This section also includes those parishes in the south of the county and north of the Thames.

Iver

Introduction

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 6467

Easting & Northing: 503181

Grid Ref TQ030810 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Iver PARISH St Peter
Ever NAMES name for Iver in 1526, 1535 & 1597
Evreham NAMES name for Iver in the Domesday Book in 1086
Galyhylle NAMES name for Gallow Hill in 1517
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST West Square. First Mentioned: before 1700. Now a cottage
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Iver Heath. First Mentioned: 1837
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST High Street, Colnbrook. First Mentioned: 1708. Chapel built 1871
Bangers Park PLACE within the parish
Delaford Park PLACE within the parish
Gallow Hill PLACE within the parish
Love Green PLACE within the parish
Mansfield House PLACE within the parish
Richings Park PLACE within the parish
Shredding Green PLACE within the parish
Spital (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Sutton PLACE within the parish
Thorney PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1377
1811 1635
1821 1663
1831 1870
1841 1948
1851 1985
1861 2114
1871 2239
1881 2309
1891 2476
1901 2690
1911 2767
1921 3095
1931 4919
1941 N/A
1951 9661
1961 10789
1971 11207
1981 11190
1991 10528

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Iver   St Peter   Baptisms   1605   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Iver   St Peter   Marriages   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Iver   St Peter   Burials   1678   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1863     1882         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1933     1940         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1940     1955         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1932     1949     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     infants     Iver     1906     1923     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1891     1896         Logbook
    Iver     boys     Iver     1925     1933         Logbook
    Iver     boys     Iver     1880     1891     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1885     1910     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1911     1932         Admissions Register
    Iver     girls     Iver     1928     1932         Logbook
    Iver     girls     Iver     1903     1926         Admissions Register
    Iver     infants     Iver     1899     1932         Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 DARY SMITH STANBOROUGH RUTTER
2 CARTER RUTTER TAYLOR CARTER
3 EDWARDS BINFIELD BALL SMITH
4 MARTIN ALLEN RUTTER STANBOROUGH
5 NICHOLAS CARTER CARTER BALL
6 NASH NASH BROWN TAYLOR
7 MOSELY WELLS STEVENS BINFIELD
8 HARRIS CLARK WHITE WHITE
9 BUTTERFIELD SAUNDERS SMITH NASH
10 WOODBRIDGE HARTWELL HALL ALLEN

 

Description

Description of Iver parish, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Iver parish is 10.5 miles long and includes a portion of Colnbrook chapelry. The area is 6,149 acres; population 2,114; rateable value £15,758. The surface is varied, and the lower grounds are watered by the Colne. The Great Western Railway passes through the parish. The village is long and scattered and lies about 3.5 miles N.N.E. from Colnbrook, and 2.5 miles S.S.W. from Uxbridge. Iver is a place of some antiquity, and formerly a Market granted to Lord Neville, in 1351, and confirmed in 1461 together with an additional grant of two Fairs, to the Dean and Cannons of Windsor. The market has long been discontinued, and only a pleasure fair is now held in July.
Richings Park is now the seat of C. Meeking, Esq., who purchased the Rectory Manor in 1855 from John Sullivan Esq. This estate was purchased from the family of Britton by Sir Peter Apsley, Knt., whose grand-daughter carried it in marriage to Sir B. Bathurst, who died in 1704. His son who was created Lord Bathurst in 1711, collected hither all the clever men of his time. He alienated the estate in 1739 to the Earl of Hertford, afterwards Duke of Somerset who called the house of Perey Lodge, and died here in 1750. His Duchess, who held this estate in dower died here in 1754, and the estate came to her daughter, the Countess of Northumberland, whose husband (the Duke) conveyed it to Sir John Coghill, whose widow (Countess Dowager of Charleville) sold it in 1786 to the Right Hon. John Sullivan, M.P. for Old Sarum. The old house was afterwards accidentally burnt down, when Mr Sullivan built the present handsome mansion, in a more elevated part of the park. The house stands about one mile from Colnbrook, and two miles from Iver. The grounds run up close to Colnbrook.
Huntsmore Park is the seat of C. Tower, Esq. The house stands in a small agreeable park half a mile from Iver, and is a large gabled building. An old manor-house, approached by a court-yard existed here in the reign of Henry VIII. The Tower family purchased the place of Sir W. Bowyer, of Denham, in 1696. Iver Grove, a mile from the village, is the seat of the Rev. R. M. Boultbie. It was formerly the property of Admiral Lord Gambier. Lipscomb gives a plate of Delaford Park, the fine seat of Charles Clowes, Esq. The place is situated north of Iver, and was purchased in 1790, from Sir W. Young by C. Clowes, Esq. It had previously belonged to the Tash and Lawrence families. There are several other good houses scattered over the parish.
Within two miles of Iver are two hamlets called Shredding Green, Love Green, and Thorney. Oliver Cromwell is said to have resided at the latter place. There is a paper mill at Thorney.

Notes

Iver is recorded in the Domesday Book (Yfer - the word meaning a steep slope) but the first mention of Iver Heath (Everheth) seems to be about 1365. It was a sparsely populated area criss-crossed with many tracks and footpaths. Dick Turpin is reputed to have roamed the Heath.

The people eked out a precarious living from agriculture, and life must have been very hard for them. There was once a Workhouse perhaps an indication of just how hard the times were.

Our church, St Margarets, was built about 1862, and is a very beautiful building that blends into the countryside and did a great deal towards uplifting the people of the area at that time.

