Frieth

Introduction

Church: St John the Evangelist

Hundred: Desborough

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 479190

Grid Ref SU790900 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Frieth PARISH St John the Evangelist

Notes

There are only some two hundred houses in our small village. These surround a square of lanes with Frieth Hill forming one side.
The name Frieth is said to have come from a word meaning forest; an aerial view of the village still shows this to be true, for Frieth appears as a patch of open fields and houses cut out from the surrounding woods.

One could say that Frieth is a comparatively new village, as its little Victorian church was built in 1848. The church stands at the top of the hill beside the village green and its best architectural features are its wood carving and stained glass. Most of the woodwork was done by the firm of West and Collier whose factory was in the village and who employed and housed many of the villagers. The firm specialised in making chairs and carved woodwork for churches and cathedrals and its products were sent all over the world. Sadly, the firm closed during the Second World War.

Most of the beautiful stained glass windows in Frieth Church are by Kempe and were the gift of the Cripps family who lived at Parmoor House until 1948. Probably the most well-known member of Lord Parmoor's family was his youngest son, Sir Stafford Cripps, a famous Chancellor of the Exchequer. Lord Parmoor was referred to as The Squire, and the village owes much to his philanthropy. He owned most of the farms in the northern half of Hambleden parish. But that is all in the past. Now the farmland around Frieth is divided into four large units and no farm labourers live in the village itself. Parmoor House is St Katharine's Convent, and a community of Anglican nuns run it as a home for the elderly.

Ours is not a tourist village like Hambleden, Fingest or Turville, nor will you find Frieth in the many publications about the Chilterns, but we have an undefinable something that welds us into a community. Perhaps we have been fortunate that new buildings have come gradually; one can find an example of most building periods here. Frieth has been spared the large housing estates which could have been difficult to assimilate. Also, the majority of people who have moved into the village have done so because they saw a quality in village life they had failed to find elsewhere. The remark often made, and one we like to hear, is that Frieth is a caring friendly village. Half a century ago no Frieth man would have met another without the friendly greeting, 'Ow be on'. Yes, we still say, 'Good-morning' to one another!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Description

A hamlet in Hambleden. The church St John the Evangelist was built in 1848 as a chapel of ease.

At Freith, a hamlet nearly 3 miles N.E. from Hambleden, is a chapel of Ease erected by subscription in 1848. It is a neat little Gothic Edifice, with a bell cote between the nave and chancel. The seats are of cedar. (Sheahan, 1861)

 

Great Hampden

Introduction

Church: St Mary Magdalen

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 1763

Easting & Northing: 484201

Grid Ref SP840010 Click to see map

There are no articles linked to this parish.
 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Hampden PARISH St Mary Magdalen
Hamdenenam NAMES name for Hampden in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Bryant's Bottom. First Mentioned: 1863
Aldridge Grove PLACE within the parish
Bryants Bottom (Part) PLACE within the parish
Honor End (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 228
1811 235
1821 281
1831 286
1841 290
1851 308
1861 266
1871 262
1881 255
1891 246
1901 207
1911 424
1921 440
1931 408
1941 N/A
1951 334
1961 331
1971 315
1981 247
1991 277

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Hampden   St Mary Magdalen   Baptisms   1557   1812   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Hampden   St Mary Magdalen   Marriages   1559   1835   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Hampden   St Mary Magdalen   Marriages   1838   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Hampden   St Mary Magdalen   Burials   1557   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HAMPDEN WALKER MARTIN MARTIN
2 PAGE TYLER BIGNELL WALKER
3 LITTLEPAGE MARTIN REDRUP TYLER
4 TYLER STONE ATKINS PAGE
5 EAST MASON LEWIS HAMPDEN
6 MILLER REDRUP WARD REDRUP
7 HORE PAGE FREE MASON
8 BOURD LANCASTER COCK STONE
9 WALKER BRYANT WALKER LANCASTER
10 RANDALL MARTEN CHILTON EAST

 

Notes

Great Hampden is one of those places where it is said nothing ever happens but once upon a time it did.

Most villages have their Big House, and Great Hampden is no exception. The large dwelling that stands on top of the hill overlooking the valley between the two Hampdens, was once the home of John Hampden, cousin of Oliver Cromwell. A man of great integrity, it was he who, took a stand against his king in opposition to the crippling 'Ship Tax', which ultimately triggered the Civil War in England. He died at Thame after being wounded at the Battle of Chalgrove Field. He was brought home to be buried at Great Hampden. His memorial cross stands, like a sentinel, on the road from Prestwood.

The last Earl of Buckinghamshire to live in his ancestral home was, like his ancestor, a much respected man. Affectionately known as 'The Squire', he knew most of the villagers by name. In 1950, it was he who organised the laying of the cricket field, and when he died, his memorial was an extension to the village hall, incorporating committee room, entrance, and pavilion. The much envied, immaculately maintained field, where for generations sons have followed fathers in the team, still provides a venue for them and their families.

A staunch supporter of the cricket team for many years was the Rev. P. Hill. The love of the game was one of his reasons for taking the living, and when he died in 1985 a great sense of loss was felt by the community. Hampden House, once the ancestral home of the Earls of Buckinghamshire, was taken over as a girls school at the outbreak of the Second World War, and it subsequently took on the role of a film studio, the perfect setting for historical dramas, and macabre films.

When a project to re-discover a village pond was taken up, an enthusiastic band of W.I. members and their families hacked away small trees, shrubs and undergrowth and cleared the site of Blakemore Pond. Water is back, plants are growing, frogs abound, and ducks have been seen. The work of maintaining this small oasis will, it is hoped, continue.

The Chiltern woodland integrating the 50 homes that comprise the village of Great Hampden has, over the years, provided timber for the local furniture industry. At one time the 'bodgers' (chair-leg makers, who worked in the woods) worked there and the last man to ply his trade was a local man, Mr Dean.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Great Hampden from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Great Hampden, or Hampden Magna, contains 1,720 acres and 266 inhabitants. It is situated amongst extensive beech woods, on the high table of the Chiltern Hills. There is neither a river or brook in the parish, and the supply of water is at all times meagre. The springs that exist are very deep and pure. The houses in general are supplied with tanks for holding rain water, and the cattle are watered at ponds. The soil; but here are also very fine limes, balm of gilead firs, and cedars of uncommon size and great beauty. There are no assemblage of houses which could properly be denominated a village. Nearly all the farmsteads and cottages lie scattered on the side of a large common, and are known as Hampden Row. This place is distant from Wendover 5 miles E.S.E., and from Great Missenden 3 miles W.N.W. The females are partly engaged in lace making.

 

Education

Great Hampden Parish (Pop. 286)

One small Daily School, in which 3 males and 3 females are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday School, attended by 12 males and 18 females daily, and 25 males and 31 females on Sundays; supported by the Earl of Buckingham, who allows a weekly salary of twelve shillings to the mistress, small payments being also made by the children, which are appropriated in purchasing requisites for the furnishing of the School.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Great Kimble

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 2507

Easting & Northing: 482205

Grid Ref SP820050 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Kimble PARISH St Nicholas
Bulpittwood NAMES name for Pulpit wood in 1639
Chenebelle NAMES name for Kimble in Domesday Book in 1086
Chenebelle, Parva NAMES name for Kimble in Domesday Book in 1086
Kymball NAMES name for Kiimble in 1510
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Union Chapel, Church Street. First Mentioned: 1875
Grange (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Kimble Wick (Part) PLACE within the parish
Longdown PLACE within the parish
Marsh (Part) PLACE within the parish
Pulpit Wood PLACE within the parish
Sollinger PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 316
1811 319
1821 360
1831 436
1841 489
1851 501
1861 408
1871 459
1881 422
1891 395
1901 345
1911 478
1921 541
1931 662
1941 N/A
1951 765
1961 807
1971 917
1981 883
1991 873

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Kimble   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1756   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Great Kimble   St Nicholas   Marriages   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Great Kimble   St Nicholas   Burials   1575   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GOODCHILD BLACKWELL GILBERT GILBERT
2 STATHAM FORD RUTLAND TAPPING
3 CLARKE WEST TAPPING RUTLAND
4 SMITH GURNEY WYATT WYATT
5 KING CLARK EAST EAST
6 WARDEN TAPPING ORCHARD READING
7 REYNOLDS ALLEN LEACH HERITAGE
8 GYLES HUMPHREY READING BLACKWELL
9 BARRETT GATES HERITAGE CLARK
10 HERBERT BATES BRAY ORCHARD

 

Note

Cymbeline's Mount, high in the hills in Chequer's land, was the stronghold of the British King Cunabelin or Cymbeline, from whom Great and Little Kimble derive their names. A gold coin depicting him was found here. Relics indicate that there was a Romano British village, a Roman villa and a Neolithic hill camp in Kimble hills.

