This section also includes those parishes in the south of the county and north of the Thames.

Beaconsfield

Introduction

Beaconsfield Parish

Church: St Mary with All Saints

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 4504

Easting & Northing: 493190

Grid Ref SU930900 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Beaconsfield PARISH St Mary with All Saints
Beckonsfelde NAMES name for Beaconsfield in 1529
Bekyngsfeld NAMES name for Beaconsfield in 1537
Cops Row NAMES name for Copshrews in 1766
Copse Row NAMES name for Copshrews in 1826
Hallemore NAMES name for Hall Barn in 1500
Whiltons Park NAMES name for Wilton Park in 1766
Independent/URC NON-CONFORMIST Old Meeting House, Aylesbury End. First Mentioned: 1720. Rebuilt 1875
Methodist Reform NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1825. Rebuilt 1900
Presbyterian NON-CONFORMIST Bethesda Chapel, Aylesbury Street. First Mentioned: 1800. Reunited with Old Meeting House 1853
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Windsor End. First Mentioned: 1880
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Mentioned in Sheahan in 1860
Birchen Spring PLACE This is within the parish
Copshrews (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Hall Barn PLACE within the parish
Hyde PLACE within the parish
Wilton Park PLACE house in parish

 

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Mary & All Saints
Enid Blyton & Beaconsfield Enid Blyton & Beaconsfield
Town History Town History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Beconsfield St Mary and All Saints Beconsfield St Mary and All Saints
Search The National Archives for Beaconsfield Search The National Archives for Beaconsfield
Historical Statistics/Maps Historical Statistics/Maps
Shepheards Lane Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - Shepherds Lane Cemetery
Beaconsfield United Reform Church Beaconsfield United Reform Church
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Michael & All Angels
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Teresa (RC)

 

Photographs

 

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery
Pictures in the Frith collection Pictures in the Frith collection

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1149
1811 1461
1821 1736
1831 1763
1841 1732
1851 1684
1861 1662
1871 1524
1881 1635
1891 1773
1901 1570
1911 2511
1921 3642
1931 4846
1941 N/A
1951 7913
1961 9983
1971 11875
1981 11138
1991 10346

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Baptisms   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Marriages   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Burials   1540   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE HARE ROLFE HARE
2 WALLER GROVE HARE ROLFE
3 BOULTON ROLFE LAKE GROVE
4 DELL ANTHONY CHILD LAKE
5 EAST ALMOND SMITH CHILD
6 HARE LACK WESTON SMITH
7 TURNER CARTER BOWLER ALMOND
8 IDLE BLAKE CHARSLEY CARTER
9 HARDING BOLTON BROWN BLAKE
10 WINTER CROUCH ALMOND CHARSLEY

 

 

Description

Description of Beaconsfield from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Beaconsfield, exclusive of Seer Green, contains 4,541 acres, and 1662 inhabitants. The rateable value is £6,036. The town, which formerly had a weekly market, is situated on a hill, and is suppose to have derived its name from a beacon which stood there in former times. In 2001 the population of Beaconsfield was 10,679, consisting of 5,095 males and 5,584 females in 4,271 households.

Notes

There were great times to be had when we were young in Beaconsfield. Starting in May there was and still is the annual fair which in those days was more in keeping with the 'Olde English Faire'.

