pillow-lace.

The Village is seated 3.5 miles S. by E. from Newport Pagnell, and about the same distance N.E. from Fenny Stratford.

The living is a Rectory, valued in the King’s Books at £20. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £475, and there are 46 acres of glebe; of which 17 acres are let out as garden ground to cottagers. Patron, the Lord of the Manor; Rector, the Rev. John Neale Dalton.

The Rectory House, a commodious residence, of red brick, in the Elizabethan style, is situated near the church, and was erected by the Rev. Dr. Wootton, who held the Rectory from 1692 to 1726. The house was thoroughly repaired in 1858.

In a field west of the church are the remains of a moat, and traces of fish-ponds – probably the site of the mansion of the ancient lords of Milton Keynes.

The poor have a rent-charge of £2 a year.

Education

Milton Keynes Parish (Pop. 334)

Three Daily Schools, one for 25 males, supported by voluntary contributions; the other two contain 10 males and 6 females, whose instruction is paid for by their parents.

One Sunday School, in which 26 males and 35 females receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Moulsoe

Introduction

Church: St Mary of the Assumption

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1654

Easting & Northing: 490241

Grid Ref SP900410 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Moulsoe PARISH St Mary of the Assumption
Moleshou NAMES name for Moulsoe in Domesday Book in 1086
Mulshoe NAMES name for Moulsoe in 1766

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 282
1811 229
1821 260
1831 303
1841 297
1851 239
1861 234
1871 241
1881 194
1891 214
1901 190
1911 202
1921 204
1931 193
1941 N/A
1951 221
1961 206
1971 244
1981 294
1991 252

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Moulsoe   St Mary of the Assumption   Baptisms   1813   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Moulsoe   St Mary of the Assumption   Baptisms   1561   1789   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Moulsoe   St Mary of the Assumption   Marriages   1559   1836   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Moulsoe   St Mary of the Assumption   Burials   1813   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Moulsoe   St Mary of the Assumption   Burials   1559   1788   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 KING KING KING KING
2 KENT MARSHALL WHITE WHITE
3 HOUGHTON BUNNION EVANS HOUGHTON
4 PARKER WEBB GROOM KENT
5 WHEELER TAME BUNYAN MARSHALL
6 GOODMAN WHEELER HARRIS BUNYAN
7 SMITH GREENWOOD AGER WHEELER
8 KINDAR LITCHFIELD ODELL WEBB
9 BUNNION WILMER PERRIN PARKER
10 PLUMMER HOOTON WEBB EVANS

 

Description

Description of Moulsoe from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish lies on the verge of Bedfordshire. It contains 1,190 acres, and 239 inhabitants; and its rateable value is £1,615. The soil chiefly a deep loam, but in some parts a stiff clay. The Grand Junction Canal connects the parish with the town of Newport Pagnell. There are about 150 acres of woodland.

The village is small mean and scattered, and is seated on a conspicuous eminence 3 miles S.E. by E. from Newport Pagnell. The females make pillow lace. Moulso, or Moulshoe, gave name to one of the three ancient hundreds (Moslai), of which that part of Newport is now composed.

The living is a Rectory, rated in the King’s Books at £16 16s. 3d., and now worth £280 a year. The tithes were commuted for about 230 acres of land in 1802, which the parish was inclosed. Patron, Lord Carington, Rector, Rev. Walter Drake. The glebe land is exempted from the payment of poor rates. The advowson belonged to the Priory of Goring before the reign of King John.

The Rectory House is a handsome residence near the church, in a delightful situation, from which an extensive prospect is obtained. A wide gravel walk has been formed from the house at Thickford Park, nearly to the church of Moulsoe.

The School is endowed with 12 acres of land purchased by the Executors of the Dowager (Mary) Countess of Northampton, under the provisions of her will, dated in 1719. Her ladyship (who also left a yearly rent-charge of £5 to the poor of Moulsoe) held this manor in dower, and was grandmother of Spencer Compton, Earl of Northampton.

