This section also includes those parishes in the south of the county and north of the Thames.

Eton

Introduction

Eton Parish

Church: St John the Evangelist

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 786

Easting & Northing: 496177

Grid Ref SU960770 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Eton PARISH St John the Evangelist
Bovenie NAMES name for Boveney in Domesday Book in 1086
Brockess NAMES name for The Brocas in 1569
Eaton NAMES name for Eton in 1546
Ettone NAMES name for Eton in Domesday Book in 1086
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Eton Wick. First Mentioned: c1800
Barnes Pool Bridge PLACE within the parish
Bell Farm PLACE North of Eton Wick
Boveney PLACE St Mary Magalene church
Colenorton Brook PLACE within the parish
Eton College PLACE school in parish
Eton Wick PLACE St John the Baptist built 1867
Eton Wick PLACE Village in parish of Eton
South Field PLACE within the parish
The Brocas PLACE within the parish
Tilson Bridge PLACE within the parish
Timbralls PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 2026
1811 2279
1821 2475
1831 3232
1841 3609
1851 3796
1861 3122
1871 3261
1881 3984
1891 2955
1901 3666
1911 3714
1921 3893
1931 2511
1941 N/A
1951 3247
1961 3894
1971 3956
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Eton   St John Evang, St John Bapt & Sch Chapel   Baptisms   1598   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Eton   St John Evang, St John Bapt & Sch Chapel   Marriages   1604   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Eton   St John Evang, St John Bapt & Sch Chapel   Burials   1603   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

}

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BELL SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 JOHNSON ATKINS BROWN BROWN
3 SMITH CARTER TAYLOR CARTER
4 BUTLER WILLIAMS STEVENS STEVENS
5 WEST WEBB WHITE WHITE
6 CUTLER PIPER CANNON ATKINS
7 COX CUTLER CARTER TAYLOR
8 WOODWARD WHITE COX WILLIAMS
9 SEXTON STEVENS GRAY COX
10 ALDRIDGE ROBERTS DAVIS CANNON

 

Description

Description of Eton from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Eton is separated from Windsor by the Thames. Area 783 acres; population 3,122 (exclusive of above 800 boys of the College); rateable value £10,915. The place is situated half a mile north of Windsor, 1.5 mile S. from Slough, and 23 miles W. by S. from London. The town consists of one long street, well paved and lighted, under the superentendence of a Local Board of Health, established in 1848. The houses are in general well and neatly built; and there are mainly boarding houses for students, the keepers or proprietors of which are called prescriptively "Domine" or "Dame" according to their sex. The river is crossed by a neat iron bridge placed upon stone piers. Petty Sessions are held here every alternate Friday.

The College. Eton is chiefly distinguished for its great College, which ever since its foundation, has held the first position amongst the public schools in England. This famous seat of learning was founded by King Henry VI., for the support and education of poor indigent boys intended for the church, and rge celebrated William of Wykeham originated the plan of it. The foundation charter was dated at Windsor 12th Sept., 1441, arrangements having been previously made with the Bishop of Lincoln, for the appropriation of the church of Eton to the intended college; and the first stone of the college was laid in the foundation of the chapel in July, 1441.

Boverney

Description of Boverney, J. J. Sheahan, 1861

Boverney is termed a Liberty, and contains 480 acres, and 152 souls. The hamlet is small, and situated 2 miles west from Eton, and three miles south from Burnham village on the banks of the Thames. Boverney seems to have formerly included West Town, and in the reign of King Henry VIII to have been a separate manor belonging to the family of Paule, of Braywick, anciently the estate of Sir Reginald Bray. It afterwards came to the families of Lovelace, Dayrell, Villiers and Eyres. The liberty now belongs to Robert Harvey, Esq., Edward Evans Esq., and the Rev. Henry Palmer.