In addition to the roundabouts, gondolas, swings and hooplas there were many sorts of merchandise for sale. I remember a Mr Bell who came from High Wycombe, a thin man with a moustache who always wore a bowler hat, who pitched his stall in Windsor End. His stalls were set in the form of a square and were heaped to capacity with every conceivable piece of china and crockery.
People from surrounding villages and hamlets would wait for this day to refurbish their depleted stocks of china and crockeryware. There were 'Willow Pattern' tea and dinner services, white everyday china-ware, blue and white striped jugs and many other designs of varied colours and styles.
Mr Bell had children standing around spellbound, for he would stack heaps of plates along his arm and throw plates into the air and then catch them. He drew large crowds and in the evening he auctioned his wares until all his stock had vanished from his stalls.
We had in those days a school treat for the pupils of Windsor End school. This was given by the grandfather of the present Lord Burnham and was held at Hall Barn. A carriage was sent to transport the smaller children, and the older children marched in a very orderly manner to Hall Barn. When they arrived they would find that tea had been set beneath the trees by the Long Parlour, bread and butter, iced buns, macaroons, chocolate and plain swiss rolls.
After tea a man would play a whistle and bang a large drum to start the show. There was a 'Punch and Judy' and all kinds of great fun and we were given free ice cream cornets, served and made by an Italian from High Wycombe by the name of Mr Delnevo. This ice cream was made from corn-flour flavoured with essence of vanilla into a custard and then frozen. At the end of the day each child was given a bag of cherries and a currant bun by Lady Burnham.
The children, tired out from rolling down the slope in front of Hall Barn, were then collected by their parents and taken home.
If by chance the weather was wet then the treat was held in the coach-house.
On another day during the summer a Flower Show was held in Hall Barn Park. Three tents were erected, one for tea, one for flowers, and another for vegetables. There was very keen competition among the exhibitors of flowers and vegetables.
There were many competitions in progress, and a bowling competition for which the prize was a pig. Mr Beach had his roundabout there and the fares were collected by members of the Horticultural Society to help swell their funds.

Nora Croft, Beaconsfield Old Town

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

 

Education

Beaconsfield Parish (Pop. 1,763)

Seven Daily Schools, one of which contains 80 males; another (commenced 1833) 62 females; these Schools are supported by subscription, aided by small weekly payments from the parents of the children.  
In the other five Schools, 64 children are under instruction at the expense of their parents.
Three Boarding Schools, in which about 80 children are educated at the expense of their parents.
Two Sunday Schools, one (commenced 1825), of 80 males and 70 females, who attend the Established Church: the other, 30 males and 40 females, who are taught in a meeting-house attached to Independents; both supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Burnham

Introduction

Burnham Parish

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 6383

Easting & Northing: 492182

Grid Ref SU920820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Burnham PARISH St Peter
Bournham NAMES name for Burnham in 1562
Burneham NAMES name for Burnham in Domesday Book in 1086
Chipynghamme NAMES name for Cippenham in 1535
Esburneham NAMES name for East Burnham in Domesday Book in 1086
Sippingham NAMES name for Cippenham in 1766
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST Gore Road. First Mentioned: 1791. Now industrial use
Independent/URC NON-CONFORMIST Taplow Rd/Stomp Road. First Mentioned: 1790
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Lent Rise. First Mentioned: ?. Recorded in 1851 religious census
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Widmere Common. First Mentioned: 1833
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Littleworth. First Mentioned: 1832
Biddles Farm PLACE within the parish
Bottoms Waltons PLACE within the parish
Boveney Upper Side PLACE within the parish
Brassels Wood PLACE within the parish
Bristles Wood PLACE within the parish
Britwell PLACE hamlet in parish until 1957
Brookend PLACE within the parish
Cippenham PLACE within the parish
Coppyshard Wood PLACE within the parish
Cullum Green PLACE within the parish
Dorney (Part) PLACE within the parish
Dropmore Park PLACE within the parish
East Burnham PLACE within the parish
Egypt PLACE within the parish
Lent Green PLACE within the parish
Locks Bottom PLACE within the parish
Pile PLACE within the parish
Widmere PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1354
1811 1490
1821 1716
1831 1930
1841 2095
1851 2142
1861 2081
1871 2179
1881 2241
1891 2513
1901 3144
1911 3715
1921 3396
1931 3939
1941 N/A
1951 5900
1961 16140
1971 17751
1981 11229
1991 10855

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Burnham   St Peter   Baptisms   1557   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Burnham   St Peter   Marriages   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Burnham   St Peter   Burials   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surname

