Beaconsfield

Introduction

Beaconsfield Parish

Church: St Mary with All Saints

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 4504

Easting & Northing: 493190

Grid Ref SU930900 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Beaconsfield PARISH St Mary with All Saints
Beckonsfelde NAMES name for Beaconsfield in 1529
Bekyngsfeld NAMES name for Beaconsfield in 1537
Cops Row NAMES name for Copshrews in 1766
Copse Row NAMES name for Copshrews in 1826
Hallemore NAMES name for Hall Barn in 1500
Whiltons Park NAMES name for Wilton Park in 1766
Independent/URC NON-CONFORMIST Old Meeting House, Aylesbury End. First Mentioned: 1720. Rebuilt 1875
Methodist Reform NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1825. Rebuilt 1900
Presbyterian NON-CONFORMIST Bethesda Chapel, Aylesbury Street. First Mentioned: 1800. Reunited with Old Meeting House 1853
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Windsor End. First Mentioned: 1880
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Mentioned in Sheahan in 1860
Birchen Spring PLACE This is within the parish
Copshrews (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Hall Barn PLACE within the parish
Hyde PLACE within the parish
Wilton Park PLACE house in parish

 

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Mary & All Saints
Enid Blyton & Beaconsfield Enid Blyton & Beaconsfield
Town History Town History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Beconsfield St Mary and All Saints Beconsfield St Mary and All Saints
Search The National Archives for Beaconsfield Search The National Archives for Beaconsfield
Historical Statistics/Maps Historical Statistics/Maps
Shepheards Lane Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - Shepherds Lane Cemetery
Beaconsfield United Reform Church Beaconsfield United Reform Church
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Michael & All Angels
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Teresa (RC)

 

Photographs

 

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery
Pictures in the Frith collection Pictures in the Frith collection

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Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1149
1811 1461
1821 1736
1831 1763
1841 1732
1851 1684
1861 1662
1871 1524
1881 1635
1891 1773
1901 1570
1911 2511
1921 3642
1931 4846
1941 N/A
1951 7913
1961 9983
1971 11875
1981 11138
1991 10346

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Baptisms   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Marriages   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Beaconsfield   St Mary with All Saints   Burials   1540   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE HARE ROLFE HARE
2 WALLER GROVE HARE ROLFE
3 BOULTON ROLFE LAKE GROVE
4 DELL ANTHONY CHILD LAKE
5 EAST ALMOND SMITH CHILD
6 HARE LACK WESTON SMITH
7 TURNER CARTER BOWLER ALMOND
8 IDLE BLAKE CHARSLEY CARTER
9 HARDING BOLTON BROWN BLAKE
10 WINTER CROUCH ALMOND CHARSLEY

 

 

Description

Description of Beaconsfield from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Beaconsfield, exclusive of Seer Green, contains 4,541 acres, and 1662 inhabitants. The rateable value is £6,036. The town, which formerly had a weekly market, is situated on a hill, and is suppose to have derived its name from a beacon which stood there in former times. In 2001 the population of Beaconsfield was 10,679, consisting of 5,095 males and 5,584 females in 4,271 households.

Notes

There were great times to be had when we were young in Beaconsfield. Starting in May there was and still is the annual fair which in those days was more in keeping with the 'Olde English Faire'.

In addition to the roundabouts, gondolas, swings and hooplas there were many sorts of merchandise for sale. I remember a Mr Bell who came from High Wycombe, a thin man with a moustache who always wore a bowler hat, who pitched his stall in Windsor End. His stalls were set in the form of a square and were heaped to capacity with every conceivable piece of china and crockery.
People from surrounding villages and hamlets would wait for this day to refurbish their depleted stocks of china and crockeryware. There were 'Willow Pattern' tea and dinner services, white everyday china-ware, blue and white striped jugs and many other designs of varied colours and styles.
Mr Bell had children standing around spellbound, for he would stack heaps of plates along his arm and throw plates into the air and then catch them. He drew large crowds and in the evening he auctioned his wares until all his stock had vanished from his stalls.
We had in those days a school treat for the pupils of Windsor End school. This was given by the grandfather of the present Lord Burnham and was held at Hall Barn. A carriage was sent to transport the smaller children, and the older children marched in a very orderly manner to Hall Barn. When they arrived they would find that tea had been set beneath the trees by the Long Parlour, bread and butter, iced buns, macaroons, chocolate and plain swiss rolls.
After tea a man would play a whistle and bang a large drum to start the show. There was a 'Punch and Judy' and all kinds of great fun and we were given free ice cream cornets, served and made by an Italian from High Wycombe by the name of Mr Delnevo. This ice cream was made from corn-flour flavoured with essence of vanilla into a custard and then frozen. At the end of the day each child was given a bag of cherries and a currant bun by Lady Burnham.
The children, tired out from rolling down the slope in front of Hall Barn, were then collected by their parents and taken home.
If by chance the weather was wet then the treat was held in the coach-house.
On another day during the summer a Flower Show was held in Hall Barn Park. Three tents were erected, one for tea, one for flowers, and another for vegetables. There was very keen competition among the exhibitors of flowers and vegetables.
There were many competitions in progress, and a bowling competition for which the prize was a pig. Mr Beach had his roundabout there and the fares were collected by members of the Horticultural Society to help swell their funds.

Nora Croft, Beaconsfield Old Town

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

 

Education

Beaconsfield Parish (Pop. 1,763)

Seven Daily Schools, one of which contains 80 males; another (commenced 1833) 62 females; these Schools are supported by subscription, aided by small weekly payments from the parents of the children.  
In the other five Schools, 64 children are under instruction at the expense of their parents.
Three Boarding Schools, in which about 80 children are educated at the expense of their parents.
Two Sunday Schools, one (commenced 1825), of 80 males and 70 females, who attend the Established Church: the other, 30 males and 40 females, who are taught in a meeting-house attached to Independents; both supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information