Burnham

Introduction

Burnham Parish

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 6383

Easting & Northing: 492182

Grid Ref SU920820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Burnham PARISH St Peter
Bournham NAMES name for Burnham in 1562
Burneham NAMES name for Burnham in Domesday Book in 1086
Chipynghamme NAMES name for Cippenham in 1535
Esburneham NAMES name for East Burnham in Domesday Book in 1086
Sippingham NAMES name for Cippenham in 1766
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST Gore Road. First Mentioned: 1791. Now industrial use
Independent/URC NON-CONFORMIST Taplow Rd/Stomp Road. First Mentioned: 1790
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Lent Rise. First Mentioned: ?. Recorded in 1851 religious census
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Widmere Common. First Mentioned: 1833
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Littleworth. First Mentioned: 1832
Biddles Farm PLACE within the parish
Bottoms Waltons PLACE within the parish
Boveney Upper Side PLACE within the parish
Brassels Wood PLACE within the parish
Bristles Wood PLACE within the parish
Britwell PLACE hamlet in parish until 1957
Brookend PLACE within the parish
Cippenham PLACE within the parish
Coppyshard Wood PLACE within the parish
Cullum Green PLACE within the parish
Dorney (Part) PLACE within the parish
Dropmore Park PLACE within the parish
East Burnham PLACE within the parish
Egypt PLACE within the parish
Lent Green PLACE within the parish
Locks Bottom PLACE within the parish
Pile PLACE within the parish
Widmere PLACE within the parish

 

Links

Links

Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Mary Magdalene, Boveney
Burnham Abbey Burnham Abbey
Burnham Beeches & City of London Burnham Beeches & City of London
Victoria County History Victoria County History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass St Peter
Search The National Archives for Burnham Search The National Archives for Burnham
Historical Statistics/Maps Historical Statistics/Maps
Buckinghamshire Remembers - St Peter Buckinghamshire Remembers - St Peter
Buckinghamshire Remembers - Burnham War Memorials Buckinghamshire Remembers - Burnham War Memorial
Buckinghamshire Remembers - Cippenham Buckinghamshire Remembers - Cippenham

 

Photographs

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery
Pictures in the Frith collection Pictures in the Frith collection

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1354
1811 1490
1821 1716
1831 1930
1841 2095
1851 2142
1861 2081
1871 2179
1881 2241
1891 2513
1901 3144
1911 3715
1921 3396
1931 3939
1941 N/A
1951 5900
1961 16140
1971 17751
1981 11229
1991 10855

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Burnham   St Peter   Baptisms   1557   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Burnham   St Peter   Marriages   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Burnham   St Peter   Burials   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surname

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 IVE GOLDWIN STANNETT COX
2 GROVE COX COX WEBB
3 PONDE POND WEBB STANNETT
4 POND VAUGHAN WALKER SMITH
5 MOUNTAGUE GROVE PLUMRIDGE WALKER
6 GOLDWIN GREEN SMITH IVE
7 HARVEY TAYLOR BUCKLAND CARTER
8 ROBERTS MASON POOLE TAYLOR
9 WADE DOD ADAWAY PLUMRIDGE
10 TURNER DAWSON HAWKINS BUCKLAND

 

Notes

Burnham Hundred, along with those of Stoke and Desborough, make up the Chiltern Hundreds. Burnham has a mention in the Domesday Book. It is no longer a typical English village, though there is still a strong community feeling present. The main street is a conservation area and this will help to preserve the charming appearance of its buildings. Any new building has to be in keeping with the old. Very few of its inhabitants live in the High Street now, so from being a place of bustle day and night it is a busy trading centre during the day and almost deserted in the evenings.

The parish church of St Peter dates from the 13th century, though there is evidence that there was a church on the site before that time. Its structure has seen changes through the years. An extension is being erected at present, the Cornerstone Project. It has a team ministry which serves also the churches of Taplow, Hitcham and Dropmore.