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 IVE GOLDWIN STANNETT COX
2 GROVE COX COX WEBB
3 PONDE POND WEBB STANNETT
4 POND VAUGHAN WALKER SMITH
5 MOUNTAGUE GROVE PLUMRIDGE WALKER
6 GOLDWIN GREEN SMITH IVE
7 HARVEY TAYLOR BUCKLAND CARTER
8 ROBERTS MASON POOLE TAYLOR
9 WADE DOD ADAWAY PLUMRIDGE
10 TURNER DAWSON HAWKINS BUCKLAND

 

Notes

Burnham Hundred, along with those of Stoke and Desborough, make up the Chiltern Hundreds. Burnham has a mention in the Domesday Book. It is no longer a typical English village, though there is still a strong community feeling present. The main street is a conservation area and this will help to preserve the charming appearance of its buildings. Any new building has to be in keeping with the old. Very few of its inhabitants live in the High Street now, so from being a place of bustle day and night it is a busy trading centre during the day and almost deserted in the evenings.

The parish church of St Peter dates from the 13th century, though there is evidence that there was a church on the site before that time. Its structure has seen changes through the years. An extension is being erected at present, the Cornerstone Project. It has a team ministry which serves also the churches of Taplow, Hitcham and Dropmore.

Church Street was the centre of the village and the governing body, the Vestry, was responsible for civil and church affairs until the formation of the Parish Council in the mid 1880s. There was a market hall, stocks and the penitentiary 'Cage' for wrongdoers, the Five Bells, the Bricklayers' Arms, shops and cottages. South of the church the workhouse was built in 1763 but after 80 years it was closed and a primary school was built on the site. This has now disappeared, and a modern house built with the old materials. On the left side of the street there is a Tudor cottage, once a shop, now a private house, in which Mrs Sheila Critchley lived until her death. She began a Dollmakers' Circle in the district and was well known by many associations for her entertaining talks.

South east of the village was a watermill, Haymill. The pond serving it has largely disappeared. There are some large estates on the outskirts. Britwell Court, built in the 14th century, housed a very fine library when owned by the Christie-Miller family. The house was sold to a community of nuns, Servants of Christ, in-1919 and called the House of Prayer. It is no longer a religious: house. In 1903 a merchant banker, E. Clifton-Brown, bought an adjoining estate, Burnham Grove, and became famous for his Hampshire Down sheep and Tamworth pigs. This is now the Burnham Beeches Hotel. A previous owner was the uncle of  Thomas  Gray, the poet.  Dorneywood House is the second home of  the Foreign Secretary, having been given to the nation by the late Lord  Courtauld Thomson, brother-in-law of Kenneth Grahame, author of The Wind in the Willows. Lord Thomson also gave land to the  Scout Movement for a permanent camp site.

The forest of Burnham Beeches, about 500 acres, is owned by tbe Corporation of the City of London. There are medieval remains, Hardicanute's Moat. A beech tree in this forest is thought  to be the largest beech butt in England. It is aptly named 'His Majesty’ and has a girth, at 3 ft from the ground, of 29ft 1 inch. The beech trees form very peculiar shapes as they been pollarded for hundreds of years for fuel.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Burnham from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Burnham, including the hamlets or places called Boveney, Britwell, East Burnham, Cippenham, and Town and Wood Liberties, contains 6,730 acres, and 2,082 souls. It is between seven and eight miles in length, and two miles in breadth, and a portion of its south western border is circumscribed by the river Thames. There is much woodland here, very remarkable, on account of its picturesque scenery, especially that portion called Burnahm Beeches, celebrated for the aged beech growing in it. The Great Western Railway intersects the parish. Rateable value, £13,768. The parish gave name to the hundred in which it is situated.

The village of Burnham, which is of considerable extent, is situated pleasantly on rising ground, 4 miles N.W. by N. from Eaton, 3 miles N.E. by E. from Maidenhead, and 3 miles N.W. of Slough. There are extensive market-gardens here. A police station was erected here in 1854, which contains a chamber in which the County Magistrates hold Petty Sessions on the first and third Mondays in every month. There is a Subscription Library and Reading Room in the village. Adjacent is a brick-field from which were obtained the bricks for the erection of the fine bridge carried over the Thames, near Maidenhead, as a viaduct for the Great Western Railway.