There is an ancient Chapel of Ease served from Eton College, by arrangement with the Vicar of Burnham. It is dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, and consists of a nave and chancel under one roof, with a modern bell-turret at the west end. The edifice has been modernised. An Act of Parliament passed in 1737, for making Boverney a distinct living, but the want of a sufficient endowment prevented it from taking effect.

Other notes.

In 1911 the chapelry was transferred from the parish of Burnham to the parish of Eton. The church is now managed by a charity.  

 

Education

Eton Parish (Pop. 3,232)

Five Daily Schools,

One whereof is endowed for 60 males and 30 females, by Mark Antony Porney; the master's salary is £59 per annum, with the privilege of taking extra scholars, of which he has 20, who are paid for by their parents; mistress's salary, £38 per annum, with the like privilege. At present she has 12 females, paid for by their parents. A house is also provided for the master and mistress, and when vacancies occur in the foundation, children are invariably chosen from the Sunday School.

The other four contain 28 males and 55 females, who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

N.B. The Collegiate School founded by King Henry VI. for 70 scholars, is not included in the above.

One Sunday School, wherein 62 males and 17 females, receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Farnham Royal

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1664

Easting & Northing: 496183

Grid Ref SU960830 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Farnham Royal PARISH St Mary
Farnam Vardon NAMES name for Farnham Royal in 1532
Farnehame Ryall NAMES name for Farnham Royal in 1535
Ferneham NAMES name for Farnham in Domesday Book in 1086
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1829. Later church hall
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1849. Rebuilt 1867
Salt Hill (Part) PLACE within the parish
Seer Green PLACE hamlet in parish until 1847

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 550
1811 624
1821 686
1831 777
1841 792
1851 787
1861 817
1871 884
1881 1042
1891 1053
1901 1162
1911 1632
1921 1551
1931 1656
1941 N/A
1951 2571
1961 3563
1971 N/A
1981 4867
1991 5172

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Farnham Royal   St Mary   Baptisms   1635   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Farnham Royal   St Mary   Marriages   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Farnham Royal   St Mary   Burials   1635   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WALTER COOK WHEELER WILLIAMSON
2 PARKER WILLIAMSON WILLIAMSON HUGHES
3 GRYMSDALL ROBINSON BROWN ROBINSON
4 GRYMSDALE HUGHES HILL WHEELER
5 KINGHAM PERRYMAN HUGHES COOK
6 BARTON STEVENS DEVONSHIRE BROWN
7 CRANWELL NORMAN JAMES HILL
8 ROBINSON CRANWELL BOWLER DEVONSHIRE
9 PERRYMAN LANGTON COX BOWLER
10 INGLE WALTER PUSEY PUSEY

 

Notes

Farnham Common lies in the parish of Farnham Royal. It covers an area of some 2.5 miles and has a population of approximately 6,000.
Farnham Royal was the main village with its church of St Mary's, shops, cottages and village pump situated in the centre junction of the cross roads. Farnham Common was known as 'Up End', being the common land of the parish where the livestock was grazed at certain times of the year. As this common area became more populated it became known as Farnham Common.

Farnham Common is on the border of Burnham Beeches, the well known Beech Forest owned by the City of London, having been given to the people of London as a place in the country for their recreation and pleasure. In the 1920s it was very common for coach loads of Londoners to come down for the day at weekends having tea at the tea rooms and enjoying the donkey rides.

A few of the large old houses still remain such as Yew Place, Farnham Park (once called The Chase) and Caldicott. Yew Place was formerly known as The Rectory, part of which dates back to the time of King John. The original farmhouse was given to a coachman in the service of the Earl of Warwick.
The Chase, now known as Farnham Park, was owned by Mr Carr Gomme, a very influential member of the community, being one of the main organisers of fund-raisers for the building of St John's Church. The house passed into the hands of Sir Gomer Berry, later Lord Kemsley, who had the organ dismantled from Farnham Park and gave it to St John's Church. Farnham Park is now the renowned Farnham Park Rehabilitation Centre presently owned by the East Berkshire Health Authority.

