Bledlow

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 4169

Easting & Northing: 477202

Grid Ref SP770020 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Bledlow PARISH Holy Trinity
Shingles Fm NAMES name for Shimmell's Farm in 1826
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Church End. First Mentioned: 1820
Bledlow Cross PLACE within the parish
Callow Down PLACE within the parish
Common Leys PLACE within the parish
Drewells (lost) PLACE within the parish
Forty Green PLACE within the parish
Olive Green PLACE within the parish
Pitch Green PLACE within the parish
Shimmels PLACE within the parish
The Ford PLACE within the parish
The Lyde PLACE within the parish
Winnall PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 917
1811 931
1821 1050
1831 1135
1841 1205
1851 1202
1861 1189
1871 1170
1881 1070
1891 978
1901 854
1911 954
1921 879
1931 925
1941 N/A
1951 1679
1961 1871
1971 1984
1981 2134
1991 2000

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1592   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Burials   1591   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS STEVENS SMITH STEVENS
2 SMITH EUSTACE BROOKS SMITH
3 SALE SALE STEVENS BROOKS
4 COSTARD TRIPP BRITNELL SALE
5 RAUNCE PRATT AVERY BRITNELL
6 TOWNE HOLT KEEN PRATT
7 BIGGE SMITH ALLEN GOMME
8 STEEVENS TURNER FOLLEY AVERY
9 CLARKE HARRIS WHITE EUSTACE
10 RANCE GOMME GOMME KEEN

Description

Bledlow is a conservation village and thus retains much of its original pattern. It now includes the hamlets of Skittle Green, Forty Green, Holly Green and Pitch Green all of which lie north of the busy B4009, the Lower Icknield Way.
Though the origins of the village can be traced to the 10th century, there is clear evidence of earlier occupation. Close to the Upper Icknield Way is a Bronze Age barrow known locally as 'The Cop' which was excavated in 1938. One mile south of the village is Bledlow Cross, carved out of the Chiltern Ridge by the Anglo-Saxons and, with its neighbour Whiteleaf Cross, are the only turf-cut crosses in the country.

After the Norman Conquest, William I granted the Manor of Bledlow to his half-brother Robert, who held it in 1086. In the reign of Henry VI it was granted to Eton College but in 1650 James Blanck became owner and he built the original Manor House. Records show that the present Manor was sold in 1801 to Lord Carrington whose successor holds it at the present day.
The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane was built in 1869. In 1913 a schoolroom was added on reclaimed marshland where older residents of Bledlow can recall skating on frozen water. The Chapel provides the village with its Sunday School attended by many young children in the schoolroom.
The main Village School was built in 1868 and celebrated its centenary before closure in 1973 and subsequent demolition in 1984. Miss E. M. Folley had almost 52 years association with the school as both pupil and teacher. Present primary children must travel some 2 miles to Longwick. Five new flint and brick houses now stand on the site of the old school.

Bledlow has many listed buildings. The 16th century timber framed houses built near the church show the decorative Elizabethan brick herringboning but 'The Cottage' in West Lane is reputed to be the oldest house in the village of ancient cruck construction. It was once 2 cottages, the older of which is some 600 years old.

Now, although the old names of Heybourn, Gomme and Tappin are still here, most residents are commuters either to London, High Wycombe or Aylesbury. Like many villages it has become a haven, of rural living rather than a bustling village where people once were born, lived, worked and died; where the village was a self-sufficient entity within its own community.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Memories

Bledlow Station was opened at the beginning of 1864. The first Station Master was Mr John Greenaway; his son kept the Seven Stars public house opposite and had seven children. The pub was quite small, so every night beds were set up in the station waiting room for some of the children and removed before the first passenger train arrived in the morning.
In those days at Bledlow there were thirty-two trains a day, the station being manned by the master and two porters. Goods sent from the station were varied and in large quantities, ranging from two tons of Aylesbury ducks a week during the season to trawler blocks from James Walker's timber mills at Longwick which amounted to some two hundred tons a week, and milk from farmers in Bledlow and Henton. Many trucks of wood were unloaded at Bledlow and paper in large quantities sent in and out from the paper mills. In those days, rags were chopped at nearby North Mill in preparation for paper making at the Paper Mills. Then on a very sad day in January 1963, the station was closed after a busy and useful life of ninety-nine years. The line is still used to supply Thame Petrol Depot, B.P. and Shell.