Education

Burnham Parish (Pop. 1,930)

Nine Daily Schools; two of which are endowed

One of these contains 24 children, of whom 12 (nominated by the Vicar) receive gratuitous instruction from the proceeds of the charity;


The other contains 13 children, instructed from funds accruing from a legacy bequeathed by Mr. Popple;

The other seven Schools contain 142 children, who are paid for by their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School, for this and the adjoining parish of Hitcham, containing 120 children of both sexes; the proceeds of a small endowment are applied to the maintenance of this School, which is further supported by subscription.

Two Sunday Schools, supported by voluntary contributions; one of which is attended by 80 children of both sexes; the other appertains to Independent Dissenters, and consists of 40 children.  A lending Library is attached to the National School.

Lower Boveny Liberty (Pop. 207.)

One Sunday School, appertaining to Dissenters,
consisting of 26 males and 20 females, who are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Colnbrook

Introduction

Colnbrook Parish

Church: St Thomas

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 502177

Grid Ref TQ020770 Click to see map

Places


Places

NameTypeNote
Colnbrook PARISH St Thomas
Cawlbroke NAMES name for Colnbrook in 1537
Col(e)brook NAMES name for Colnbrook in 1765
Collebrooke NAMES name for Colnbrook in 1608
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1859

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Colnbrook   St Thomas   Baptisms   1633   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Colnbrook   St Thomas   Marriages   1852   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Colnbrook   St Thomas   Burials   1852   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CLARK CHILD SLADE SLADE
2 WEBB BALL LANE LANE
3 BALL HOBBS HARRIS HARRIS
4 CHILD SALTER SAUNDERS SAUNDERS
5 ALLNUTT BABB ROGERS ROGERS
6 ASHBEY ALLNUTT PALMER SHRIMPTON
7 FRANCKLIN PAGE SHRIMPTON PALMER
8 CLARKE LANE MUCKLEY MUCKLEY
9 KIRTON BOVINGDON WINGROVE WINGROVE
10 COSTARD PUSEY SEARS SEARS

 

 

Description

Description of Colnbrook and other notes. When J.J.Sheahan was writing Colnbrook is described as a Chapelery.

 

Colnbrook is a small town on the river Colne, (which divides Buckinghamshire and Middlesex), from which it has its name. It is distant 3.5 S.E.from Slough, 5 miles E. by S. from Windsor. and 17 miles N.W. from London; and consists principally of one long street. The Chapelry is situated in the four parishes of Stanwell, Iver, Horton, and Langley Marish, - the first named parish being in Middlesex. The northern side of the street of the Buckinghamshire portion of the town, is included in Langley Marish; the opposite, or southern side is in the parish of Horton.

Colnbrook was incorporated by charter in 1554, under the title of the Bailiff and Twelve Burgesses. This charter granted a weekly Market on Tuesday, and two annual Fairs on April 5th and October 16th. The corporate body having discontinued, the town received a fresh charter from Charles I., in 1636. The corporation and the market have long been defunct, but the fairs are still held. The Market House stood in the narrow part of the street.

For those researching family history before creation of the parish 1852 there are two places to look initially, Langley Marish and Horton. The people tend to go to Horton church as it is closer, then to Langley Marish as it was along the Bath Road, Iver does not have a direct route, so it was hardly used.

When studying the census, Horton parish covered the southern part of the High Street in Colnbrook and Langley Marish parish covers the north part of the High Street and Brands Hill.

Note

Colnbrook was an oddity as it was a town without a parish until St Thomas's church was built in 1849. Before that date the High Street formed the boundary between Iver to the North and Hoton to the South. Most of the people either used Horton or Langley for Baptisms, Marriages & Burials. After 1852 these services were carried out at St Thomas's until the churchyard was closed in 1911. Langley and Horton were then used for the burials. Iver church was rarely used as it was further away.
Colnbrook Church & School (1951)
Colnbrook Church to the right and School to the left.
Taken in 1951


View Church Plan

View another Church Plan

 