Caldicott is a very imposing house situated on the edge of Burnham Beeches and was once owned by Mrs Harvey who gave money for the extension of Farnham Common Village Hall. Caldicott is now a Boys Preparatory School.

A few names of note who have been associated with Farnham Common have been the artist Rex Whistler's mother, who lived in The Small House in Burnham Beeches; J. M. Barrie, the author of Peter Pan and Enid Blyton, the children's author. In Burnham Beeches there is a large beech tree under which Mendelssohn used to sit and compose some of his works in 'peaceful splendour'. Joan Hammond, the opera singer, lived in the part of the village known as Egypt. The Moore family live in the village and hold the record of three generations of one family representing Great Britain in the Olympic Games, Major George Moore having competed in 1948, Lieut. Col. John Moore, his son, in 1956, 1960 and 1964 and Lieut. Mark Moore, his grandson, in 1984. Lieut. Col. John Moore received on O.B.E. for his services to skiing.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Farnham Royal from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

 This parish, including Seer Green and Hedgerley Dean, extends over an area of 2,910 acres, and contains 1,298 inhabitants. Rateable value, £4,947. The Great Western Railway crosses the parish at Salt Hill. The surface is pleasantly undulated, and the scenery abounds with interests. The village, which contains some good residences, is distant from Colnbrook 4.5 miles N.W., 2.5 N.W. from Slough, and 3.5 N. from Eton.

The rectory is in the gift of Eton College, and is rated at £12 16s. 0.5d. The glebe lands consist of about 300 acres; and the tithes were commuted for £304 17s 8d. Annual value, £539. The Rev. S. F. Marshall is the Rector. The advowson was given by the Crown to Eton College, about the 1720.

Salt hill is a hamlet and respectable village 1 mile W. from Slough, and 1.5 mile S. from Farnham Royal. Nearly the whole of the hamlet is in this parish, but portions of it are in Stoke Poges and Upton. The "Mons" whence the long celebrated Eton festival called the Montem, took its name, is situated in Upton parish. This ceremony of "Ad Montem" is now numbered with the things that are past. Salt Hill was noted for the splendour of its post-inns, before the "iron ways" superseded stage-coaches and post-chaises. There is yet a large hotel here.

 

Education

Farnham Royal Parish (including part of Salt Hill) (Pop. 777)

Two Day and Sunday Schools, attended by 56 males and 28 females daily, and 39 males and 36 females on Sundays, supported by subscription and small weekly payments from the children. Rooms were built for the above Schools by subscription, in 1822, when they were placed on their present footing.

Hedgerley-Dean Hamlet (Pop. 171)

One Daily School (commenced 1830), in which 5 males and 7 females are instructed at the expense of their parents;

One Sunday School, attached to Independent Dissenters (commenced 1821), consisting of 23 males and 37 females, supported by voluntary contributions.

Seer-Green Hamlet (Pop. 245)

Two Daily Schools, one contains 20 males and 4 females, supported by Lady Young and Mr. and Miss Dupree; the other 22 females, partly supported by Lady Young, in aid of payment by the parents of the children.

One Sunday School, in which 40 children of both sexes are gratuitously instructed. These Schools have all commenced since 1818.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Fulmer

Introduction

Church: St James

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1895

Easting & Northing: 499185

Grid Ref SU990850 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Fulmer PARISH St James
Fullmer NAMES name for Fulmer in 1766

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 292
1811 262
1821 340
1831 391
1841 355
1851 328
1861 351
1871 412
1881 428
1891 349
1901 340
1911 255
1921 279
1931 401
1941 N/A
1951 557
1961 602
1971 573
1981 506
1991 468

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Fulmer   St James   Baptisms   1658   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Fulmer   St James   Marriages   1605   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Fulmer   St James   Burials   1658   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ARNOLD SPRING BOWLER SPRING
2 NEWTON GROVE SPRING BOWLER
3 TRUMPER ARCHER NEWELL FOSTER
4 LITTLER ROSE FOSTER PARKER
5 LITTLE FOSTER BROWN BROWN
6 HARVEY ALLEN RIDDLE NEWELL
7 ALLEN TURNER PARKER RIDDLE
8 SNAPES BIGGS DANCER DANCER
9 PRATT WINTER DALEY SMITH
10 MUMFORD TREADAWAY OSBORNE ARNOLD