The Kimbles consist of three churches, two schools, three pubs, a railway station, a garage, a cricket club and a much used village hall.
St Nicholas's church, Great Kimble, was famed for the stand John Hampden took against paying Ship Tax money in 1637. Legend has it that he galloped up the hill and into the church to make his protest to his assembled tenants and neighbours.

All Saints, Little Kimble, has stood for 700 years on Britain's oldest highway, the Icknield Way. An unspoilt medieval church, its greatest treasure is a series of 14th century wall paintings, recently restored and considered by an expert, Mr Clive Rouse, as 'artistically the best in Bucks'.
As early as 1636 there was Baptist witness in Kimble with people meeting in their homes. The present church was built in 1933 and is well loved and attended.

On Remembrance Sunday Scottish pipers, traditionally dressed, pipe the procession from St Nicholas to the War Memorial at Little Kimble for the service for the dead of two world wars, and then return to The Bernard Arms for refreshment.

The Crown mainly serves the villagers of Little Kimble. Annually a Harvest Festival has been held there. After the thanksgiving service, accompanied by Ellesborough Silver Band, produce donated is auctioned, the proceeds going to charity. Morris dancers also entertain there.

The Swan and Brewer is a free house. The open space in front is used for many things — for bonfire night, for the Beagles to meet, and also for the Vale of Aylesbury Hunt to foregather. Sometimes as many as 100 horses and ponies meet.
Kimble Cricket Club was formed in 1907 some three years after a Ladies C.C. was started. Most players live locally. It has literally been a family club to the Adams, the Spitalls and the Woolcott families. Frank Woolcott was outstanding with over 32,000 runs and 200 wickets to his credit.

The Kimble Point to Point Races are well known. The Queen is patron and the Queen Mother has attended. At the Easter meeting the Trumpeters of the King's Troop lead the field to the start. This event is held on Mr C. M. Robarts' land.
The Berkeley Hunt was changed to The Vale of Aylesbury Hunt several years ago. The livery colour is old tawny, that of the Earl of Berkeley. They meet at The Swan and Brewer as do the Old Berkeley Beagles.

The inhabitants of Kimble include farmers and farm workers, engine drivers, Lloyds underwriters, caretakers, gardeners, architects, estate agents, motor mechanics, shop keepers and many retired people, among them nurses, postmen and journalists who all participate in village life.

To conclude, Kimble dwellers range from Baroness Berkeley who sat in the House of Lords for 18 years yet joined in village activities, to Freddie Foster who scythed the grass verges for innumerable ages and was known and liked by all.
A friendly couple of villages!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Great Kimble from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Great Kimble contains 2,473 acres (including the hamlets of Kimble of Wick and Marsh), and 408 inhabitants. It is of oblong form; the soil, in its northern part, is a deep clay, and on the southern, or Chiltern side, is intermixed with flints and chalk.

The village is small, and lies about 3.5 miles W.S.W. from Wendover.

The manor house is a farm residence, erected on the site of an old moated mansion, which stood west of the church. It was erected about 60 years ago. The ancient moat may still be traced. Near the house is an old building, now used as a barn, which has a handsome roof, to which particles of colouring still adhere. It is probable that this was the chapel of the old house. In a field at the rear of the Manor House are some remains of ancient entrenchments. There is also a large fishpond in the vicinity.

Education

 Great Kimble Parish (Pop. 436)

Two Day and Sunday National Schools; one is attended by 20 females daily, and 50 on Sundays ; the other (lately commenced), by 20 males daily, and 25 on Sundays; these Schools are supported by subscription, aided by weekly payments from the children.

There is also a School, in which about 20 children are taught lace-making.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Great Marlow

Introduction

Church: All Saints with Holy Trinity

Hundred: Desborough

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 6245

Easting & Northing: 484186

Grid Ref SU840860 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Great Marlow PARISH All Saints with Holy Trinity
Ackhumstead NAMES name for Ackhampstead in 1825
Balmers NAMES name for Barmoor in 1826
Bermers NAMES name for Barmoor in 1766
Bormers NAMES name for Barmoor in 1797
Bubington NAMES name for Bovingdon in 1766
Fenny More NAMES name for Finnamore in 1766
Wydmer NAMES name for Widmere in 1535
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Ebernezer Chapel, Glade Road. First Mentioned: 1856
Independent/URC NON-CONFORMIST Salem Chapel/Christ Church . First Mentioned: 1692. Rebuilt 1840, 1863, 1890
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Spittal Street. First Mentioned: 1810. Rebuilt 1900
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Chapel Street. First Mentioned: 1831
Ackhampstead (lost) PLACE within the parish, see Cadmore End PRs for 1786 - 1837
Barmoor (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Beechwood PLACE within the parish
Bovingdons Green PLACE within the parish
Burrows Grove (Part) PLACE within the parish
Dirty Bottom PLACE within the parish
Ditchfield (Part) PLACE within the parish
Finnamore (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Forty Green PLACE within the parish
Handy Cross PLACE within the parish
Harleyford PLACE within the parish
Juniper Hill PLACE within the parish
Lane End (Part) PLACE within the parish
Marefield PLACE within the parish
Marlow Bottom PLACE within the parish
Marlow Common PLACE within the parish
Monkton PLACE within the parish
Moor Common (Part) PLACE within the parish
Mortons (lost) PLACE within the parish
Munday Dean PLACE within the parish
Rassler Wood PLACE within the parish
Spinfield PLACE within the parish
Widmere PLACE within the parish
Wymers Hill Green PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 3236
1811 3965
1821 3763
1831 4237
1841 4480
1851 4485
1861 4661
1871 4701
1881 4763
1891 5250
1901 5645
1911 5876
1921 6391
1931 6751
1941 N/A
1951 7883
1961 10686
1971 11749
1981 14413
1991 13222

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Great Marlow   Salem Chapel   Baptisms   1774   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   All Saints with Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1592   1716   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   All Saints with Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1758   1783   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   All Saints with Holy Trinity   Marriages   1592   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   Salem Chapel   Burials   1777   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   All Saints with Holy Trinity   Burials   1813   1851   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Great Marlow   All Saints with Holy Trinity   Burials   1592   1610   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WEBB WEBB SMITH SMITH
2 CARTER WHITE WHITE WHITE
3 LANGLEY OXLADE HARRIS CARTER
4 GRAY HARMAN EAST HARRIS
5 LOVEJOY SMITH PRICE EAST
6 JAMES STEVENS DAVIS WEBB
7 HILL LANGLEY CARTER CLARK
8 BROWNE CARTER CLARK DAVIS
9 RAVENINGE HARRIS COLLINS COLLINS
10 HOBBS EAST BOWLES PRICE

 

Notes

In the late 1920s it would have taken someone with a flair for predicting the future to guess that Marlow Bottom, which was then little more than rough fields with a muddy track running down the centre, would 40 years later provide homes for nearly 5,000 people. It was in the mid-1940s that the move towards development started. Families from the poorer parts of London who were experiencing nightly bombing found that they could escape for short weekends just for the down payment of £20 for a 40 ft frontage on the unmade-up road. These settlers, all do-it-yourself fans, had fiercely held views on what their new homes should look like. At weekends the valley hummed with activity, and at that time there were no disapproving planning officers looking over their shoulders to curb their eccentricities.