Datchet

Introduction

Datchet Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1386

Easting & Northing: 498177

Grid Ref SU980770 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Datchet PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Dochet NAMES name for Datchet in 1530
Dochett NAMES name for Datchet in 1547
Dotchett NAMES name for Datchet in 1626
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST High Street. First Mentioned: 1801. Building 1841 now shops
Riding Court PLACE within the parish
Southlea PLACE within the parish
Whelby PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 357
1811 710
1821 839
1831 802
1841 922
1851 898
1861 982
1871 990
1881 1202
1891 1582
1901 1834
1911 2056
1921 2406
1931 2537
1941 N/A
1951 3659
1961 4282
1971 3737
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Datchet   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Datchet   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Datchet   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1559   1861   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WEST CARTER SMITH SMITH
2 MATHEW DEARLE WHITE COX
3 HALE OGILVY HANCOCK CARTER
4 RUTTER JACKSON COX GREEN
5 READE GREEN LEWIN WHITE
6 BARKER NASH ROBINSON HANCOCK
7 STONE SMITH SEARS WEST
8 PITT COX GREEN HILL
9 NEWMAN ANDREWS MORGAN ALDRIDGE
10 GRACE STEEVENS PEARCE NEWMAN

 

Description

Description of Datchet from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Datchet is 1,630 acres; population 982 souls. The parish is separated from Berkshire by the river Thames. The soil is a loam of great fertility. The surface is flat but the surrounding scenery is diversified. The villages is pleasantly situated 2 miles E.S.E. from Eton, and by two great bridges erected in 1851, and are called respectively the Victoria and Albert Bridges. They consist of one large arch each, of metal (which spans the river), with smaller arches of stone, at the ends. A branch of the Great Western Railway passes through the parish.**

An antique building opposite the church forms one of the most striking objects in the village. This old structure is chiefly composed of beams of oak, lath and plaster, and read and black tiles, and has five gables towards the road. It was built by Lord Horwick, who purchased a manorial estate here from the family of Gore. In modern times the deserted mansion was converted into a workhouse; and now it is divided into tenements. The old building has just been repaired.

 

** Please note. This is the wrong railway company as the modern line goes from Windsor Riverside to Waterloo [TS].

Education

Datchet Parish (Pop. 802)

Three Daily Schools,

One, supported by subscription, contains 50 females;

Another (commenced 1826), 20 females, who are paid for by their parents;

The other (commenced 1830), 44 males, 14 of whom are instructed at the
expense of the Vicar, the rest at that of their parents.

One Boarding School, in which 14 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools,
In one are 16 males and 30 females, who attend the Established Church;

The other appertains to particular Baptists, and consists of 14 males and 17 females; both are supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Denham

Introduction

Denham Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 3939

Easting & Northing: 504187

Grid Ref TQ040870 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Denham PARISH St Mary
Deneham NAMES name for Denham in Domesday Book in 1086
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: c1790. Originally terraced cottage
Doggets Farm PLACE within the parish
Rush Green PLACE within the parish
Savoy Farm PLACE within the parish
Southlands PLACE within the parish
The Lea PLACE within the parish
Wadley Court PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 796
1811 1000
1821 1189
1831 1169
1841 1264
1851 1062
1861 1068
1871 1234
1881 1254
1891 1242
1901 1146
1911 1290
1921 1498
1931 2609
1941 N/A
1951 4852
1961 6861
1971 7543
1981 6831
1991 6525

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Denham   St Mary   Baptisms   1569   1911   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Denham   St Mary   Marriages   1569   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Denham   St Mary   Burials   1569   1880   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HAMPTON KEDGE ROBINSON KEDGE
2 BEEDELL SMITH BARRETT ROBINSON
3 CARTER CHAMBERS TURNER TURNER
4 NEWMAN ROBINSON KEDGE CARTER
5 PRATT HARRIS PEVERILL SMITH
6 TURNER HANKINS CARTER HARRIS
7 BOWYER GROOM PRIEST BARRETT
8 BOWDEN TURNER HEARN STEVENS
9 SMEWEN NASH HARRIS PEVERILL
10 JENNINGS BOWYER STEVENS ROGERS

 

Description

Description of Denham from Sheahan, 1861.