Church Street was the centre of the village and the governing body, the Vestry, was responsible for civil and church affairs until the formation of the Parish Council in the mid 1880s. There was a market hall, stocks and the penitentiary 'Cage' for wrongdoers, the Five Bells, the Bricklayers' Arms, shops and cottages. South of the church the workhouse was built in 1763 but after 80 years it was closed and a primary school was built on the site. This has now disappeared, and a modern house built with the old materials. On the left side of the street there is a Tudor cottage, once a shop, now a private house, in which Mrs Sheila Critchley lived until her death. She began a Dollmakers' Circle in the district and was well known by many associations for her entertaining talks.

South east of the village was a watermill, Haymill. The pond serving it has largely disappeared. There are some large estates on the outskirts. Britwell Court, built in the 14th century, housed a very fine library when owned by the Christie-Miller family. The house was sold to a community of nuns, Servants of Christ, in-1919 and called the House of Prayer. It is no longer a religious: house. In 1903 a merchant banker, E. Clifton-Brown, bought an adjoining estate, Burnham Grove, and became famous for his Hampshire Down sheep and Tamworth pigs. This is now the Burnham Beeches Hotel. A previous owner was the uncle of  Thomas  Gray, the poet.  Dorneywood House is the second home of  the Foreign Secretary, having been given to the nation by the late Lord  Courtauld Thomson, brother-in-law of Kenneth Grahame, author of The Wind in the Willows. Lord Thomson also gave land to the  Scout Movement for a permanent camp site.

The forest of Burnham Beeches, about 500 acres, is owned by tbe Corporation of the City of London. There are medieval remains, Hardicanute's Moat. A beech tree in this forest is thought  to be the largest beech butt in England. It is aptly named 'His Majesty’ and has a girth, at 3 ft from the ground, of 29ft 1 inch. The beech trees form very peculiar shapes as they been pollarded for hundreds of years for fuel.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Burnham from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Burnham, including the hamlets or places called Boveney, Britwell, East Burnham, Cippenham, and Town and Wood Liberties, contains 6,730 acres, and 2,082 souls. It is between seven and eight miles in length, and two miles in breadth, and a portion of its south western border is circumscribed by the river Thames. There is much woodland here, very remarkable, on account of its picturesque scenery, especially that portion called Burnahm Beeches, celebrated for the aged beech growing in it. The Great Western Railway intersects the parish. Rateable value, £13,768. The parish gave name to the hundred in which it is situated.

The village of Burnham, which is of considerable extent, is situated pleasantly on rising ground, 4 miles N.W. by N. from Eaton, 3 miles N.E. by E. from Maidenhead, and 3 miles N.W. of Slough. There are extensive market-gardens here. A police station was erected here in 1854, which contains a chamber in which the County Magistrates hold Petty Sessions on the first and third Mondays in every month. There is a Subscription Library and Reading Room in the village. Adjacent is a brick-field from which were obtained the bricks for the erection of the fine bridge carried over the Thames, near Maidenhead, as a viaduct for the Great Western Railway.

Education

Burnham Parish (Pop. 1,930)

Nine Daily Schools; two of which are endowed

One of these contains 24 children, of whom 12 (nominated by the Vicar) receive gratuitous instruction from the proceeds of the charity;


The other contains 13 children, instructed from funds accruing from a legacy bequeathed by Mr. Popple;

The other seven Schools contain 142 children, who are paid for by their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School, for this and the adjoining parish of Hitcham, containing 120 children of both sexes; the proceeds of a small endowment are applied to the maintenance of this School, which is further supported by subscription.

Two Sunday Schools, supported by voluntary contributions; one of which is attended by 80 children of both sexes; the other appertains to Independent Dissenters, and consists of 40 children.  A lending Library is attached to the National School.

Lower Boveny Liberty (Pop. 207.)

One Sunday School, appertaining to Dissenters,
consisting of 26 males and 20 females, who are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.