The first amenity for the new dwellers was milk delivered down the valley in a trap carrying the milk churns. Today what started so simply has become recognised as a highly desirable residential area, with developers hovering to pounce on the smallest plot of vacant land. However, traces of its country past can be found in the naming of 'Badger's Way', 'Oliver's Paddock' — Oliver being a much respected donkey - and 'Patches Field' where Patch the pony surrendered his rights to a much admired sheltered housing development. Also it is still possible to find some of the original downland flowers, including the Pyramid orchid and the Chiltern gentian.
A long established feature has been the Village Hall. This started inauspiciously as the 'Witches' Barn', a cafe that did not prosper. It had as neighbour a Nissen hut which was used as a canteen by Land Army Girls. This later became the Barn Club. Both these buildings have been modernised and are run by the Village Hall Trust. The most important annual event in Marlow Bottom has been the Rose Carnival and it was through the organisers that money was raised and targeted to buy and help maintain the playing fields. These are ideally situated and much used by local children.

The first President of the Village Hall was a Mr Folker, a flamboyant character who strode the valley in a large black sombrero and a black cloak. He had the good fortune to add to his life style by living in Dingley-Dell. A partner to his eccentricity was a slightly demented lady who was to be seen walking in the valley at nightfall, wringing her hands, clothed only in her nightgown.

More recently Marlow Bottom has been able to celebrate having its own local hero. Stephen Redgrave brought back a Gold Medal from the Los Angeles Olympics, 1984 a record 3 Gold Medals at the Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh in 1986 and a gold medal from the 1986 World Championships for rowing. It seemed quite right that he should ride down the Bottom on the top of a double decker bus to universal applause. Another local resident, Margaret Beer, is well known for her hobby of restoring injured birds and animals to health.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

I come of a bell-ringing family. My grandfather, who was manager of the rope wharf opposite the 'Compleat Angler' (where now Turk's Boat Yard is) pealed
the bells for forty-five years. In those days the ringers used to spin their own 'string' for the bells and would go to the rope wharf to do it, where there was space for the ropes to be laid out. Grandfather was also elected verger of the church in spite of his refusal to bow and scrape to any odd Lord or Lady who chose to walk through the churchyard.


We went to the Parish Church four times on Sundays. After the last service, we walked round Westhorpe Park, now lost under the motorway, and had our weekly treat of ginger pop. In 1897 the spire of the church was struck by lightning and the steeplejacks were called in to repair it. A little unwisely, they left the ladder up and in the evening my cousin, Mary Truss, clambered to the top. The vicar was furious, the Truss's landlord (they kept the Two Brewers inn) threatened to evict them: but it all ended happily with the steeplejacks presenting the daring Mary with a gold watch.

Once a friend and I walked along the river to Bisham side and to Sandy Bay. At the second bridge, General Sir George Higgison was passing underneath in his boat and called out, asking where we had been. When we said 'to church', he gave us twopence each. I kept that twopence for years but finally succumbed to the tempations of a local sweets' shop. The General lived to be a hundred years old and gave Marlow the land now known as Higgison Park.

The big event of the year was Marlow Regatta. The original Maidenhead and Marlow Rowing Club was formed in 1871 with a subscription of half a guinea per annum and donors of ten guineas were made life members. For two guineas you could become a vice-president. Eleven years after that Marlow ran its own regatta and gradually it became the largest open competition of its kind in the world.

Another big day was Rag Regatta when they hung tyres from Marlow Bridge and the contestants in punts had to climb through them. They also played water football and the entire river bank was open to watchers and no enclosures allowed in my young days.

May Harvey, Sands

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

 

Description

Description of Great Marlow from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Great Marlow is a parliamentary borough, and an ancient market town, situated on the banks of the Thames, 5.25 S.W from High Wycombe, 5 N.W from Maidenhead, 4 W from the Marlow Road Railway Station, and 31 miles W. by N from London. The parish comprises 6,152 acres (including 674 acres of wood-land), and the population at present (1861) numbers 4,659 souls, viz, 2,248 males, and 2,411 females. The rateable value of the town and parish is £12,551. The parish being so extensive, the soil is very variable. The commons were inclosed in 1850.

The Parliamentary Borough of Great Marlow consists of the parishes of Great and Little Marlow and Medmenham, in Buckinghamshire; and the parish of Bisham on the south side of the Thames , county of Berkshire. It was wholly situated within the parish of Great Marlow until 1832. The borough sent two members to Parliament so early as the year 1299, but for a long period the privilege was disused. The present representatives are Colonel Thomas Peers Williams, of Temple House, Bisham; and Lieut.-Colonel Brownlow Knox of Wilton Cresent, London.

The town consists of one principle street (High Street), with minor streets branching from it nearly at right angles. All the streets are well paved, and lighted with gas, and the houses and shops generally present a neat and respectable appearance. The High Street is spacious, with a gradual descent and nearly a quarter of a mile in length; at the top of it are the Town Hall and Crown Hotel. The town is well sheltered on the northern side, and on the south it is connected with Berkshire by a handsome suspension bridge.

The surrounding scenery is remarkably picturesque and beautiful; and the Thames between here and Maidenhead is considered to be the finest portion of the river. The air is mild and temperate, and the place is remarkably healthy. Marlow is a favourite resort of anglers.
There are three breweries here - one of which belongs to Messrs. O. and L. W. Wethered, and is worked by steam. The operations of Mr. James Meeks's brewery are also carried on by the aid of steam power. There are extensive paper-mills on the banks of the Thames, and the other trades of importance are in corn, coal, and timber. Lace embroidery, and satin-stitch work was formerly carried on here to a considerable extent.

The town hall is a substantial edifice, erected in 1807, at the cost of the late T. Williams, Esq., M.P. for the borough. The ground floor, formerly used for the purposes of the market, has three arces in front, and from the roof rises a turret in which are two bells and a clock. The hall, which is handsome, spacious, and lofty, is used for assemblies, lectures, etc. The Lecture Hall, in St. Peter's Street, is a spacious building in the Gothic style, just erected (1861). The room is lofty, and open to the stained timber roof. The County Magistrates hold Petty Sessions every alternate Saturday, at the Crown Hotel; and a Savings' Bank is held at the National School-room. The town was first lighted with gas in November, 1848. The gas-works belong to a company of shareholders.

Description

Marlow is a pleasant town on the banks of the river Thames, over which a new bridge has been lately erected by subscription of the nobility and. gentry in the neighbourhood: the inhabitants have likewise paved the foot-paths of the town by voluntary subscriptions. The chief manufacture of the place is black silk lace, and paper.

Marlow is distant from Wycomb five miles, Beaconsfield seven, Maidenhead five, Henley seven, and London thirty-two.

This town lies under the Chiltern-hills, in a marly soil; it is a pretty large borough, though not incorporated, and has a handsome church and town-hall, with a charity-school for twenty boys, who are taught and clothed.-The borough of Marlow being the joint property of William Clayton, Esq. and W. Lee Antonie, Esq. is one of those many which can boast of no privilege except that of voting at the will of a superior. It may be proper here to observe, that William Clayton, Esq. resigned his seat, at the last election, to Thomas Williams, Esq. a partner in the Anglesea copper-mines. The majority of the houses and property joining the borough belonging to the above gentlemen, no opposition to them can ever be attempted with success.

This borough sent fourteen times to parliament before the 3d Edw. II and then ceased sending for four hundred years, until it was restored at James I when it began again to send member's. The right of election was resolved, Dec 21, 1680, and Nov. 21, 1690, to be in those inhabitants only who pay scot and lot. (A local tax usually paid by members of the merchant guilds) The returning officers are the constables. Number of voters, 216.


The Thames brings goods hither from the neighbouring towns, especially great quantities of meal and malt from High Wycomb, and beech from several parts of the county, which abounds with this wood more than any in England. In the neighbourhood are frequent horse-races ; and here are several corn and paper mills, particularly on the river Loddon, between this town and High Wycomb. It has two fairs, one on the 29th of October and two following days, for horses, cattle, hops, cloathing, and toys ; also a statute for hiring servants: and the other on the ist and 2nd of May for cattle and toys. Market-day is Saturday. There are two good inns in the town, one, the Upper Crown, the port and excise office, the other the Lower Crown.


A bye-post comes here every day (except Mondays) from Wycomb 5 postage four-pence. The letters are delivered out at nine o'clock in the morning, and are sent off at seven in the evening.