 

Notes

Nestling between two motorways, the M25 and M40, Fulmer is on the surface the epitome of an English village. It has its winding village street flanked by the village shop and post office, the church, the public house, The Black Horse, and the village hall. There is even a village school which takes children up to eight years old. However, the majority of the people who live in the village do not work there.

There is one farm given over to sheep and intensive egg and pig production, an equestrian centre which also houses a branch of the Riding for the Disabled Association and the Muschamp Stud where German Trakhener horses are bred and a very successful dressage competition is held every year. There are numerous large mansions in and around the village, but these have mostly been turned into flats or in one case become the laboratories of a pharmaceutical research company.

Much of the social life of the village is organised by the Fulmer Family Social Club. In addition to Fulmer Day in June when there are stalls, entertainments, sports and a carnival procession, they also organise other social activities like a Christmas social and the fireworks on November 5th.
The Black Horse is the only public house in the area. It started life as a building hut when the church was built in 1610 and was used for the local petty sessions as early as 1681. The present building has been standing — or sinking as there are no solid foundations — on the site since the late 18th century with additions in 1926 and 1952.

Considering Fulmer's closeness to London it is extremely lucky to be surrounded by beautiful and varied countryside.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Description

1861 description of Fulmer from J. J.  Sheahan.

The inclosed land in this parish is about 1390 acres, and there are upwards of 360 acres of common land, forming part of Gerrard's Cross Heath; population 351; rateable value, £1,978. The place derives its name from a mere or lake in the lower grounds - now a swampy plain laid out for the cultivation of water cresses. The village lies 4 miles N.N.E. from Slough, 4½ S.E.from Beaconsfield, and 2 miles S from Gerrard's Cross. It is an exceedingly neat place, and has in it, and on the verge of the common, half-a-dozen gentlemen's villas, all neat houses of modern build.

Education

Fulmer Parish (Pop. 391)

One Daily School (commenced 1823,) containing 20 children of both sexes, who are instructed at the expense of their parents;

One Sunday School, with about 40 children, supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Gerrards Cross

Introduction

Church: St James

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 2102

Easting & Northing: 500188

Grid Ref TQ000880 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Gerrards Cross PARISH St James
Jarrets Cross NAMES name for Gerrard's Cross in 1761
Bulstrode (Park) PLACE within the parish
Prestwick PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 N/A
1811 N/A
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 N/A
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 1612
1921 2208
1931 2942
1941 N/A
1951 3998
1961 5851
1971 6524
1981 6733
1991 6908

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Gerrards Cross   St James   Baptisms   1861   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Gerrards Cross   St James   Marriages   1861   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Gerrards Cross   St James   Burials   1861   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 COPLAND HONE DANCER DANCER
2 WILSHIRE TREDAWAY LANGSTONE LANGSTONE
3 YOUNG JUXON CHIPPS CHIPPS
4 WRIGHT TREVELYAN SUTTON SUTTON
5 WOODS HARRIS PARKER PARKER
6 WOODRUFF FLETCHER SCOTT SCOTT
7 WOODLEY COPLAND HIGBED HIGBED
8 WOOD WILSON GEORGE GEORGE
9 WOLLACOTT PINER COCK COCK
10 WITHAM BLINCO CLARK CLARK

 

Description

Description of Gerrards Cross as a Chapelry from Sheahan, 1861.

This is a highly respectable place, and consists of many genteel residences, and some cottages built on the verge of an extensive common, about 4 miles N.W. from Uxbridge, 4 miles S.E. from Beaconsfield, 6 miles N.E. from Slough, and 2 miles S. from Chalfont St. Peter.