Over the years more and more people have come to live in the area and modern roads and improved transport have all contributed towards its growth. The famous Pinewood Studios where all the James Bond films have been produced, and which boasts the biggest studio in the world is within our borders, also Black Park where outdoor filming often takes place. The latter is also the venue for the South Bucks Agricultural Show which takes place annually.
Iver Heath W.I. was founded in 1920 and has flourished and grown since that time playing an active role in the village. During the Second World War they made meat pies under the National Pie Scheme — these pies were sold for Vid. profit each. Another wartime activity was canning fruit and vegetables — the Institute owned the canning machine which could be used by people for a small payment.

Our new Village Hall was completed in 1966 with a grant from Bucks County Council and voluntary donations of many sorts. One fund raising activity was selling bricks for 1/- each, and this raised hundreds of pounds - if you bought a brick your name was on it! The Hall was officially declared open by Lord and Lady Drumalbyn.

New motorways, a mixed blessing, have given us easy access to other parts of the country and the M25 has actually removed quite a lot of the heavy traffic which thundered past a lot of houses for many years, so progress is not always bad.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Iver Parish, with part of Colnbrook Chapelry (Pop. 1,870)

Five Daily Schools, one of which contains 20 females, who are paid for by private benevolence; in the other four, partly supported by private charity, and partly by payments from the parents, are 109 females.

Four Day and boarding Schools, in which 50 males and 16 females are educated vat the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday  National School, endowed with fee farm rents amounting to £16 6s. per annum, and the interest of £200  three per cent, consols; it is further supported by voluntary contributions, amounting in the whole to £40 per annum, which is paid to the master; a few of the children are also paid for by their parents.  This School is attended by 50 males duly, and about 8 in addition on Sundays.

One Sunday School, supported by the wife and daughter of the Vicar, in which 70 females are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Iver Heath

Introduction

Church: St Margaret

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 503181

Grid Ref TQ030810 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Iver Heath PARISH St Margaret

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Iver Heath   St Margaret   Baptisms   1862   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Iver Heath   St Margaret   Marriages   1863   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Iver Heath   St Margaret   Burials   1862   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ALLYN YOUNG DUNTON DUNTON
2 CHILTON YEOMANS SHARP SHARP
3 YOUNG WYMAN TIMMS TIMMS
4 YEOMANS WYKES PRIEST PRIEST
5 WYMAN WORLEY FIELD FIELD
6 WYKES WOOLLS SMITH SMITH
7 WORLEY WOOLEY BOWLER BOWLER
8 WOOLLS WOOLDRIDGE SPRING SPRING
9 WOOLEY WOODWARD REID REID
10 WOOLDRIDGE WOODS THRIFT THRIFT

Description

Description of Iver Heath from Kelly's Directory 1903

Iver Heath, is an esslesiastical parish, from July 22, 1862, out of a portion of Iver parish. The church of St Margaret is a structure of brick, faced with flint, in the Early Decorated style, and consists of chancel and nave, with a low embattled tower on the south side containing a clock and two bells; there are ten stained windows; the chancel floor has been relaid, and a new table and marble steps provided at the cost of Mrs. Summers and here sister Miss Whip; the church affords 300 sittings. The register dated from 1862. The living is a rectory , net yearly value £120, with 4.75 acres of glebe and residence, in the gift of Lt.-Col. C. Meeking, and held since 1902 by Rev. George Harold Colshaw M.A. of Exeter College, Oxford. The area of the parish is 2,000 acres; the population in 1901 was 717, in 1911 was 779.

Langley Marish

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 3937

Easting & Northing: 501182

Grid Ref TQ010820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Langley Marish PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Langley Maries NAMES name for Langley Marish in 1546
Independent NON-CONFORMIST The Chapel, George Green. First Mentioned: 1805. sold to C of E c1860
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Langley Free Church, George Green. First Mentioned: 1800
Alderbourne (Manor) PLACE within the parish
Colnbrook (Part) PLACE town in parish until 1853
George Green PLACE within the parish
Horsemoor Green PLACE within the parish
Middle Green PLACE within the parish
Mount Fidget Wood PLACE within the parish
Parlaunt Park PLACE within the parish
Westmoor PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note Became part of Slough
1801 1215
1811 1571
1821 1616
1831 1797
1841 1844
1851 1874
1861 1874
1871 1964
1881 2162
1891 2474
1901 3167
1911 3120
1921 1179
1931 1180
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Langley Marish   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1645   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Langley Marish   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Langley Marish   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1697   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SMITH SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 STYLE MILLER STEVENS BIGGS
3 WARD STREETING EVANS GREEN
4 HAWKINS WEBB FINCH BALL
5 SQUIRE BALL GREEN STEVENS
6 REDINGTON BIGGS COLESHILL BUCKLAND
7 BAVIN WILLIS SPICER SPICER
8 STILE TAYLOR BIGGS EVANS
9 GROVE WARD JOYS FINCH
10 COALE WILD CLEMENTS JONES

Description

Description of Langley Marish from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Langley Marish, or Maries, contains 3,895 acres including a portion of Colnbrook); and 1,874 persons. The soil is a gravelly loam. The Great Western Railway intersects the parish, and here is the Langley Station on that line. The village is 2 miles E. from Slough.