A stage-coach sets out from the Upper Crown at five o'clock in the morning, and returns the same day: fare 7s.-Another coach goes from the Lower Crown three times a-week : fare 7 s. There are two stage-waggons set off on Monday morning, and return on Wednesday

Marlow is surrounded with a number of villages and gentlemens seats, the chief of which is, Temple Mills, a village with a large manufactory of copper, brass, and brass-wire; here is the seat of Thomas Williams, Esq. member for Marlow. Near this are two mills, which are both of an extraordinary kind; one for making of thimbles, the other for pressing of oil from rape and flax seed; both which turn to very good account to the proprietors.


Bisham, (Berks,) a small village, with a large mansion the seat of George Vansittart, Esq. member for Berks. This village is pleasantly situated on the Thames, almost opposite to Great Marlow. Its church, though small, is well worth seeing. On the river not far from hence are those called the temple, or brass-mills, for making brass kettles, pans, &c. of all sorts, which were attended with great success till 1710, when, it being made a bubble, it underwent the fate of all its cotemporary bubbles. At Bisham was formerly an abbey, and the remains of it are still to be seen. The estate belonged once to the Knights Templar, and since came to the ancient family of Hobby, whereof Sir William Hobby, and Sir Edward Hobby, are noted in our histories; the latter as having been employed by Queen Elizabeth in the most important foreign negotiations, as a learned man, and great antiquarian. Their monuments, with those of their ladies and children, are in the little church of Bisham, and well worth seeing. The seat of the family is now in Dorsetshire; but hither they are generally all brought, when they die, to be buried with their ancestors.

Hurley, (Berks,) a pleasant village on the Oxford road, about two miles and a half distant, with several gentlemen's seats.-Hedfor, east of Marlow, near Cliefdon, is in a delightful situation, and possesses beauties sufficient to attract the visits of strangers, especially the gardens and park with the woods-adjoining, which are exceedingly picturesque and romantic.

Notes

Bovingdon Green has a gentle village atmosphere and most of the people who live on the Green find that there is a friendly way of life. This friendship is helped by the fact that in 1968 a group of residents decided to form the Bovingdon Green Preservation Society. This society not only keeps the grass cut and the green looking tidy, but also has social and fund raising activities, a picnic barbecue lunch in the summer and a supper usually twice a year in the Village Hall. Since the society was founded, it has become the custom to plant ornamental trees to the memory of residents who have died.

The Village Hall, built in 1926, is thriving at the present time, being used regularly by many groups in the evening and a successful play group meets every morning during term-time. Bovingdon Green W.I. have met there since it was built and Marlow Common also use the hall.

In 1983 the Lord of the Manor offered Bovingdon Green for sale. It was purchased by a local business man. Life goes on much the same except that the Green now has large notices warning people not to park cars or ride horses.
At one time there was a village school at Bovingdon Green. It vras founded by General Sir George Higginson in memory of his wife. This school closed in 1925 and the building was demolished.

For a long time the village supported two public houses. The Jolly Cricketers closed during the 1930s, but the Royal Oak Continues and is situated by the pond where mallards raise duckings every spring.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

I came to live in Bovingdon Green in 1906, when my Bovingdon father went to work as head gardener at a large house Green called The Orchards, where they kept a carriage and a pair of lovely black horses. I was five years old at the time.

I went to Bovingdon Green village school where there were about eighty children with three teachers. It sounds quite a large school for such a small village, but families were big in those days; there were six children in my family and thirteen in another! Children used to come from outlying farms and cottages, some of them walking three to four miles each way. After the first war, the school was closed and the building unfortunately knocked down. A private house called School House, which still exists, was built on the site. The iron railings that surrounded the original school remain round the house.

There were about fifteen cottages around the village green and two pubs. The first one, the Royal Oak, beside the village pond, is still there and has not changed very much. At the other side of the green was the Jolly Cricketers which had a pretty garden where people sat sipping their drinks in the summertime. Parties used to travel out from London for the day in horse-brakes, bringing their food with them for what they called a 'bean-feast', which they washed down with beer from the Jolly Cricketers. I can remember them throwing pennies to us children which we hastened to spend at a cottage on the green, where the wife sold sweets which she produced from jars kept under her bed. They were 4 oz for one penny!

The Jolly Cricketers was later closed and became the village shop with a little post-office. This has now also gone. When I was a child there was no shop in the village, so if we wanted to visit the shops we walked the two miles into Marlow. But there was no need for this really as the baker, grocer and butcher called every day; also paraffin was brought to the door.

On Empire Day, 24 May, we danced round the Maypole on Bovingdon Green dressed in our white frocks, with the boys in white blazers.

I left school at fourteen and went to work at The Orchards. There were three gardeners and four staff in the house. I started in the kitchen and after some time was housemaid, parlourmaid and finished up as cook. We had plenty of work to do but were quite happy.

Jerome K. Jerome, who wrote Three Men in a Boat, lived in a house on Marlow Common, which is just beyond Bovingdon Green. I can remember going to tea at his house with my brothers and sisters.

Elsie Frith, Bovingdon Green

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

 

Education

Great Marlow, Borough and Parish (Pop. 4,237)

Six Infant Schools, in which about 50 children are instructed at the expense of their parents

Six Daily Schools, two of which are endowed, one with £50 per annum, for which 24 males are educated, the other with £12 per annum, which is paid to a mistress who
instructs 12 females.

One National School, supported by voluntary contributions, containing 95 males and 55 females; two others contain 36 females; the other, 6 males and 6 females.   In the three last Schools the instruction of the children is paid for by their parents.

Four Boarding Schools, two for males and two for females, wherein 70 of the former sex and 50 of the latter are educated at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Great Marlow Churches

Introduction

Data provided by Julian Hunt, see Julian Hunt's Local History website.

He gathered the material in preparation for the book Marlow - A Pictorial History and has kindly allowed the Buckinghamshire Family History Society to reproduce it here

 

Anglican

ALL SAINTS CHURCH

1706 Visitation
Great Marlow (Marlow magna)
(a) Mr William Harvey, Vicar.
The Dean and Chapter of Gloucester, Patron.
(b) It is 3 miles in length 9 or 10 in compasse, and contains 300 families.
The dissenters are generally Presbyterians; some few Anabaptists, and one or two Quakers. There is one meeting house in this parish Besides these there are divers papists: John Brinkhurst, Esquire, of £500 per annum estate; Thomas, his brother; Thomas Crompton, Esquire, his uncle; John Abington, Esquire, has £100 a year within this parish, though he be of Worcestershire; wife and 5 children of Mr John Brinkhurst; six of their servants; and 3 others. The Vicarege is worth £80 per annum.
(c) Here is a lecture of £20 per annum. A schole endowed with £12 a year at present, but with an estate that will encrease in value. An almeshouse with £16 per annum endowment. Gentlemen living in this parish are: Sir James Etheredg, Knight, John Brinkhurst, Esquire, John Abingdon at a seat called Seymours, and (John)* Thomas Crompton, Esquire.
No monuments of note in the church nor antiquities in the parish.
Exhibit in Visitation AD 1706.

1709 Visitation
(a) Mr Richard Millechamp, Vicar.
Ordination Gilbert Hereford 7 June 1696.
Institution 5 August Induction 19 October 1708.
Mr Thomas Beesly, scholemaster.
Licensed William Foster Official 31 December 1696.
Families above 400: about 2,400 souls; of these one papist family, and some few Anabaptists, of no account. The meeting house disused for some time past.
(c) The schole was founded by one of the Borlaces. 20 blue-coat boys are taught in it.The almshouse was founded by one of the Bringkhursts. It has 4 tenements for 4 poor persons who have 20 shillings a peice a quarter. An estate of £25 a year left by William and Thomas Drew, to the use of the church, the writings of which are lost.
This is not well employed.
None come to church un-baptized; many not confirmed.
Communicants at least 1,000; of which 200 received at Easter last, many of age neglect this duty altogether.

1712 Visitation . ,
Families above 500: some occasionall conformists. They often meet in a barn; one Edward Pain, a youth, speaker.
The children not well instructed in the principles of religion.
The Vicar personally resides.
One adult, a Quaker, baptized since my last Visitation.
Divine service twice every Lord's Day.
The youth frequently catechized.
Communions 4 times a year; about 200 received at Easter last. Notice duly given.
No pennances nor commutations since my last Visitation.