Education

Moulsoe Parish (Pop. 303)

One Day and Sunday School, containing 25 children of both sexes daily, and 30 males and 40 females on Sundays; the day School is supported by the proceeds of an endowment, the Sunday School by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Newport Pagnell

Introduction

Church: St Peter and St Paul

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 3432

Easting & Northing: 487243

Grid Ref SP870430 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Newport Pagnell PARISH St Peter and St Paul
Caldecote NAMES name for Caldecote in Domesday Book in 1086
Neuport NAMES name for Newport Pagnell in Domesday in 1086
The Hickles NAMES name for Kickle's Farm in 1766
Ticheforde NAMES name for Tickford End in Bomesday Book in 1086
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST High Street. First Mentioned: 1717. Demolished 1960s
Congregational/URC NON-CONFORMIST High Street. First Mentioned: 1662. Present building 1880
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Marsh End. First Mentioned: 1843
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Silver Street. First Mentioned: 1863. Later Pentacostal
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST High Street. First Mentioned: 1815
Bury Field PLACE within the parish
Caldecot (Part) PLACE within the parish
Caldecote PLACE within the parish
Green End PLACE within the parish
Newport Pagnell Union Workhouse PLACE workhouse in parish
Portfields Farm PLACE within the parish
Tickford PLACE within the parish
Tongwell (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 2048
1811 2515
1821 3103
1831 3385
1841 3569
1851 3651
1861 3823
1871 3824
1881 3686
1891 3788
1901 4028
1911 4238
1921 4142
1931 3956
1941 N/A
1951 4377
1961 4743
1971 6334
1981 10772
1991 14134

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Newport Pagnell   St Peter & St Paul   Baptisms   1653   1895   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Newport Pagnell   St Peter & St Paul   Marriages   1559   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Newport Pagnell   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1653   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 POTTER SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 SMITH DAVIS MILLS MILLS
3 JOHNSON JOHNSON HARRIS HARRIS
4 MARSHALL RICHARDSON ROSE WHITE
5 KNIGHT PERROTT BARKER ROBINSON
6 RICHARDSON KNIGHT ROBINSON BARKER
7 WHITE HARRIS COOK KNIGHT
8 KENDALL MILLS TODD RICHARDSON
9 WILLIAMSON WHITE WHITE JOHNSON
10 HALL ROBINSON MAPLEY COOK

Description

Newport Pagenell - Description from J.J. Sheahan, 1861

This ancient market town gives name to the hundred, near the centre of which it is situated, and lies about 14 miles N.E. from Buckingham, 15 miles S.W. from Northampton, 13 miles W. from Bedford, 5 miles S. from Olney, 4 miles from the Wolverton Railway Station, 6 miles N.N.w. from Stony Stratford, 6 miles N. from Fenny Stratford, and 50 miles N.W. from London. The parish contains 3,220 acres, and the popualtion in 1851, including 233 persons in the Union Workhouse, was 3,651 souls. The population of the town alone was 3,312. In 1801 the number of the population was 2,048; in 1821, 3,103; in 1831, 3,385; in 1841, 3,569. The rateable value of the town and parish is about £8,500. The parish is partly intersected by a branch of the Grand Junction Canal.

Notes

IS situated upon the middle north road, fifty-one miles distant from London. Is an ancient, large, well-built, populous, market-town, and was formerly a borough. It is bounded on the north by the river Ouse, and the river Lovet runs through the town, dividing it into two unequal parts. The inhabitants are well supplied with water from the first-mentioned river, by an hydraulic machine for that purpose. The principal and in fact the only manufacture that is carried on here is that of bone-thread-lace, of which it is said more is manufactured in this town and neighbourhood than in all England besides; and on which account a market is held every Wednesday, whither traders in that article resort to buy. Another market is also held on Saturday for corn, cattle, butter, &c-There are six annual fairs, viz. February 22, April 22, June 22, Auguft 29, Oftober 22, and December 22, which are well supplied with cattle, &c.