Langley was formerly included in Wyrardsbury. Henry VII. granted the manor to his Queen; and his successor granted it to Katherine, Princess of Wales. Henry VIII. afterwards granted it to Henry Norres, Esq., with the office of Keeper of the King’s Woods in the county; and, in 1540, he granted the Manor of Leveyng, and the Park of Plaunt in Langley, to Sir A. Denny. Edward VI. granted this manor and the Park to the Princess Elizabeth. In 1626, Charles I. granted the manor to Sir John Kederminster. His daughter carried it in marriage to Sir John Parsons, whose son sold it, in 1669, to Henry Seymour Esq. From the Seymours it passed to Lord Masham, who sold the estate in 1788 to Sir Robert Bateson Harvey, Bart., and Robert Harvey, Esq. is its present owner. John Nash, Esq., is a principal landowner.

Langley Park is the seat of R Harvey, Esq. The present mansion, a handsome square building, of stone, was erected by the Duke of Marlborough. In it is a fine collection of pictures. The park contains about 300 acres, is beautifully wooded, and has a lake at its centre.

There are hamlets in Langley parish called Horsemoor Green, George Green, Middle Green, and Langley Broom. There are several good residences in various parts of the parish.

The living is a Perpetual Curacy in the incumbency of the Rev. W.D. Scoones. Impropriator, John Nash. Esq. The church of Langley was formerly a chapel of ease Wyrardsbury; and, until 1856, the Curacy was annexed to that vicarage. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £624; and the small tithes for about £276.

The church (St. Mary) is an ancient Gothic edifice, consisting of a chancel and nave, with a north aisle, in which are five bells and a clock. The church was repewed in 1848, at an expense of £650. The oak stalls in the chancel were then restored by the impropriator. Adjoining the south side of the nave is a small aisle containing the manor-pew, erected by Sir John Kederminster, and separated from the church by a fine screen of artificial stone, consisting of a double range of a quadrupled slender columns supporting a vaulted and groined roof. Sir John also converted the south porch into a Library, in which he placed 300 volumes., chiefly of divinity. The aisle and library are richly painted, ornamented with coats of arms, sentences of Scripture, &c. There is a wooden screen beneath the chancel arch, and the sedilia and piscina in the chancel are rich, The organ is on a gallery at the west end of the aisle. There are three fine monuments belonging to the Kederminster, Gosling and Harvey families; and tablets, brasses, and inscriptions to members of the families of Bowser, Boter, Froggatt, Morice, Port, Redington, Parker, Hubert, Styles, Cockett, Leigh, Smith, Daw Nash &c. In the churchyard is a fine old yew tree.

The parsonage house is a plain old building. The Boy’s School, a short distance from the village, was built about 1843, at a cost of £250, on a site given by Maurice Swabey Esq, The Girl’s School, in the village, was rebuilt, enlarged, and a teacher’s house added in 1859, at the cost of Miss Elizabeth Cane, who at the same time endowed it with £100 stock. Mr C.T. Depree, who built the original school, in 1830, endowed it with £100 stock. There is an infant school at George Green, built in 1858, by Mrs Harvey (who supports it): and another, supported by Miss Atkins, is held in a cottage at Horsemoor Green.

A building at George Green, formerly an Independent Chapel, is now used for the purposed of the established church.

Sir J Kederminster founded and endowed Almshouses here in 1649, for four poor people, each of whom now receives 4s. 4d. per week. The Seymour family, in 1679, founded and endowed Almshouses here for six poor women, who receives from the funds of the charity 2s. 7.5d. per week; but Lord Carington makes this sum up to 5s. per week. At Langley Broom are Almshouses erected and endowed by Mr William Wild, in 1839, for four poor old agricultural labourers. The inmates receive 3s. a week each.

According to the Charity Commissioners’ Report, the charities of Langley parish amount altogether to about £244 per annum.

Notes

I was born in Langley, Bucks, in March 1924 and have lived in Bucks the best part of my life. We used to walk through fields and over the farm land which stretched for miles around and wander along the stream running into Datchet. Over the last few years many houses and new housing estates have been built
£ and all farms and fields done away with. In the village there was a blacksmith in a tiny row of houses, now turned into a block of modern houses, and also a home-made bakery which was there for years. It was run by Mr and Mrs Rymes and family. They are quite old now.

Nearby was a quaint cottage and some old-fashioned public houses, one called the Plough. Also in the village were a sweet shop, food shop and a greengrocer which have now been furnished with more modern fronts. The old police station has been done away with and a modern one put up in the main High Street. On the whole the village of Langley has become more than a village and some of the Langley residents who have lived there all their lives have seen many changes. We have a Free Church in the village and also a really old church, called St Mary's. On the Langley Road, there was a big childrens' orphanage which has now been demolished. Nearby was the Research Station. The cobbler is still there, the business passed on to son from father.

In the village stood a very big house and estate belonging to the late Mr and Mrs Hillier, and every year there was a big fete and sports in the grounds. It has been made into a big convent, with very high walls around.

Now we have a big oil depot at Langley station. The big Hawker airfield has been turned into a Ford's motor factory and recently the new Hotel Inn has gone up on what used to be farm land. On the whole we are now a very modern village with six foster homes on the LCC estate, three in Blandford Road and three in Langley High Street run by the Hammersmith Borough. In each home are seven children of different age groups up to eighteen years old. We have many big modern schools and the area is really built up. But we still have a good many old Langley residents and a few familiar things left in our village.