1773 The building of the new pound lock raised the level of the river and the church was regularly flooded. The wooden framing of the pews was said to be stained by flood water up to 17ins above the floor level.

1831 Part of church collapsed. The decision was taken not to repair but rebuild the Church. The style chosen was perpendicular gothic, popular in the early 19th century, but the rectangular shape and the lack of chancel was more typical of the previous century. The structure was of yellow brick with stone dressings.

1835 Church completed. Inside the new church, a potentially light and airy preaching room was cluttered with box pews and further seating on galleries supported on iron columns. The arrangement did however provide seating for 1,200.

1851 Religious Census
Population 4485
All Saint Parish Church
Endowed: Tithe £80, Fees £40
Easter Offerings £15, Other Sources £60.
Free Sittings 32; Other Sittings 1,168, Total 1,200.
On the 30th March
Morning General Congregation 620, Sunday Scholars 450, Total 1,076;
Afternoon General Congregation 416, Sunday Scholars 410, Total 826,
Evening General Congregation 460 Total 460.
Dated Twenty fourth April.
Signed Frederick Bussell Vicar of the parish, Marlow. 1. Frederick Bussell V.

1855 Advowson granted to Bishop of Oxford

1863 The Swan Inn which stood on the Causeway near to the church was demolished to make way for a new vicarage.

1875 Chancel added.

1882 The interior of the church was transformed by the removal of the galleries in 1882

1889 Installation of arcading supporting a more steeply pitched roof.

1898 New spire

Vicarage

THE VICARAGE

1607 D/A/Gt/6/17/1
The vicarage house is situate and lying in the High Street of Marlow abovesaid on the west side of the same street between the tenement and land of Thomas Farmer of Cookham in the County of Berks Esq on the south wherein now dwelleth one Richard Pasmore baker and the tenement and land of one Cotterill of Eastamsted in the County of Berks yeoman on the north side and wherin now dwelleth one William Switser jersey dresser
The said vicarage house is of building two storeys high covered with tile consisting of these rooms following
A hall paved
A kitchen and two other low rooms
A shop and a cellar underneath
And six chambers boarded
A square court between the houses with a well in it
All the rooms being in number twelve rooms
Item half an acre of land whereon the house standeth part of it being a garden pailed in and the other part being arable

1642 John Fourness A.M. 1 July 1642. He was displaced by Thomas Scott of Little Marlow, the Regicide; and after the surrender of the Town, 27 April, 1643, a Committee was left here, consisting chiefly of City Captains and tradesmen, who assessed the inhabitants, and fined them at pleasure. Fourness, the vicar, being deemed a malignant, was not permitted to speak, but was fined £10 reduced to £7. They fined Mr Drue in the sum of £1,000; and on his refusal to pay, imprisoned him in a loathsome confinement, without any bed: compelled Mr Horsepoole to pay £200; Mr Chase (who had been previously plundered) £40, but at last reduced that sum to £30; Mr Elliot, a butcher, £100, and imprisoned him; Cocke, a baker £20; John Langley £10; Thomas Langley £20; William Langley, £5; Wilmot his servant £5; and some others….. After the Restoration,

Mr Fourness returned to his vicarage, and held it until his death; being buried here 9 Jan. 1671
(Lipscomb p. 601)

1655 Calamy p. 109
Sutton, Daniel. Lecturer at Great Marlow. 1662.
Trinity Camb. B.A. 1629
M.A. 1632
Vicar of Wetheresfield, Essex 1637
Rector of Cavendish, Suffolk 1645
Adm Marlow 4 May 1655
Ejected 1662
Buried at Marlow 1664
V. there preached funeral sermon

1691 Poor Rate 28 months
Mr Harvey for the Vicarage House at 2d per month 4s 8d

1705 Poor Rate 32 months
Mr Harvey for the Vicarage at 2d per month 5s 4d

1706 Visitation
Mr William Harvey Vicar
The Dean and Chapter of Gloucester patron
It is 3 miles in length 9 or 10 in compass and contains 300 families
The dissenters are generally Presbyterians; some few Anabaptists, and one or two Quakers. There is one meeting house in this parish. Besides these are divers papists: John Brinkhurst Esq of £500 per annum estate; Thomas his brother; Thomas Crompton Esq his uncle; John Abington Esq has £100 a year within this parish, though he be of Worcestershire; wife and 5 children of Mr John Brinkhurst; six of their servants; and 3 others
The vicarage is worth £80 per annum.
Here is a Lecture of £20 per annum. A school endowed with £12 a year at present, but with an estate that will increase in value. An almshouse with £16 per annum endowment.
Gentlemen living in the parish are: Sir James Etheridge Kt, John Brinkhurst Esq, John Abington at a seat called Seymours, and Thomas Crompton Esq

1797 Langley p. 149
The vicarage house is a small mean building in the High Street, with half an acre of land behind, which is all the glebe belonging to it.

1830 Directory Coxwell, Rev Thomas Tracy High Street

1851 Census High Street [opposite Vicarage]
Rev. Frederick Bussell 32

1851 Church Rate Book [next Cromwell House]
Rev Frederick Bussell

Congregational

CONGREGATION CHURCH

1691 8 Oct. Quarter Sessions The dwelling Houses of the following persons were registered as public meeting houses under I William & Mary Ch. 18 Sec 19
Samuel Lynn of Great Marlow (whose house, called “The Broad Arrow” was late in the tenure of William Hopkins)

1691 12 Jan. Quarter Sessions
The dwelling Houses of the following persons were registered as public meeting houses
The upper barn of Richard Langley’s house at Great Marlow (now in the occupation of William Alice, senior, and Stephen Steevens

1692 7 April Quarter Sessions
The houses of the following persons were registered as public meeting houses The barn of William Piggott’s house at Great Marlow (now in the tenure of William Harman)

1703 13 Jan. Quarter Sessions
House of John Gidley of Great Marlow registered as a meeting house
N.B. Calamy 1713 lists John Godley M.A. of Exeter College, ejected 1662, under Devon but does not give the parish. He settled at Great Marlow in Buckinghamshire where he died not long since.
Longer entry under Devon in 1775 edition
Mr John Godley M.A. of Exeter College Oxford. He also had received Episcopal ordination. He had excellent abilities but was one of the most modest men in the world, so as hardly to be got to say grace at table. He lived at Exeter upon his own estate, and generally occupied the table pew, being with great difficulty got into the pulpit; but whenever he did enter it, he met with good acceptance. The other ministers in the city much esteemed him for learning and ministerial abilities.
He settled at Great Marlow in Buckinghamshire where he died.

1715 Rev. John Benson

1726 Notes in Minute Book of Marlow Congregational Church
See: Records of Bucks Vol 15 p. 6 1947
Contract for Richard Webb to build new Dissenting Chapel in Marlow
The old pulpit with its stairs and sounding board together with the table pew from the old meeting house, should be placed in the new building

1750 Presbyterians ceased to meet by mid 18th century

1777 New Independent meeting formed

1779 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/268/403073
Thomas Rickett papermaker & mealman and the Rev John Wheeler
Both of Great Marlow Co Bucks
In trust for the Dissenting Congregation of Great Marlow aforesaid
On the Dissenting Meeting House and Tenement under one roof in the tenure of the said Rev John Wheeler £480
Warehouse & offices under one roof separate £20

1827 Monument in Congregational Church to Daniel Humphreys and Sarah his wife

1838 Land for new Congregational Church given by Sir William Clayton bart

1839 14 May D CE M 585
1) William Wright of Great Marlow paper manufacturer
Joseph Wright of Great Marlow paper manufacturer
Hezekiah Groom of Great Marlow draper
William Gregory of Great Marlow chemist
John Morgan of Great Marlow draper
Rev Thomas Styles of Great Marlow dissenting minister
James Spicer of New Bridge Street City of London stationer
2) Thomas Styles
William Gregory
John Morgan
Hezekiah Groom
George Joseph Dyson of Great Marlow gent
James Spicer
Samuel Washbourn
William Leving of Great Marlow draper
3) Sir William Robert Clayton of Harleyford bart

Right of way to New Meeting House

1840 Present chapel built to designs of James Fenton of Chelmsford
with brick pillasters and stone detailing was opened in 1840.