Gerrard's Cross Common is a flat plain of nearly 1,000 acres, mostly covered with heather and furze; extending into four or five parishes, but chiefly in those of Fulmer and Chalfont St. Peter. The turnpike road from London to Oxford crosses it, dividing the old parishes of Fulmer and Chalfont - the common land on the south side of the road being in the former parish, and the land on the north side belonging mostly to Chalfont. This London and Oxford road extends nearly a mile across the heath, and is intersected at right angles by a road from Chalfont to Slough and Windsor; but it is not known why the cross roads received the prefix of Gerrard, or Jarret, as the name is sometimes spelt. The houses which compose the village of Gerrard's Cross are scattered on a road running round one side of the edge of the common, (forming a bow having the London road as its string) and extending about 1.5 mile in length. Near the French Horn Inn (which is in Fulmer, on the London road at the point at which that road touches the common) the parishes of Fulmer, Chalfont St Peter, and Langley Marish meet.

Hedgerley

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1748

Easting & Northing: 496187

Grid Ref SU960870 Click to see map

Places

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Hedgerley PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Hogeley NAMES name for Hedgerley in 1535
Hogely NAMES name for Hedgerley in 1537
Hugely NAMES name for Hedgerley in 1560
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Farnham Rd, Hedgerley Dean. First Mentioned: 1820
Hedgerley Green PLACE within the parish
Oak End PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 224
1811 306
1821 357
1831 258
1841 346
1851 346
1861 380
1871 417
1881 336
1891 357
1901 347
1911 335
1921 357
1931 336
1941 N/A
1951 508
1961 846
1971 894
1981 855
1991 832

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Hedgerley   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1539   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Hedgerley   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1540   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Hedgerley   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1539   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RANDALL PUSEY PINER PINER
2 FULMER SMITH DANCER DANCER
3 HUNT NASH PUSEY PUSEY
4 BALDWYN WRIGHT GUTTERIDGE NASH
5 FEILD SUTTON HEALEY SMITH
6 WHITE CRAFT HEALY BLINCO
7 FOSTER DANCER BLINCO GUTTERIDGE
8 WEST PINER NASH BOWDEN
9 NASH TURNER SMITH HEALY
10 WILLIAMS STREET HOOK HEALEY

Notes

The name Hedgerley dates from the time when the southern slopes of the Chilterns were colonised by early Saxon settlers.

Hedgerley was famous for its bricks. The brickmaking industry here probably dates back to medieval times but it had its heyday in the 17th and 18 th centuries when several writers extolled the merits of Hedgerley loam. Its popularity resulted from the fact that the loam contained a large amount of sand and so made very good firebricks. Hedgerley bricks were used to build the Box Tunnel in Wiltshire on the main Bristol line of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunei was in charge of the operation. Before the end of the First World War, when the Slough Trading Estate was built, brickmaking was the only form of employment in the area, other than agriculture or market gardening. But sadly brickmaking in Hedgerley came to an end just before the Second World War.

Many famous names have been associated with the village including Judge Jeffreys, whose children's marriages are recorded in the church registers. Well known Quakers are also said to have met in the Old Quaker House in the mid 17th century, and suffered harassment from Judge Ambrose Bennet who, locally, was more infamous than Judge Jeffreys. Another man of note was John Hill, the son of Theophilus Hill, Rector of Hedgerley from 1743-1746. The Shell Book of Firsts notes John Hill as the first daily newspaper columnist. He was the first biologist to introduce Linnaeus' binominal system into English science, making him the originator of many generic and specific names. He wrote the first English book on honey, and pioneering works on geology and gemstones. He was also the first man to express in writing the connection between tobacco and cancer.