M.W. Holding, Langley Marish

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes


Education

Langley Marish Parish, with part of Colnbrook Chapelry (Pop. 1,797)

Five Daily Schools, containing 49 males and 66 females, and Two Boarding Schools, about 50 males; these are all educated at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, supported by voluntary contributions; in one of which (commenced 1830) are 31 males and 34 females, who attend the Established Church; the other (commenced 1819) appertains to the Baptist denomination, and consists of 26 males and 36 females.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Stoke Poges

Introduction

Church: St Giles

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 3465

Easting & Northing: 498183

Grid Ref SU980830 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Stoke Poges PARISH St Giles
Stoches NAMES name for Stoke in Domesday Book in 1086
Stokbogies NAMES name for Stoke Poges in 1526
Stoke Pogys NAMES name for Stoke Poges in 1514
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1845
Berry (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Ditton PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 741
1811 838
1821 1073
1831 1252
1841 1528
1851 1501
1861 1600
1871 1850
1881 2150
1891 2356
1901 3175
1911 1433
1921 1701
1931 2110
1941 N/A
1951 2470
1961 3886
1971 4896
1981 4851
1991 4356

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Stoke Poges   Ditton Chapel   Baptisms   1763   1812   Not available   Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Stoke Poges   St Giles   Baptisms   1837   1891   Not available   Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Stoke Poges   St Giles   Baptisms   1564   1763   Not available   Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Stoke Poges   St Giles   Marriages   1564   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Stoke Poges   St Giles   Burials   1564   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROOME GROVE ELDERFIELD TURNER
2 HILL TURNER TURNER GROVE
3 SNAPES BUCKLAND HUGHES GROOME
4 GROME CLARKE DAVIS BUCKLAND
5 RANDALL GROOM DEAN CLARKE
6 WARD TAYLOR STEVENS SMITH
7 WOOD SMITH GROVES DEAN
8 SAUNDERS CLARK BUCKLAND ELDERFIELD
9 FRENCH BUNBY DEVONSHIRE DAVIS
10 GROOM HESTER GROVE TAYLOR

 

Notes

Stoke Poges is situated between Slough and Gerrards Cross. It is an area made up of several scattered hamlets and comprises estates, woodlands and common land.

In 1086 it was known as Stockes and was the meeting place of the Stoke Hundred (one of the Chiltern Hundreds). In 1291 Robert Poges married Amicia de Stoke and the parish became known as Stoke Poges. Until well into the 19th century the southern boundary was the Bath Road and in 1835 Slough was designated in a topographical dictionary as a hamlet in the parish of Stoke Poges.

St Giles church is remote from the village but situated near the Manor House one and a half miles distant. This was probably firstly a Saxon thane's dwelling then an 'embattled' castle of the 14th century and lastly was the Elizabethan Manor house of the 2nd Earl of Huntingdon. Part of the church is Saxon but it is mostly Norman with the Tudor Hastings Chapel as a later addition.

The churchyard is famous for its connection with Thomas Gray the poet who died in 1771 and who there lies buried with his mother. His Elegy written in a Country Churchyard surely one of the best known poems in the English language, is generally supposed to have been written at Stoke Poges as the poet spent much time here with his mother who lived for some years at West End Farm in the village. This, enlarged, became Stoke Court and was the home of the Penn family. It is now the administrative headquarters of an International Pharmaceutical Company and has recently been rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1979.

Adjoining the churchyard is the National Trust Field where stands the monument to Gray erected in 1799 by John Penn, a grandson of the founder of Pennsylvania. This has been restored after an appeal launched by the late Sir John Betjeman in 1977.

James Wyatt's Gothic vicarage was built in 1802 to replace an earlier building which John Penn had demolished as it spoiled his view from Stolce Park, the house he had built in the late 18th century, the old Manor House having fallen into decay. One wing of this is still standing and is occupied as business premises. Stoke Park House is now the headquarters of the Stoke Poges Golf Club and the surrounding parkland forms the championship Golf Course.

Sefton Park originally known as Stoke Farm was built for Lady Molyneux daughter of the Earl of Sefton. Another well-known person who lived there was Lady de Frece, better known as Vesta Tilley the actress. During the Second World War, the Gordon Highlanders' famous 51st division and American G.I.s were quartered there prior to the invasion of Normandy and were visited by many famous war leaders though it was 'hush hush' at the time. After the war Glaxo Laboratories moved in and there developed the Salk vaccine.

In Rogers Lane is the house known as Uplands, built in 1772 to house a lace factory, later becoming the village workhouse and now a gracious family home.
Not far from the vicarage is the Clock House built in 1765 as almshouses to replace the original Hospital (or Almshouses) founded by Lord Hastings in 1557. The oldest house in the village is an early 16th century timber-framed house also now occupied by a business firm.

As Thomas Gray's poem has it the villagers seem mainly to have kept 'the noiseless tenour of their way', in the past being mostly employed on the land or in service in the large houses. The exception seems to have been at the time of the Enclosures in the early part of the last century when the villagers' rights of grazing their animals on the common were extinguished. Between 1810 and 1814 a great struggle went on in the parish — many of the gentry and villagers joined forces to preserve the right of the poor to gather fuel on 200 of the original 460 acres. This is now designated an 'area of special scientific interest' and is still administered by four elected trustees from the village under the chairmanship of the vicar of Stoke Poges as was agreed at the time of Enclosure.

It is interesting to note that the needy still have help with their fuel bills, paid for from funds derived from charges to Public Authorities for such things as telephone poles, gas pipes laid across the common etc.

In a mysterious Census of the Poor of 1832 in the Bodleian Library at Oxford there are reports of the villagers, one being transported for seven years and another 'taken up on suspicion of being concerned in an intended conspiracy to fire the workhouse'.