1851 Religious Census
Independent or Congregationalists Salem Chapel, Quoiting Place.
Erected 1840. Whether Separate yes. Whether Exclusive yes.
Free Sittings 130; Other Sittings 340.
On the 30th March
Morning General Congregation Abt. 200, Sunday Scholars abt. 40, Total 240
Afternoon No public service;
Evening General Congregation abt 200, Total 200.
Remarks The Annexed Return does not give a just Criterion of Attendance either with respect to chapel or Sunday School for reasons I am not at liberty to state, J.W.
Dated 31st March.
Signed Joseph Wright, Deacon, Marlow Mill.
1863 Enlarged to provide 500 sittings.

Ministers

1693 Meeting of Protestant Dissenters under Samuel Pomfret
1703 John Gidley House licensed for dissenter's to worship
1715 – 1724 John Benson
1725 Thomas Pitkin/Polken (Church temporarily closed)
1770 – 1776 Samuel Stevens
1777 – 1785 John Wheeler
1785 – 1794 Robert Allen
1794 – 1803 Richard Frome
1806 – 1825 George Edwards
1825 – 1863 Thomas Styles (Present Church opened July 1st 1840)
1864 – 1866 Andrew Mearns
1866 – 1868 John Briggs
1868 – 1870 James Mountain
1871 – 1875 W. J. Roome
1875 – 1879 D. W. Evans
1880 – 1882 William Morton Mather
1882 – 1883 Alexander Henderson
1884 – 1892 John Frederick Morgan Glanville
1892 – 1908 Frederick Tavender, BA, BD
1908 - 1932 George Henry Jones
1934 – 1945 Ernest Eldred Marks
1946 – 1950 Hubert John Haggett
1950 – 1965 Fred Horrox, MA
1965 – 1972 Geoffrey Walker
1973 – 1980 Winston S. Reed
1980 – 1986 Arthur Leitch MacArthur, OBE, MA, MLITT

 

Holy_Trinity

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

1852 Holy Trinity Church, built in Gun Lane in 1852, provided the poor but growing area to the north of the town with seats for 200. Architect George Gilbert Scott.

Methodist

METHODIST CHURCH

1900 The Wesleyan Chapel in Spittal Street was rebuilt in 1900 and could seat 350.

Primitive

PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH

1851 Religious Census
Primitive Methodist Chapel
Erected 1841. Whether Separate and Entire both. Whether Exclusive for a place of worship and school.
Free Sittings 150; Other Sittings 100; Free Space aisle.
On the 30th March
Morning 100, Afternoon 150; evening 200.
Average Attendance during previous 12 months
Morning General Congregation 50, Sunday Scholars Total 100;
Afternoon General Congregation 100, Sunday Scholars 50, Total 150;
Evening General Congregation 200, Total 200.
Dated 30th March
Signed James Frewing, Joseph Clarke, Dean Street, Great Marlow

Catholic

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

1717 Quarter Sessions: Land of Roman Catholics
Thomas Abington
Manor House called Seymeres Court in Great Marlow in occ Thomas Parry gent or his undertenants
House in Great Marlow in occ Robert Corbey
Farm in Great Marlow in occ Robert Corbey
The above by virtue of a lease by Thomas Parry 6 Oct 1712 from the said Thomas Abington all of which he holds on lease of the Dean and Chapter of Bristol
House etc (named) in Great Marlow in occ ….. and Robert Corbey
Woods etc (names given) in Great Marlow
Wharf etc ad joining Marlow Bridge in occ …. Gibbons

1723 Quarter Sessions Lands of Roman Catholics
Ambrose Smith of Great Marlow timber dealer
Cottage in Great Marlow in own poss
Cottage in Great Marlow let to William Tyler
Cottage in Great Marlow let to Ann Cheeseman widow

1727 13 April Quarter Sessions Land of Roman Catholics
John Brinckhurst of Great Marlow
Freehold house lands etc at The Moore in the parish of Great Marlow in own possession
Farm land etc at the Moore in Great Marlow leased by an indenture to Richard Reading together with tenement barns etc in Lewknor
Cottage etc at the Moore in Great Marlow let to Mary Forster widow

1727 2 June Quarter Sessions Land of Roman Catholics
Sarah Brinckhurst of the Moore Place in Great Marlow widow of John Brinckhurst
Messuages and lands in Hambleden in possession of Daniel Deane and John Twinch or their undertenants

1846 The Roman Catholic church on St. Peter's Street is so near to the old Parsonage and its gothic architecture so authentic that it is difficult to believe that it was built as recently as 1846. The architect was Pugin and the cost was borne by Charles Scott-Murray, the squire of nearby Medmenham, who had recently converted to Catholicism. A school, also
designed by Pugin,was built to the south of the Roman Catholic Church, and included this fine house for the schoolmaster

1851 Religious Census
St Peter’s Catholic Church St Peter’s Street
Erected in the year 1847. Whether Separate yes. Whether Exclusive yes
Free Sittings 120;Other Sittings 12; Free Space about 50.
On the 30th March
Morning General Congregation 56,Sunday Scholars 37, Total 93;
Afternoon no service;
Evening General Congregation 58, Sunday Scholars 10, Total 68.
Average Attendance during previous 12 Months
Morning General Congregation 65, Sunday Scholars 40, Total 105.
Dated 31st March. Signed John Morris, Priest, St. Peter's Church, Great Marlow.

 

Wesleyan

WESLEYAN CHURCH

1851 Religious Census
Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Erected 1810. Whether Separate yes. Whether Exclusive yes.
Free Sittings 70; Other Sittings 130.
On the 30th March
Morning General Congregation 80, Sunday Scholars 50, Total 130;
Afternoon General Congregation 60, Sunday Scholars 50, Total 110;
Evening General Congregation 160, Sunday Scholars 10, Total 170.
Average Attendance during previous 12 months
Morning General Congregation 85, Sunday Scholars 50, Total 135,
Afternoon General Congregation 70, Sunday Scholars 50, Total120;
Evening General Congregation 160, Sunday Scholars 10, Total 170.
Dated First April.
Signed Thomas Edward Dukes Chapel Steward, West Street, Great Marlow.

Great Marlow Almshouses

Introduction

Data provided by Julian Hunt, see Julian Hunt's Local History website.

He gathered the material in preparation for the book Marlow - A Pictorial History and has kindly allowed the Buckinghamshire Family History Society to reproduce it here

1610

1610 20th July Charity Commissioners
1) John Brinkhurst
2) Sir William Borlase & 11 others
All that messuage or tenement situate at the end of Marlow Bridge, within the parish of Great Marlow, and all that barn curtilage and barn houses adjoining the Parsonage Lane in Great Marlow, and the close near the Thames side within the said parish called Pond Close, and 3a
1r 0p of arable land in the great common field, and all those four small tenements then used by the said John Brinkhurst as almshouses built for poor people, situate in Oxford Lane by Mearefield Gate in the parish of Great Marlow, with all and singular the appurtenances to hold to the said trustees and their heirs to the use of John Brinkhurst for his life, and after his decease to the use of the said trustees….


1614

1614 Death of John Brinkhurst succeeded by nephew John Brinkhurst


1827

1827 Property of Oxford Lane Almshouses Charity Commissioners
1) Three houses in Peter Street, a wharf on the bank of the Thames, and 3a 1r of land in a field called Marlow Field, let on lease for 21 years commencing 25 March 1822, to Thomas Gibbons as yearly tenant, at a rent of £35
2) A house in Church Lane called the Barge Pole, let on lease for 21 years commencing 29 September 1822, to Thomas Wethered Esq at a rent of £15 per annum.
3) A house at the corner of Peter Street, let to Lydia Beenham, as yearly tenant, at a rent of £8 8s.
4) A house and shop in Church Lane, let to Ann Wix, as yearly tenant, at a rent of £6 6s.
5) A piece of ground adjoining Mr Thomas Gibbon’s wharf, let on lease for 21 years commencing Lady Day 1827, to the late Sir James N Morris, at the yearly rent of £5 5s. This lease is now vested in his widow Lady Morris