Denham is bounded on the east by the Colne, which divides it from Middlesex. Its area is 3,905 acres; and population 1,070 souls. It extends southward to the town of Uxbridge, which is entered from it by a stone bridge of seven small arches, across the Colne and the low grounds. The Grand Junction Canal passes through the parish. The village is seated in a beautiful valley 2.5 miles N. by W. from Uxbridge, and 7 miles E. by S. from Beaconsfield.

Denham Place is the seat of B.H.W. Way, Esq. The mansion was built by Sir Roger Hill, on the site of the old Manor-house of the Peckhams, and is a large red brick building with stone dressings, having north and south fronts. It contains a Chapel, fitted up in the style that prevailed in the reign of Elizabeth. The house was the residence of Lucien and Joseph Buonaparte in 1836; and was frequently visited by Captain Cooke, the circumnavigator, and Sir Humphrey Davy.

Denham Court, the seat of its owner Nathaniel Grace Lambert Esq., is a brick mansion much modernised, and is approached by a fine avenue of lime trees.

Notes

Since earliest times Denham has been owned or visited by many famous people. Connected for centuries to Westminster Abbey, Denham played host to visiting abbots and later, when ancient Savay Farm became a convalescent home for nuns, it is pleasant to imagine the nuns sporting themselves beside the river as their health improved.

At the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Denham was leased to Sir Edmund Peckham, Master of the Mint to Henry VIII, and his son, Sir George, is believed to have entertained Queen Elizabeth I at Denham. If so, Sir George must have overspent on his entertaining, because his estates were seized by the Crown in 1596 for debt, and leased to Sir William Bowyer.

Great Royalists, the Bowyer family lost their fortunes during the Civil War and sold the Manor of Denham to Sir Roger Hill, who built the lovely Denham Place, at a cost of £5,591.16.9d., between 1688 and 1701. Very little changed since 1770, Denham Place has recently received a million pound face-lift by the Sheraton Hotel Management Corporation.

While Denham Place was being built for him, Sir Roger Hill lived in Hill's House, a beautiful mid-17th century red-brick house with Dutch gables, situated in the village street, close to the church. Hill's House is now owned by Sir John Mills, the famous film actor, who could be seen on his doorstep every Village Fayre Day, presiding over his popular Bottle Stall.

In 1250 a charter for a weekly market and an annual fair was granted to the Lord of the Manor. The annual fair continues to this day and every year we enjoy stalls, bands, Punch and Judy shows, bouncy castles and roundabouts on the Village Green, presented to the inhabitants of Denham by Herbert Ward in 1952, and refresh ourselves at the three excellent old pubs grouped around the Green.

A quarter of an hour's stroll from the village green, back along the Pyghtle, takes a visitor to the oldest building in Denham -Savay Farm. Built on the site of the original Manor House, the farm was fortified and once surrounded by a moat.
Originally a great hall built on Sarsen stones with many very ancient timbers, Savay Farm has been added to over the centuries. At one time Savay Farm was a common lodging house, charging 4d. a night without supper and 6d. a night with supper, and the present owner possesses a notice board requesting lodgers not to wear their boots in bed. During his Black shirt days, Savay Farm was owned by Sir Oswald Mosley.

Not all of Denham is ancient. Close to Savay Farm lies our 'village within a village' the Garden Village of the Licensed Victuallers, of beautifully laid out retirement homes for ex-publicans. Once a year, each July, the Homes hold a garden party and become a mecca for beautifully dressed ladies and their escorts to enjoy their reunions. A few years ago the Duke of Edinburgh opened the garden party by driving in an open carriage through the streets of Denham.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Denham Parish (Pop. 1,169)

One Daily School, containing 16 males and 16 females, supported by an endowment amounting to twenty guineas per annum, with a house and garden for the master and mistress, and the privilege of taking other scholars.