Folk of good character are mentioned and also men who were 'shady' and 'bosky' i.e. given to drink. Among the craftsmen mentioned are brickmakers, sawyers, wheelwrights, a cordwainer, a smith and an unusual occupation of 'kindler maker'.
At the time of the First World War the population of the village was under 1500 and 48 fell in battle. Now the population is 5,000, made up of all sections of the socio-economic groups who get their livelihoods in London, Slough, Windsor, Heathrow Airport etc. The village contains all types of dwelling and an up to date shopping precinct and although no longer presents an agricultural outlook possesses a strong community spirit.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Stoke Poges, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish includes Ditton, a portion of the town of Slough, and part of the village of Salt Hill. Area, 2,500 acres; population 1,600. The soil is various. Stoke Common consists of about 200 acres of uninclosed land, from which are extensive prospects. The Village is distant 2.75 miles from Slough. The ancient Manor House in Stoke Park has been celebrated as the scene of the poet Gray's “Long Story.” It was built in 1555, by the Earl of Huntington, and was afterwards the seat of Lord Chancellor Hatton; and then of Chief Justice Coke. A wing of the old house still remains near the church, and is occupied by a gamekeeper, the remainder having been pulled down in 1799. The present modern mansion, the seat of Lord Taunton, is in the Italian style, from a design by James Wyatt, and comprises a large square centre with four wings; the north front is ornamented with a colonade of ten Doric columns, and approached by a flight of steps leading to an oval marble hall.


The Stoke Place estate belongs to Colonel Richard Howard Vyse. It became the property and seat of Field-Marshal Sir G. Howard, on whose decease, in 1796, it descended through his only daughter, to his grandson, who was High Sheriff of Bucks in 1830.

The Baylis House estate is the property of the Duke of Leeds, and was formerly the seat of Lord Godolphin. The mansion is large, and was rebuilt in 1695, by Dr. Godolphin, Provost of Eton. The Earl of Rosslyn died here in 1805. Baylis House has been for the last 30 years a Catholic Boarding School for young gentlemen. There is a Chapel in the house in which the services of the Catholic Church are celebrated, and to which the public are admitted.

The Manor of Ditton is the property of the Duke of Buccleuch. Sir John Moylyns had a castellated seat in his park at Ditton; and on its site Sir Ralph Winwood, Secretary of State to James I., built a noble mansion, which was destroyed by fire in 1812. It was rebuilt in 1813 by Elizabeth, Duchess of Buccleuch, to whom the estate had been bequeathed by Lord Beaulieu, her uncle, husband of the daughter and heir of John, Duke of Montagu, to whose family the estate passed by marriage from the Winwoods.

The Benifice is a Vicarage, rated at £7 17s, and now worth £430 a year. Patron and impropriator, the Duke of Leeds, Vicar, Rev. John Straw. Tithes commuted. The Parsonage Farm, a subordinate manor, was purchased by Baron Godolphin, about 1800, of John Penn, Esq., of Stoke Park.

There is a Chapel of Ease at the hamlet of Ditton; and another about 1.5 mile from the parish church. The Vicarage House is a large and good building. The National Schools were built in 1846, and are endowed with £30 per annum, arising from the bequests of Mary Salter, Margaret Todd, Mrs Parker Sedding, and the Rev. Arthur Bold. About 100 children attend. Lady Moyneaux maintains another school in which about 50 children are educated.

Notes

Gerrards Cross was a very small village, and consisted mainly of the houses surrounding the common. The village shop, owned by Mr Wood, was adjacent to the French Horn public house and Mr Wood was also the baker. His daughter, Mrs Newman, with her husband opened a baker's shop near Gerrards Cross station after the railway was constructed from London to the Midlands.
The village school still stands, close to the Pack-horse public house, and the Bull on the western end of the common was the stopping place for the four-in-hand coach which ran from London to Oxford.

Jesse Dell, a carrier,' made the journey from Chalfont to London three times a week, summer and winter and was frequently called on to take material from Finsbury Park to Chalfont House.

It was great fun crossing the water splash in Chalfont Village, which remained until the advent of the motor car.

Besides being a builder, Mr Knight of Stoke Common was a wheelwright and undertaker—there was always a coffin being made in the carpenter's shop and a blacksmith regularly employed fitting the iron rims to the wagon wheels and making the various brackets and fittings required for the construction of the farm wagons. There were also two pit-sawyers constantly sawing tree trunks into planks.

Oil lamps were in use until the electricity supply was brought to Stoke Common after the First World War.
Collum Green Road was originally called Parish Lane and then One Pin Lane. Hedgerley Park was owned by Mrs Stevenson, and her farm bailiff lived at Colly Hill Farm (now a house called Tara). We had to go there each morning to get the milk.
I forget the name of the owner of Fulmer Hall but well remember the tea and firework display given by the owner on the occasion when his son was released from prison for his part in the Jameson Raid on the Transvaal. It must have been about 1898.

The only transport at that time was provided by Mr Glenister who lived at Mount Pleasant, Hedgerley Dean. He had a horse and waggonette and made the journey from Hedgerley to Slough morning and afternoon in the summer and mornings in the winter. He was a fine-looking man, resembling Edward VII, and he used to announce his approach with a tune on his horn. He would undertake to deliver or collect parcels in Slough and make purchases if required.
After the First World War, a Mr Potter and a Mr Clark operated small motor buses between Stoke Common and Slough and gave a very efficient service. Eventually they were displaced by Premier Bus Co., then the GWR, and later by London Transport. There was no shop at Stoke Common and the nearest doctor lived at Farnham Common. The Fox and Pheasant public house had been there for half a century and its nearest neighbours were the Sefton Arms (now the Six Bells) and the One Pin.
We frequently walked to Burnham Beeches, which to us meant the Plain, where there was a wooden hut from which sweets and ginger beer could be obtained. Nearby was a donkey stand where one could have a ride for one penny.
The Fair visited Stoke Common every year in the late summer—it was quite an event.