J. Walker, Bledlow

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Description of Bledlow from Kelly's Directory 1883

Bledlow is a parish within the parliamentary borough of Aylesbury, in the hundred of Aylesbury, union of Wycombe, county court district of High Wycombe.

The area of the parish is 4,130 acres and have a rateable value of £4,414; the population in 1881, including Bledlow Ridge, Pitch Green, and Rout's Green was 1,070. Lord Carrington and Eton College are lords of the manor. The principle landowners are Lord Carrington, Eton College, Mrs Heybourn, Thomas Taylor, James Britnell, William Clarke, Henry Gibbons and Edward Crough Esqrs.

Education

Bledlow with Bledlow-ridge Parish (Pop. 1,135)

One Boarding School, in which about 4 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

Three Sunday Schools, consisting of 64 males and 76 females, chiefly supported by the Vicar and his friends; there are also Eight Lace Schools, containing about 75 children, many of whom are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


1900 Bourne End Telephone Directory

old telephoneThere were 42 entries in the 1900 telephone directory for Bourne End. Although Bourne End was just a part of Wooburn Parish (the parish is now called "Wooburn and Bourne End") it did have its own Telephone Exchange.

Register to read more...

Bledlow Ridge

Bledlow Ridge is a long stretch of roadway that winds up a steep ascent from West Wycombe over the Chiltern Hills towards Oxfordshire. It is part of the ancient parish of Bledlow and gets a mention in the Domesday Book. The name means 'Bloody Hill' and commemorates a fierce battle between the Danes and the Saxons. It goes further back into history than that. Impressions exist of hut circles and the occasional fragments of pottery and implements, which together with the nearness of the Icknield Way, indicate a Romano-British settlement of around 300 BC. From time to time, iron cannon balls, silver shoe buckles and coin of the early Stuart kings are unearthed, evidence of a battle between the Royalists and the Roundheads in the Civil War and the famous victory for the Royalists at Chinnor in 1643.

Read more: Bledlow Ridge

Memories of Bledlow Ridge

At Bledlow Ridge forty years ago the dwellings were few and far between, often tucked away down a side lane, and the population was little more than four hundred. Cattle and sheep grazed serenely and safely on neat grass verges.
It was a marvellously tidy place, conservation being practised more than it was preached in those days. Although there was no organised refuse collection, no unsightly rubbish littered the countryside and leaving paper litter was a punishable offence for the reason that it might blow about and frighten horses and bring some poor creature to an untimely end. All waste material usually found its way back to the land. No milk bottle problem existed either for, armed with a milk jug, one went to the nearest farm and queued at the dairy door after the morning or evening milking.

Read more: Memories of Bledlow Ridge

Education Provision 1833

Bledlow with Bledlow Ridge Parish (Pop. 1,135)

One Boarding School, in which about 4 females are educated at the expense of their parents.
 
Three Sunday Schools, consisting of 64 males and 76 females, chiefly supported by the Vicar and his friends; there are also Eight Lace Schools, containing about 75 children, many of whom are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Notes on Bledlow Ridge

Description from Sheahan, 1861. With other notes.

Register to read more...

Memories of Bradenham

I was born, as was my mother before me, at the Bradenham Bradenham Red Lion. My grandmother died when my mother was eighteen years old so she and my grandfather ran the pub until he died and then my father took it over.
Bradenham is now a National Trust Village but before that it was preserved as an old Manor holding by the Graves family.

Read more: Memories of Bradenham

Additional information