Two Day and Sunday Lancasterian Schools,
one (commenced 1826) contains 80
males daily, with about 10 additional on Sundays;
the other (commenced 1827), 70 females daily and 10 in addition on Sundays; both supported by subscription, in aid of which each child contributes two-pence per week, and both have lending Libraries attached.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Dorney

Introduction

Dorney Parish

Church: St James

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1560

Easting & Northing: 493179

Grid Ref SU930790 Click to see map

Names

Name & Places

NameTypeNote
Dorney PARISH St James
Dornei NAMES name for Dorney in Domesday Book in 1086
Jekingham NAMES name for Hicknaham in 1826
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Recorded in 1851 religious census
Hicknaham PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 190
1811 247
1821 279
1831 268
1841 324
1851 355
1861 367
1871 374
1881 319
1891 401
1901 358
1911 262
1921 273
1931 398
1941 N/A
1951 660
1961 805
1971 835
1981 766
1991 734

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Dorney   St James   Baptisms   1760   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dorney   St James   Marriages   1540   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dorney   St James   Marriages   1837   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dorney   St James   Burials   1726   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CARTER SEDDING BUNCE BUNCE
2 NORRIS WEBB WHITE WHITE
3 FEILD STEVENS MIDDLETON MIDDLETON
4 FINCH PALMER HAWKINS DELL
5 GOLDWYN COX NORTH SEDDING
6 FOSTER DELL NEWELL MARTIN
7 WEBBE MASON MARTIN WALKER
8 WEBB MIDDLETON WALKER PALMER
9 HOW WALKER TARRANT PERRYMAN
10 COXE GIRDEN SHRIMPTON HAWKINS

 

Description

Description of Dorney from Sheahan, 1861.

Dorney parish contains 1,550 acres, and 266 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £2,306. The parish is separated from Berkshire by the river Thames. The scenery is generally pleasing, and in many parts picturesque. The village is small and scattered, and stands 3 miles N.W. from Windsor, and 7 miles W.N.W. from Colnbrook.

Sir James Palmer, Knt. bought 1,600 acres of land and the Manor of Dorney Court, or Doveny-cum-Boveney, The maonor has been in the Palmer Family ever since, the Rev. Henry Palmer is the present Lord of Dorney. The manor is held by a fee-farm rent of £3 14s. 6d, payable annually to the Crown. The first manorial Court-Roll bears the date of 1515, the Lord of the Manor at the time being Richard Hyll or Hill.

Dorney Court is the seat of Rev. Henry Palmer. By whom, or when the house was erected is not known. At Strawberry Hill there is an original picture, of what appears to be the east front of the mansion about 1670, representing King Charles II. receiving the first pineapple cultivated in England, from Rose, the gardener at Dorney Court.

The Church (St James) stands close to the back of the mansion, and appears to have been much altered. It is a small building, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a small aisle on the north side of the latter, and a handsome quadrangular tower of brick, with stone parapets, the west end containing four bells. The windows, for a country church, are handsome: they were inserted at the cost of the late John Palmer, Esq., about 1840. The Vicarage House has been enlarged at various periods. In the time of James I. it is described in an old terrier as &quot:two bays vaulted over." Since then it has been much improved, and it is now a commodious residence. The school, which is supported by Mrs. Palmer, is held in a house belonging to the manorial estate.

 

Notes

In the very south of the county lies the village of Dorney, bounded by the river Thames, which used to flood the surrounding farmlands, turing it into an island. The manor of Dorney is named in the Domesday Book and was famous for its honey — hence the derivation of its name from the Saxon 'Island of Bees'.


Dorney is three miles from Eton, and approaching from that direction you must first cross Dorney Common, carefully avoiding the cows, whose grazing rights go back to feudal times. The Common is now enclosed by cattle grids, but in the 1920s there were gates, opened for passing traffic by Mr Tugwood, resplendent in a cutaway coat and gaiters. He received a small wage, but made it clear that tips were welcome. There is a tradition that Queen Victoria's carriage once became stuck in a deep pool known as Lot's Hole, and she had to shelter in a cottage.