Honor Gamble,   Stoke Poges & Wexham

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

The school in School Lane was originally the school for the boys and the girls of Stoke Poges and Wexham. It was a Board School, built in the 1870's, and replaced the old school in Rogers Lane. It was three schools in one, an infants for all up to the age of seven, and for above that age two segregated schools for boys and girls.
Some children went to school when they were only three years old; many left at the age of ten and when they left school the girls usually went into service. There was nothing else for them to do. School was not free. The children each paid one penny a week. Corporal punishment was administered where and when necessary. One little girl was taken into the cloakroom and soundly spanked by teacher because she said she did not want to go to school. That little girl is now eighty-five years old and it is her most vivid recollection of her school days.

Empire Day was always celebrated with songs in. the morning, with the Union Jack flying, and a holiday in the afternoon. May Day meant dancing round the maypole in the playground. Some children carried a maypole to the houses saying 'First of May is Garland Day, Please remember the Maypole' hoping to collect pennies.
On Sundays they went to Sunday School. Before St Andrews Church was built, the Methodists met in a building in Rogers Lane near the present village hall. There are houses there now. The Sunday School outing was usually to Burnham Beeches. The children rode there in farm wagons and sometimes even in coal wagons. Food and drink were supplied.

Every year there was a Christmas party organised by the vicar and curate. It was held in the Parish Hall, formerly the old school in Rogers Lane, and there was the usual Christmas tree and small gifts. Bonfire night was always celebrated with a huge bonfire on the common opposite the Fox and Pheasant.

Village shops supplied most of the everyday requirements—butcher, baker and post office and the general store. There were three postal deliveries a day—and a cottage loaf cost 3Vfcd. Some people fetched their milk direct from a farm. Others had it delivered—the milkmen having churns from which they measured the quantity required with his long-handled measure.

There was no shortage of water in the village. It was drawn from wells or pumps. For those who had no other supply of drinking water, there was a pump opposite the present Junior School in Rogers Lane. One well had frogs in it but some wells were fresh spring water and always pure.

Most of the men in the village worked on the big estates. In winter, when the weather was too severe for outside building work, men collected sheets of ice from the ponds and lakes, using tongs, and stacked the sheets of ice in the ice wells belonging to the big houses, Stoke Court and Stoke Place.

There was a fair amount of poaching of pheasants, partridges and pigeons. The pub would pay fourpence a rabbit. The skins of rabbits were sold to the rag-and-bone man. Those who could catch sparrows, which were a pest, received threepence a dozen and the sparrows were made into pies.

The chimney sweep charged sixpence for an ordinary chimney: he had a boy to climb the large chimneys. There were twenty-one chimneys at Stoke Court.
Some of the old roads which still exist today have new names. Duffield Lane used to be called Back Road, Templewood Lane was Donkey Road, Chapel Lane was Watery Lane, Hockley Lane was Green Lane, Plough Lane was Cock Lane, Farthing Green Lane was Church Road. It is said that Shaggy Calf Road was so named because a headless shaggy calf ran up the road.

To commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria the Jubilee Oak was planted—some say by the Queen herself—at the corner of Church Road where it crosses Park Road. All the school children attended the ceremony and sang songs.

Members of Stoke Poges & Wexham

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

 

Education

Stoke Poges Parish, with part of Slough (Pop. 1,252)

Six Daily Schools, one contains 64 children, endowed with ú30 per annum and a school-house, for which 30 males and 10 females are instructed; 10 others are paid for by the parish, the rest by their parents; two others respectively contain 27 and 18 children, supported by two individuals who have built school-houses, and pay all annual expenses, (the children in these Schools attend also on Sundays); in the other three, 35 children are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Boarding Schools, respectively containing 15 and 28 males, whose education is paid for by their parents; the last School appertains to Roman Catholics; five of the daily Schools, with 95 children, have commenced since 1818.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

 

Taplow

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1762

Easting & Northing: 491182

Grid Ref SU910820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Taplow PARISH St Nicholas
Clifden NAMES name for Cliveden in 1826
Hartley Court Mote NAMES name for Hardicanute's Moat in 17th C
Thapeslau NAMES name for Taplow in Domesday Book in 1086
Topler NAMES name for Taplow in 1675
Toplo NAMES name for Taplow in 1571
Toplowe NAMES name for Taplow in 1624
Amerden Grove PLACE within the parish
Cliveden PLACE within the parish
Dilehurst (lost) PLACE within the parish
Huntercombe House PLACE within the parish
Lent PLACE within the parish
Pennlands (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Summerlins Wood PLACE within the parish
West Town (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 422
1811 592
1821 586
1831 647
1841 744
1851 704
1861 811
1871 1028
1881 1063
1891 1029
1901 1056
1911 1127
1921 1502
1931 1031
1941 N/A
1951 2228
1961 2183
1971 2329
1981 2172
1991 1637

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Taplow   St Nicolas   Baptisms   1604   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Taplow   St Nicolas   Marriages   1616   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Taplow   St Nicolas   Burials   1605   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RUSSELL BROWN BROWN BROWN
2 PALMER CLARK SIMMONDS SIMMONDS
3 JONES ALLEN JAYCOCK SMITH
4 GROVE ALDRIDGE SMITH JAYCOCK
5 FLATT SMITH KENT MEADS
6 EDMONDS LUCAS MEADS JONES
7 POOLE NEIGHBOUR HARRIS KENT
8 HOWE MARCH JONES HARRIS
9 BECKE READ FIELD NEWMAN
10 CHIPS BISHOP SAUNDERS FIELD

 

Description

A settlement at Taplow has been in existence since the Stone Age, as shown by the finding of artifacts of that period. Its name is derived from that of a Saxon chief, Tappa, whose burial mound is evident. Saxon objects have been excavated and these, along with earlier finds, are now housed in the British Museum.