1861

1861 17 July Thames Lawn Deeds via Mark Wyatt
1) Sir William Robert Clayton of Harleyford bart
William Wright of Marlow Mills paper manufacturer
Owen Wethered of Marlow Esq
Rev Frederick Bussell Lieut Gen in H.M. Army
Lawrence William Wethered of Marlow Esq
Peter Borgnis of Marlow Esq
Thomas Rolls of Marlow coal merchant
Rev Francis Ashpitel formerly of Lane End Fingest now of Great Hampden clerk
George Henry Vansittart of Bisham Abbey Esq
Rev Thomas Edward Powell of Bisham clerk
Rev Wadham Huntley Skrine of Camley Corner Bisham clerk
[Trustees of Brinckhurst's Charity]
2) Thomas Somers Cocks of Thames Bank Marlow Esq
£1,100

All that Wharf situate lying and being on the North East side of St Peter Street in Great Marlow aforesaid fronting the River Thames together with the small piece of garden or shrubbery land adjoining the same on the north east side thereof which said Wharf and piece of land were formerly called Pond Close many years since in the occupation of John Pond afterwards in the occupation of Thomas Gibbons the elder then in the several occupations of Sir Thomas Nicoll Morris and Thomas Gibbons the younger but now of Thomas Somers Cox and Messrs William Edward and Sydney James Gibbons
Schedule begins with foundation deed to John Brinkhurst’s almshouses, Oxford Lane, 20 July1610


1873

1873 2 Dec Charity Commissioners
Consent for sale of property at Church Passage



1874

1874 18 May Michael Davies’s Deeds
1) Trustees of Brinckhurst Almshouses Charity
Lawrence William Wethered of Stubbings House Maidenhead
Peter Bornis of Highfields Great Marlow
Rev. Francis Ashpitel late of Lane End, Fingest but then of Great Hampden
George henry Vansittart of Bisham Abbey
Rev. Thomas Edward Powell of Bisham
Rev. Wadham Huntley Skrine of Bisham
2) Hoare’s Trustees
£1,333 6s 8d

Site of Barge Pole Inn now closed
(14) Farrier’s Shop
(15) Farrier’s Shed
(16) Cottage in occ J Truss
(17) Cottage in occ J Collins
(18) Shed in occ J Truss
(19) Cottage in occ widow Heath
(20) Cottage in occ W Shaw jun
(21) Cottage in occ W Shaw sen
(22) Shed

[Numbers from Dickinson’s plan 1991]


1969

1969 Almshouses demolished and replaced by flats.

Great Marlow Breweries

Data provided by Julian Hunt, see Julian Hunt's Local History website.

He gathered the material in preparation for the book Marlow - A Pictorial History and has kindly allowed the Buckinghamshire Family History Society to reproduce it here

Brewery_1


1607 23 March Quitclaim D-CE/M330
1) John Ponde of Marlow gent
2) John Brinckhurst of Lane End gent
House where Ponde and formerly Michael Turner dwells adjoining the Churchyard, and house called the Brewhouse belonging to it

1610 5 June Settlement D-CE/M66
1) Roger Smythe, yeoman
2) Richard Hill, yeoman
William Childe, bere brewer, of Marlowe, in trust for his sons John, citizen and salter of London, and Valiantus, of Wooburn, Showmaker, (who are bound to him, 31 May 1610, in £300 for payments of £120 to be appointed in his will) for their lives, and their heirs.
Same property.

1617 27 Nov. Bargain & Sale/Feoffment D-CE/M67
1) Roger, John and Valleantus (of Walton on Thames, chandler) Smyth
2) Edward Wooden of Marlowe, brewer.
Same property – Hughe Priest, E, Roger Hayward, W - for £300.

1632 1 February Assignment D-CE/M59
1) John Farmer, gent
2) John Moore, brewer.
His interest in a Patent, 22 June 1625, licensing them to retail wines in Great Marlow for life.

1653 24 Dec. Will of John Moore of Great Marlow brewer
To be buried in the Church of Great Marlow as near to my late wife as conveniently may be
I give and bequeath to my eldest son John Moore upon the provisos and conditions hereafter mentioned and expressed the sum of £100 of
current money to be paid to him three months after my decease he giving a general release of all demands unto his brother my son Thomas Moore
and also he living lovingly and friendly with his said brother Thomas and other his brothers And also that he my said son John do not or shall
not by himself or by any other by his meanes or procurement do or cause to be done any act or thing whereby to hinder or prejudice my said son
Thomas Moore in the trade of a brewer which he now useth
Item I further give and bequeathunto my said son John Moore during his natural life the sum of £30 yearly to be paid half yearly at our Lady Day and the Feast of St Michael Tharchangel by equal portions to be issuing and payable to him my said son John Moore out of my lands and hereditaments hereafter mentioned That is to say All that my Tavern and Inn called or known by the name or sign of the Angel and my Inn called the Bullhead in Great Marlow aforesaid and out of all my lands and hereditaments in cookham in the County of Berks with power for him to distrain for the said yearly sum …. And further upon this condition that my said son John Moore shall permit and suffer my said son Thomas Moore and his assignsquietly to hold use and enjoy the Store house at the Wharf where the said John now dwelleth with free liberty of ingregress egress and regress to and from the same in such manner as myseld have had and used to do according to my lease which I have of the same
Item I give and bequeath unto my son Robert Moore the sum of £300 of current money to be paid within one year next after my decease ….
Item I give and bequeath unto my son Francis Moore the sum of £100 ….
I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren the six children of my son in law Robert Fish the sum of £20 apiece of current money to be paid to the sons at their respective ages of one and twenty years apiece and to the daughters at their respective ages of eighteen years apiece ….
I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Moore all my messuages lands tenements inns and hereditaments with their and every of their rights members and appurtenances whatsoever in the said County of Bucks or elsewhere (that is to say) As for and concerning my now dwelling house wherein I now dwell with the brewhouses malthouses barns stables outhouses orchards gardens backsides and appurtenances whatsoever
thereunto belonging with all the coppers furnaces vats barrels and kilderkins and all other vessels now or hereafter used with or leonging to
the said brehouse and malting houses …. for default to my said son John Moore …. for default to my said son Robert Moore …. and for default to my said son Francis Moore….
I give and bequeath to Anne Moore the wife of my said son John Moore £5 a year ….
I give and bequeath unto my sister in law Ann the wife of Hugh Harman 20s and to her daughter my goddaughter Mary the sum of 10s
I give and bequeath unto my sister in law Mary the wife of John Hawes 20s
I give unto the poor of Great Marlow the sum of £5
I give unto the poor of Bisham the sum of 20s
I give unto the poor of Beaconsfield where I was born the sum of 20s
The rest and residue of all my goods cattle chatells and personal estate unbequeathed my debts being paid and funerals and legacies discharged I give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Moore who I make and ordain full and sole executor

Proved by Thomas Moore 22 Feb 1654

1664 10 Oct Bap Katherine dau Robert Moore & Joanne [Doyley]

1671 21 Nov Will of Thomas Moore of Great Marlow gent
Body to be buried in the Parish Church of Great Marlow near to my father and mother
I give and bequeath to my kinsman James Fish all that plot of ground I purchased of John Webb called Acre Hanger in consideration of a legacy given by his grandfather
I give and bequeath to Samuel Fish 40s
I give and bequeath toJoane the daughter of Edward Fish deceased 50s
I give and bequeath to Thomas Lees son of John Lee and my kinswoman Anne his wife deceased twenty marks the year during the life of my executor Robert Moore to be paid yearly towards his education
I give unto the widow Harman £5 the year during her life
I give unto the widow Hawes 20s to buy a ring
I give to the poor of the parish of Great Marlow £10
I give unto Ralph Moore 20s to buy him a ring
I give unto his wife 20s to buy her a ring
I give unto his son Thomas Moore 20s to buy him a ring
All my estate goods chattels leases land houses and what else soever within the Kingdom of England which is not by me in these presents formerly bequeathed I give and bequeath unto my brother Robert Moore making him the full and sole executor of this my last will
Proved by Robert Moore 24 March 1672

1673 21 June Deed to declare uses of a fine and recovery D/CE/M/96
1) Robert Moore
2) Thomas Medlycott of Middle Temple gent
3) Winckles
Moore’s house and brewhouse in lower end of High Street, with barn and stable on west thereof and 3r adjoining between Thomas Emerson Esq’s land north west, Butt Close, the way to Goblin Pitts, and the Common Pound south west
The Black Boy, on west side of High Street, Goblins Pitts west, Richard Ingram north, house now annexed to Moor’s brewhouse south