Hedgerley has no stately home within its boundaries, and the only mansion (Hedgerley Park) was demolished in 1930. But it does have many old houses and farms of interest, some of which date back to the 16th century.
One house with a ghostly connection is Leith Grove, in Hedgerley Green, a hamlet next to the village of Hedgerley. It was built in 1580 to serve as gamekeeper's cottage on the old Hedgerley Park estate. It was here that Leslie French lived. When he and his friend, David Lloyd-Lowles, moved in (in 1931) they were told that in the late 18th, or early 19th century two men came to the house and killed the old lady who lived there in order to gain a body — body snatching being rife in those days. Some time in the 1940s a child was given the spare room, and in the morning she asked her mother who the nice lady was who had come to tuck her up. It was, in fact, the old lady who had been murdered. She appeared quite often to children, including those of families who had previously occupied the house. They thought her quite pleasant but were puzzled because she never spoke. When there was an adolescent there, the spirit became a poltergeist.

The work pattern of the village has changed considerably over the years. In the Roman period Hedgerley really established itself as an important centre for the production of pottery. In medieval times brickmaking was the main industry, and this reached its peak in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 18th century most of the residents were either in domestic service or tending the gardens and farms on the Bulstrode, Hedgerley Park and Hall Barn (Beaconsfield) estates. Others worked in the brick and tile works at various points along the valley.

The original village at the bottom of Hedgerley Hill has remained relatively unchanged, and has been declared a conservation area. But in the 1930s some private development was allowed at the top of the hill, and in the early 1950s a new council estate was built there, and this tended to change the pattern of village life. Most people travel outside the village to work — in London, at Heathrow Airport, in factories on the Slough Trading Estate, and in both National and Local Government.

But all in all present day Hedgerley is a very beautiful and friendly village in which to live.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Hedgerley Parish (Pop. 187)

No School in the parish

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Hitcham

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1484

Easting & Northing: 492183

Grid Ref SU920830 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Hitcham PARISH St Mary
Hutcham NAMES name for Hitcham in 1563
Hutcheham NAMES name for Hitcham in Domesday Book in 1086
Hycham NAMES name for Hitcham in 1526

 

Populations

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 200
1811 161
1821 172
1831 232
1841 267
1851 236
1861 205
1871 270
1881 395
1891 512
1901 553
1911 646
1921 657
1931 886
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Hitcham   St Mary   Baptisms   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Marriages   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1764   1812   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1753   1863   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1562   1750   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE MARTIN SAWYER COX
2 SALTER MEDWIN COX SAWYER
3 LANGTON AMAND NEWELL NEWELL
4 NICHOLAS GRETTON MOSDELL HOWARD
5 POOLE BOVINGTON WILLIAMS MOSDELL
6 STONE TAYLOR HOWARD WILLIAMS
7 FLOYD NASH WEBSTER POOLE
8 CLERKE MEDES SAWNEY WEBSTER
9 TAYLOR HATCH SLATER SMITH
10 SMITH SEDDING HORWOOD SAWNEY

 

Description

Description of  from Sheahan, 1861.

Hitcham lies on the banks of the Thames, and contains 1,370 acres and 205 persons. its rateable value £2,466. The village consists of a few scattered houses, and is distant 2.25 miles N.E. by E. from Maidenhead. The Great Western Railway passes through a portion of the parish.
In 1700 Dr. John Friend, the celebrated physician and writer, purchased the manor. After his decease it was sold to Lord Grenville, and it is now the property of Lady Grenville. The ancient seat of the lords of Hitcham stood N.E. of the church, but has long since been demolished.
The living is a rectory, rated at £11 5s. 7.5d. and worth about £400 a year. At the inclosure in 1778, almost 200 acres were allotted to the Rector in lieu of tithes. Eton College presents to the benefice, and the Rev. Henry Montague Grover is the Rector.
The Rectory House stands upwards of half a mile from the church, is a plain building, of brick, much improved and enlarged by the present Rector.

Notes

The hamlet of Hitcham lies between the villages of Taplow and Burnham. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book, at which time about thirteen families resided there. The ancient church of St Mary dates from about 1126 and in that century the first stone building was erected, of which the present nave walls appear to have formed a part.