Taplow has remained a village, with its church, school, hall, inn and some old dwelling houses around the green. High above the beautiful stretch of the Thames known as Cliveden Reach, where the river separates Taplow from Maidenhead, is Taplow Court with its well laid out gardens. The original manor house was on this site, the estate was more extensive, including what is today Cliveden estate.

In the grounds of Taplow Court is Bapsey Pond where, it is claimed, St Birinius baptised his followers in Roman times. This is near the burial mound where a service is held at dawn on Easter Day. The church, St Nicolas, stood on the estate until 1828, when it was demolished and rebuilt on its present site in the centre of the village. It is one of several churches served by a team ministry.

The manor house changed in appearance through the ages. In the 17th century it ceased to be Crown property, being sold to Sir William Hampson in the reign of James I. He in turn sold off the part which became Cliveden. It was last renovated by Pascoe Grenfell in 1855 to give it the Gothic appearance we see today. It is now used for industrial prposes. What beautiful surroundings in which to work!

So was established an area of large houses, with a village of cottagers serving the big houses. In the 19th and early 20th centuries there were four shops, a post office and the inn, the Oak and Saw. Conditions in the village have changed — shops and post office have disappeared, but services are infrequent and the railway station, though nearer than originally, sited as it was at the Dumbbell Hotel, is still a distance away. Quite a lot of building has been carried out since the Second World War, the houses mainly occupied by reasonably affluent people who work away from the village, many commuting to the City. The station has always carried commuters to London. In early times noble Lords travelled to the Houses of Parliament, hence the name of Noblemen's Corner. Just after the First World War the local village simpleton noted that they all wore bowler hats. He asked the village bobby whether he too could wear one, and was told that he needed a licence!

The present Cliveden House, the third on the site, was designed by Sir Charles Barry. It was bought from the Duke of Westminster by William Waldorf, later Lord Astor, in 1893. He had the beautiful water gardens laid out. It continued to be lived in by his family until 1966, though the estate had been given to the National Trust in 1942. Before the Second World War Lord Astor's son and daughter-in-law, Nancy, made it the centre for the literary and political society of the day, 'The Cliveden Set'. There were scandalous tales told both at that time and earlier, in Edwardian times, when there was a row of houses let to ladies who frequented the famous Skindles hotel on the riverside.

Stamford University leased part of the house from the National Trust for fourteen years. It is now a very luxurious, expensive hotel.
In the Cliveden estate the Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital was built during the Second World War, though in the Great War there had been a hospital unit established there. After the war it became a Health Service hospital until 1984. There was great sadness when it was closed, as it was very much a 'family' hospital.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Taplow, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 1,920 acres; population 811. The parish is separated by the Thames from Berkshire; the Great Western Railway passes through it; and within its boundary is the Maidenhead Station on that line. The village, which occupies a pleasant situation 1.5 E from Maidenhead, is lighted with gas.

Taplow Court, the seat of C.P. Grenfell, Esq., is a very old mansion. The Earl of Orkney improved it; and the present owner restored the old parts, added the principle appartments to the south-west, rebuilt the four fronts, and most of the offices. It is now a splendid pile, of red brick with cut stone finishings in the Tudor style. From the centre rises a lofty square tower which contains a water tank; and two of the angles are ornamental with spirelets. A porch and vestibule leads to a beautiful Norman Saloon (built by the Earl of Orkney) 38ft by 16ft. Here are polished marble pillars supporting eight large ornamental arches; and above (reached by the great staircase) by polished marble shafts. The lofty roof is formed of oak and rolled plate glass. The principal apartments in the house are spacious and well proportioned.

The Rectory is rated at £11 18s 9d. and returned at £329 per annum. Patron, the Lord Chancellor; Rector, Rev. Charles Whateley, who is also Rural Dean of the Deanery of Burnham. At the inclosure of the parish, land was allotted in lieu of tithes. There are about 196 acres of glebe.

Education

Taplow Parish (Pop. 647)

One Daily School (commenced 1833), consisting of 15 males and 13 females, who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Upton cum Chalvey

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1943

Easting & Northing: 496179

Grid Ref SU960790 Click to see map

Places

Places

NameTypeNote
Upton cum Chalvey PARISH St Mary
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Windsor Road. First Mentioned: 1891. Built 1905
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST Church Street. First Mentioned: 1852
Plymouth Brethren NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1880
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST William Street. First Mentioned: 1848. Built 1877
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST Ledgers Road. First Mentioned: 1847
Bayliss PLACE within the parish
Chalvey PLACE within the parish
Eton Union Central Workhouse PLACE workhouse in Albert St. now Upton Hospital
Merton Grange PLACE within the parish
Mirk PLACE within the parish
Salt Hill PLACE within the parish
Slough (Part) PLACE hamlet in parish, now a parish in a town
Upton PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note Slough
1801 N/A
1811 N/A
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 N/A
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 8713
1901 N/A
1911 14982
1921 20285
1931 33530
1941 N/A
1951 66471
1961 80811
1971 87075
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Slough   St Paul   Baptisms   1899   1901   Not available   Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Upton cum Chalvey   St Laurence   Baptisms   1539   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Upton cum Chalvey   St Mary   Marriages   1860   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Upton cum Chalvey   St Laurence   Marriages   1539   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Slough   Congregational (URC?)   Burials   1859   1914   Not available   Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Upton cum Chalvey   St Laurence   Burials   1539   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Slough   Congregational(URC?)   Burials   1859   1914   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PITT PITT SMITH SMITH
2 BELL SMITH STEVENS BROWN
3 WOODWARD HOUSE BROWN PITT
4 HUSE BROWN JOEL STEVENS
5 BAVIN WEBB HARRIS JOEL
6 READE GRANTHAM HOWSE HARRIS
7 PURSER BALDWIN WILDER HOWSE
8 NEWINGTON HUNT CLARK CLARK
9 DUCK PURSER ATKINS WILDER
10 BALL JOEL KNIGHT PURSER