On entering the town from London, the first large house on the left is the residence of Mrs. Freemantle. A little farther to the right, at a distance, appears a neat modern-built house called the Abbey, which is the residence of Thomas Hooton, Esq. most delightfully situated on the banks of the Ouse, since its being united with the afore-mentioned river Lovet. Here formerly stood a priory, but of what order were its inhabitants at that remote era is not now known for a certainty. It was founded about the year 1093, by one Fulk Pagnell, from whom probably the town took part of its name. Proceeding a little farther, you cross the river Lovet by a strong (lone bridge, from whence, on the right, the eye is attracted by the situation of the church, which is an ancient and (lately edifice, on an eminence, commanding a view of the adjacent meadows and country of very great extent; and the church-yard wall, by being washed by the river Lovet, whose stream may now be observed to fall into the Ouse, adds greatly to the beauty of this almost unparallelled site. In the church-yard are seven almshouses, which were built and endowed by John Rivis, citizen and draper of London, affording a comfortable asylum for four men and three women. Immediately after leaving the aforesaid bridge, on the left hand, is another charitable foundation, for the support of three men and three women, and is called Queen Anne's Hospital. There are also various other charitable donations and legacies, which, to be recited, would swell this description beyond its intended limits. A Presbyterian meeting-house, and that of the Anabaptists, comprize the public places of worship. The town is surrounded with excellent corn and pasture land, which is productive of exceeding good grain of all kinds; and plenty of game being to be found in the neighbourhood, induces many gentlemen to make this part of the country their residence, during the sporting season particularly. For the accommodation of travellers there are three good inns, viz. the Swan, Saracen's Head, and George, the latter of which is principally a waggon inn. The Newport Pagnell coach sets out from the Bull-and-Mouth Inn, Bull-and-Mouth-Street, every morning, Sunday excepted, at six o'clock, and arrives at Newport about three in the afternoon.-Also one from Blossoms Inn, Lawrence-lane, at the same time, daily: fare, 10s. 6d.-Among the number of coaches that pass through this town, we may mention the Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham, Derby, Leicester, Sheffield, Holyhead, &c. &c. &c. and the Leeds, Chestter, and Manchester, mail-coaches; and the Wellingborough diligence. The Newport Pagnell and Hanslop waggons, by Thomas Rogers, set out from Newport every Wednesday and Saturday evenings at six o'clock, and arrive at the Windmill Inn, St. John's-street, London, on the Friday and Monday mornings following at four o'clock; return the same days at noon, and arrive at Newport on Monday and Thursday mornings at eight o'clock. Seats and villages in the neighbourhood of Newport Pagnell-Tyrringham, three miles north, the seat of William Peradc, Esq. situated on the banks of the Ouse.-Gayhurst, three miles and a quarter north, the seat of George Wright, Esq.-Lathbury, one mile north, the seat of Miss Sims.-Chichely, two miles north-east, the seat of Charles Chester, Efq.-North Crawley, three miles east. -Moulsoe, two miles south-east.-Broughton, three miles South.-Wavendon, five miles south, the seat of R. Shuttleworth, Esq.-Middleton, Keynes, and Willen, three miles south-west.-Bradwell, four miles south-west,-Great Linford, two miles west, the feat of Mrs. Uthwatt.-Little Linford, one mile and a half north-west, the seat of the Honourable Edward Percival Hunslop, five miles north-west.

Education

Newport Pagnell Parish (Pop. 3,385)

Eleven Infant Schools; ten whereof contain about 100 children, who are instructed at the expense of their parents; the other, 50 (commenced 1833) supported by subscription, in aid of which each child pays twopence per week.
Three Daily Schools; one contains 20 females, endowed with £10 per annum, and a residence for the mistress; another, 125 males, supported by voluntary contributions; masters' salary £55 per annum in addition to a penny a week from each scholar; the other (commenced 1829), contains 50 females supported by subscription, in aid of which each child contributes two-pence a week; mistresses'
salary £40 per annum.

Six Boarding Schools, in which 46 males and 133 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School, attended by 105 males daily, and 30 in addition on Sundays; supported by voluntary contributions; master's salary £45 per annum, with a penny a week from each boy attending the School.

Three Sunday Schools; one (of the Established Church) with 83 females, who are also twice a week instructed in needle-work; mistresses' salary £10 per annum; another, appertaining to Independent Dissenters, consists of 121 males and 168 females; the other (commenced 1823), to Wesleyan Methodists, and consists of 31 males and 25 females; in all the Sunday Schools the children receive gratuitous instruction;

In addition to the above are Fifteen small Schools, in which 210 children are taught lace-making.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information