At the end of the village street is the main entrance to Dorney Court, the beautifully-preserved Tudor manor house, opened to the public in 1981, which receives visitors from all over the world. There has been a house here since before the Conquest, and the present building dates from 1510. It was acquired by Sir James Palmer in 1600, and handed down from father to son ever since. The Great Hall, where the Manor Court was held, contains portraits of twelve generations. Sir James was Chancellor of the Garter to Charles I, and his son Sir Philip was a Colonel in the Royalist army, and cupbearer to Charles II. Philip's brother Roger was the husband of the notorious Lady Barbara Palmer, Countess of Castlemaine, the favourite of the King.

One of the bedrooms at Dorney Court was said to be haunted by a 'Grey Lady', but she has since been exorcised and is seen no more. Today the family still farm the surrounding area, and have developed a new breed of sheep.

Behind the house stands the parish church of St James the Less with its red brick tower. The church is 13 th century, but traces of an earlier Saxon window and door can be seen. The large vicarage nearby is now used by the Eton-Dorney Project, begun when the popular Roger Royle was vicar, to provide holidays for underprivileged children, with Eton boys and local people as helpers.

Across the motorway, a winding old road leads to Huntercombe Manor and Burnham Abbey, both ancient sites still in use today. The nuns were turned out of the Abbey by Henry VIII, but the building survived and was re-consecrated in 1915 to become the home of an Anglican order. The farmhouse of the Abbey became a private house named The Chauntry, and was the scene of a horrifying murder in 1853. The owner came home one night to find bloodstains in the hall and the mangled remains of his housekeeper upstairs. She had been battered to death by the groom, Hatto, after a disagreement, and the murderer was duly tried and hanged. Not surprisingly, this house is also said to be haunted.

The old road, known as Marsh Lane, winds the other way towards Dorney Reach. One of the bends, called Climo's Corner, was the site of the forge where the village blacksmith carried on his trade. At Dorney Reach many new houses were built this century leading down to a beautiful stretch of the river. The school and Village Hall are the centre of activity here.
The building of the M4 brought this area with a jolt into the second half of the 20th century, but has made it an attractive base for television personalities and many commuters to London. As the traffic roars past, how many travellers realise the wealth of history hidden among the leafy lanes of Dorney?

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education


Dorney Parish (Pop. 268)

Two Daily Schools,
one (commenced 1826) contains 20 males and 30 females ;
the other (commenced 1827), 17 of both sexes; supported by subscription and small payments from the children.

Two Sunday Schools,
one with 22 males and 25 females (commenced 1831), who attend the Established Church;
the other appertains to Dissenters (commenced 1832), and consists of 10 males and 33 females; in the Sunday Schools the children are gratuitously instructed, and include nearly all that attend the Day Schools.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Dropmore

Introduction

Dropmore Parish

Church: St Anne

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 492186

Grid Ref SU920860 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Dropmore PARISH St Anne

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Dropmore   St Anne   Marriages   1867   1899   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 YOUNGE WILLIAMS STANNETT STANNETT
2 WRIGLEY YOUNGE LUDGATE LUDGATE
3 WILSON WRIGLEY BOON BOON
4 WILLIAMS WILSON PIZZEY PIZZEY
5 WHITE WHITE MARTIN MARTIN
6 WELLS WELLS LEVER LEVER
7 WELLINGTON WELLINGTON HOWARD HOWARD
8 WELLER WELLER BOWLER BOWLER
9 WELCH WELCH SMITH SMITH
10 WATTS WATTS PLUMRIDGE PLUMRIDGE

 

Description

Description of Dropmore as a hamlet from Sheahan, 1861.

Dropmore, which is 5 miles from Maidenhead, is the beautiful and extensive seat of Anne, Dowager Lady Grenville, only daughter of the first Lord Camelford, and the widow of Baron Grenville, whose title is extinct. Nearly the whole of this fine park, which, including the gardens and pleasure grounds extends to 600 acres, was a wild common, when Lord Grenville purchased it in 1792. It is situated partly in the parishes of Burnham and Hitcham, In 1794, Lord Grenville planted the first here, a Cedar of Lebanon, which stands opposite the mansion, and is a large and beautiful plant.

 

Additional information