 

Description

Description of Upton-cum-Chalvey from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Upton parish includes Chalvey, nearly the whole of Slough and part of Salt Hill. The area is 1,950 acres; population (including 214 persons in the Eton Union Workhouse), 4,690; rateable value £17,613. The village adjoins Slough and is 3 miles N.W. by W from Colnbrook. There are about 126 acres of this parish in Bulstrode Park.

Upton Court, near the church, and now a farm house (an old fashioned structure) is attached to a Manor-farm belonging to Lord Harewood. Upton Park, which was opened in 1842, consists of about 33 acres of tastefully laid out grounds, and about 30 good residences. There are two lodges to it with a reading-room library, and billiard-room.

The Vicarage is in the gift of the Lord Chancellor and incumbency of the Rev. Edward Thomas Champnes. Impropriator, William Boncey, Esq. The tithes have been commuted. The living is rated at £6 17s., and worth about £260 per annum.

Slough is a long and scattered town, on the Bath road, and, as before stated, is mostly in Upton parish; a small portio of it only being in Stoke Poges. It is distant 1.5 mile N. from Eton, and 2 miles N. from Windsor, and 21 miles W. from London. There was formerly a Market here for cattle. The town has been lighted with gas since 1847. The Slough Station of the Great Western Railway is close to one end of the town, and near it is a handsome hotel; there is a branch line to Eton and Windsor from this station. The Independent Chapel was erected in 1853, at a cost of £2,300; the Rev G. Robbins is the pastor. The Wesleyan Chapel, built in 1847, cost about £400. There are National Schools fro boys and girls attended by nearly 200 children; and there is also a British School. The Mechanics Institute numbers up to 200 members, and the library consists of nearly 800 volumes. The tastefully laid out Nursery Grounds at the east end of the town add considerably to the beauty of the place.

A plain brick house on the Windsor road, called Ivy House, was the residence of Herschel, the astronomer; and in the garden of this house his great telescope was set up. Here most of the discoveries of that great man were made, including that of the new primary planet, Uranus. The Workhouse of the Eton Poor Law Union is situated in Slough, and is a large brick building, fitted to accommodate 400 inmates.

Chalvey is a large scattered village, about 1 mile from Upton old church, and a like distance from Slough. Here a Church has been erected (1860-61), at the cost of about £2,000, on a site given by Mrs Beauchamp of Finefield House. It is a neat little Gothic edifice, of flint, with stone and brick facings, and consists of a nave, and a turret at the west end carrying two bells.

A National School is to be built near the church. There is here, at present, an Infant School. A Dissenting Chapel here, built by the Independents in 1835, has been sold to the Primitive Methodists. A small Temperance Hall was erected in the village in 1848.

 

Education

Upton Parish, with Chalvey Hamlet, part of Salt Hill, and part of Slough (Pop. 1,502)

Two Daily Schools, one contains 9 males and 11 females, the other (commenced
1821), 2 males and 10 females, in both of which the children are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Day and Sunday Schools, one a Lancasterian School (commenced 1828), attended by 70 males daily, and 40 males and 40 females on Sundays: this School has no charitable assistance at present, and is solely supported by weekly payments of twopence from each scholar; the other (commenced 1833), is supported by voluntary contributions, and contains 45 females.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Wexham

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 748

Easting & Northing: 498182

Grid Ref SU980820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Wexham PARISH St Mary
Black Park PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 172
1811 178
1821 154
1831 181
1841 175
1851 201
1861 196
1871 218
1881 172
1891 231
1901 239
1911 253
1921 242
1931 409
1941 N/A
1951 1818
1961 6698
1971 6878
1981 1550
1991 2424

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Wexham   St Mary   Baptisms   1604   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wexham   St Mary   Marriages   1604   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wexham   St Mary   Burials   1604   1941   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE ROBINSON BUCKLAND BUCKLAND
2 GREENE DEAN BOVINGDON WINTER
3 BAVIN SEXTON HARDING GROVE
4 KNOLTON WELLS HOLDSHIP ROBINSON
5 CARTER RIDE WINTER BOVINGDON
6 WARD ROSE CORDERY TURNER
7 HOLE GROVE COLLINS HARDING
8 GANSON GREEN BROCK BROCK
9 SMITH SMITH TURNER DEAN
10 FELLOW MITCHELL PENN HOLDSHIP

 

Education

Wexham Parish (Pop. 181)

Two Infant Schools, one contains 8 males and 7 females, the other (commenced 1831), 5 males and 3 females.

Two Daily Schools, one (commenced 1825), contains 16 males, the other (commenced 1831), 11 females. All the above children, except five, who are paid for by Major Bent, are instructed at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information