The Lords of the Manor were often high-ranking officials of Church or State and the cottagers mainly would work for them, or for the tenant farmers. They lived near the manor house, which was north of the church. Lord Grenville — Prime Minister in 1806—07 — purchased the house in 1780 and the Lordship of the Manor in 1796. He acquired more land and built a new house called Dropmore Lodge. The old manor house became a school but was destroyed by fire in 1840.

Lord Grenville and his wife both died in the middle of the 19th century. Mr George Hanbury then bought lands around the church, including the old manor house site. He built Hitcham House, which still stands to the south of the church. He built a school (two rooms costing £350) and a reading room.

New roads, a new bridge over the Thames at Maidenhead and the coming of the Great Western Railway caused New Town to spring up in the south of Hitcham parish. There were a few shops and a pub, the Retreat. The general store, kept by Mr Wakefield, offered haircutting among the groceries! The shops have now changed or vanished. Some of them, being wooden, literally fell down. The public house moved into larger premises and still continues today, as the Maypole Inn. This area became the new centre of population.

In the north of the parish stands Nashdom Abbey. The name Nashdom is the Russian equivalent of 'Our House'. This property was built for Prince Alexis Dolgorouki in 1907-8 who engaged Sir Edwin Lutyens as the architect. The prince and princess did not live long in their impressive new house. They were both dead by 1919 and are buried in the churchyard of St Mary's church. This grave has a monument which incorporates a Russian icon. After 1919 the house was leased for a time to various tenants and in 1924 became the property of a community of Anglican Benedictine monks. It is the only Abbey of Benedictine monks in the Church of England.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Hitcham Parish (Pop. 232)

The children attend a National School in the adjoining parish of Burnham.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Horton

Introduction

Church: St Michael

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1367

Easting & Northing: 501175

Grid Ref TQ010750 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Horton PARISH St Michael
Hortune NAMES name for Horton in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1864
Colnbrook (Part) PLACE town in parish until 1853
Okehyde (lost) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 647
1811 723
1821 796
1831 804
1841 873
1851 842
1861 810
1871 835
1881 861
1891 824
1901 834
1911 871
1921 828
1931 1156
1941 N/A
1951 1033
1961 1024
1971 825
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Horton   St Michael   Baptisms   1571   1878   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Horton   St Michael   Marriages   1571   1849   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Horton   St Michael   Burials   1571   1876   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SANDON STEVENS STEVENS STEVENS
2 GURNEY ALLMAN CLARK BROWN
3 BOWRY SMITH BROWN CLARK
4 STEVENS SINGER COOK ALLMAN
5 HAYNES BROWN PULLIN WARDEN
6 HEARNE WARDEN BARNES COOK
7 HAINES HAYNES WARDEN SMITH
8 WEST BOWRY MILES HAYNES
9 WELLS HOLDERNESS BRADFORD HOLDERNESS
10 COOKE GREEN BENNETT PULLIN

 

Description

Description of Horton from J.J. Shearhan, 1861

Area, 1,610 acres; population, 810; rateable value, £4,168. A portion of the town of Colnbrook is in Horton parish. The place has acquired somewhat of a classical character, from having been the scene of a few years of Milton's life - from the 24th to the 30th year of his age - it being then the residence of his parents. The village is scattered and lies 1.25 mile S, from Colnbrook, and 4 miles E. from Windsor. Masson, in his "Life of Milton." gives pretty description of the village and neighbourhood. The place is remarkable for the nightingale, and hence Milton's "Sonnet" to that sweet bird.

Education

Horton Parish, with part of Colnbrook Chapelry, (Pop. 804)-

Three Daily Schools, containing 22 males and 18 females

One Day and Boarding School, 49 males, and 15 females all of whom are under instruction at the expense of their parents

Two Sunday Schools,

One (commenced 1820), supported by voluntary contributions, with 25 children of each sex;

The other (commenced 1821), supported by the Right Hon. T. Sulliven, with 10 males and 15 females. This School has a small lending Library attached.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Additional information