1678 Poor Rate
Robert Fortune for the Wharf 28 months at 1s per month £1 8 0

1681 20 July Will of Robert Moore of Great Marlow gent
I give to the poor of the Parish of Great Marlow £10
I give towards the reparation of Great Marlow Bridge the sum of 5
I give to each of my servants which shall be living with me at the time of my decease 20s
I give to my brother in laws Laud Doyley Thomas Doyley Robert Doyley and Thomas Winckles severally the sum of 20s to buy each of them rings if they please
I give to my uncle Ralph Moore and to his sister my Aunt 20s apiece and to his son Thomas Moore 10s
And to my Aunt Hawes 20s
I give to my son in law Andrew Dominick and to Johane his wife 20s apiece to buy them rings
I give to my nephews Samuel Fish and Henry Fish the sum of £4 apiece
I give to Johane the daughter of my kinsman Edward Fish deceased the sum of 50s
I give unto Thomas Powell the son of Mary sister to my nephew Samuel Fish the sum of £10
I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Johane Moore All the goods and household stuff that are now in my possession or elsewhere that are undisposed of which were formerly the goods of John Langley her former husband deceased excepting all my other goods to my disposal by this my will I do further give unto my said wife one annuity or yearly rent of £40 per annum in case she live sole and unmarried and after her intermarriage only £30 per annum to be issuing and payable to the said Johane my wife and her assigns during the residue of the life out of all those my two farms with my land tenements and appurtenances thereto belonging called or known by the several names of Becking and Hooks situate lying and being in Great Marlow
I give unto my cousin Thomas Lee of Great Marlow aforesaid all that my messuage or tenement with the lands and appurtenances thereunto
belonging and therewithal used situate at Cookham in the County of Berks
I do hereby further will and appoint that my wife shall have the use of one room above stairs and likewise the use of the kitchen for the necessary occasions where I now live and the liberty of the Brewhouse and yard and freedom to go into the garden and orchard at all times
during the will and pleasure of my executor before the intermarriage of my daughter Katherine and for and during so long time after the intermarriage of my said daughter as my said daughter shall allow and no longer
I do give and bequeath unto my loving and dutiful daughter Katherine Moore all my rings jewels plate and ready money that shall be in my house at the time of my decease
I do hereby nominate and appoint Thomas Hobby late of Bisham Esq and Edward Baldwyn of Beaconsfield Esq and my wife Johane Moore to be executors of this my last will and testament to whom after my funeral debts and legacies paid I give and bequeath all my goods chattels and personal estate whatsoever
And also I do give and bequeath unto my said executoss Thomas Hobby Edward Baldwin and Johane Moore and their heirs all my messauges lands tenements and hereditaments whatsoever situate in Great Marlow aforesaid in trust nevertheless and to this intent and purpose only that my said executors shall dispose of my personal estate and also shall receive the rents issues and profits of all my said lands and tenements
whatsoever to the only use and behoof of my daughter Katherine until she shall be married or attain the age of one and twenty years And I do hereby appoint the said Thomas Hobby Edward Baldwin to be guardians of my said daughter until her marriage or age of one and twenty years as aforesaid And I do hereby desire my said daughter to be advised by her said guardians and by her mother (in the great affair of the disposal of herself in marriage) upon whose integrity I do very much rely

1681 28 Sept Inventory of Robert Moore gent of Great Marlow
In the Brewhouse one Copper 30 0 0
One Mash Tunn 8 0 0
One guile Tunn 2 0 0
Foure Coulers 8 0 0
One Leaden back and pump 15 0 0
Two trofes 2 10 0
One Floate 0 10 0
One….backe 2 0 0
Three standand one Peale 0 5 0

In the severall Inns of the said Mr Moores called the King’s Head,
the Bull’s Head, the Bare and the Crowne several tables bed
steads forms stools and other moveables 10 0 0

1681 30 Dec Probate of Will of Robert Moore of Great Marlow gent P.C.C.

1683 6 Nov James Etheridge m. Katherine Moore

1685 Poor rate
Robert Fortune for the Wharf £1 6 0

1686 22 Jan, Deed to Lead to Uses of a Fine D-CE/M128
1) Sir James Etheredge and Katharine his wife
2) George Bruere of the Middle Temple gent
Thomas Bigg of Chopping Wyoombe gent
3) Thomas Medlicott of Abington, Co. Oxon.,Esq
Laud Doyley of St.Paul Covent Garden. Co Midd. gent.

Etheredges to assure to Bruere and Bigg; property marked x to the use of Sir James; the residue to use of him and Katherine for life, and their children, and to use of Medlicott and Doyley for preserving the contingent remainders in the said children, during the lives of James and Katherine.
House-where Sir James lives, and la. plot adjacent Lady Etheredge’s house occupied Ralph Harman, NW, way to Goblins pits, SW, highway, E; and la. In The Ham, occupied Wm. Harman.
The Black Boy occupied R. Harman - Stephen Chase Esq., NW, K.Etheredge’s dwelling, S
The Crown - John Langley, E, late Roger Hayward, W
X And 2 half-acres on N side, in Meere Feild, occupied Peter Rivers.
X The Feathers, late occupied John Collins, now Francis Pagett.
X The Beare inn, occupied by Ric. Clarke, and 13a arable in the common fields
X The Bullhead inn, occupied John Clarke
8 a. arable in common fields -
½ a. - late John Langley, s. Henry Micklem, N, abutting land by Goodyers hedge, W.
la. – John Farmer, E, John Godfrey, W, abth. Millway, N, J. Crodfrey, S.
½ a. in Upper Furlong - late Mr J. Farmer, W, Lord Pagett, E, abtg. Dunmore, S.
3 half-acres - Mill garden hedge, S.
3 half-acres - W of Parsonage Elms-Chapple End road, and 3 half-acres E of this road
½ a. shooting on Ivens Field between J, Farmer and J. Langley
½ a. abtg. Road to Gallow Gate, near the gate, N, and late Thomas Langley, sr.,E.
The Greate House, and la. meadow behind, in High St. occupied Mr Andrew Dominick.
X The Kings Head inn, and l ½ a. close of pasture adj. 1 ½ a. meadow or pasture adj. Goblins pits or Aldermary Lakes, l ½ a, meadow in Wynch Mead. All occupied by Joane Pomfrett, widow.
Lady Croft als. Virgin Coppice in Pare Croft - 2a. wood, adjoining Hookes Ground. Gosnam Meade with Gosnam Ditch - 8a. meadow,
occupied Ric. Corteee. Amy croft - 11a. wood, “Beokett”, W & N, lane to Finamore, S, late John Brinckhurst, E.
8a. arable in Great Common Feild, occupied Roger Hayward
4a. in Middle Furlong - John Langley, dec'd,, E, Bottom Farm, now Burfords, W, N & S.. 2a. near Parsonage Elms - la. belonging to the
Bridge, occupied Hayward, shooting between them, late John Langley, E. & W. (See M. 113-9)
3a. arable in Great Common Feild - Bakers Path, N, Wm carter W, former parcel of Leymors Farm in Little Marlow, occupied R. Hayward.
(See M. 114-9.)
X 4a. arable in Great Common Feild, late the Tye Piece - Widow Eliz. Elyott, E & S, John Hearne's meadow near Goshenham Ditch, SW, Edw. Shanok and Anthony Turberfeld, esq., N & W. (3ee M. 115-9)
Lake of pasture - 3a. near The Ham. Court Feild, 26a.. The two Horse Leas and The Lakes - 9a. meadow and pasture. Aldermany Lakes -5a. meadow & pasture. Acrehanger (close) - 2a. arable, - Kingshold, occupied John Harmond, E, Gyles Durvall, W, abtg. West Street, S.
Schoolhouse Close - 2a. meadow or pasture, occupied Wm. Harmon, - West St.,N, Church Land, E, Aldermary Lakes, S, Bridgeland, W. (See M. 120-4)
X Noemans - 12p., on W of Oxford Lane, adj, Richard Langley'e orchard, W, occupied by Wm. Alce.
X The Courthouse, wharf, brewhouse, and 3a. close adj.
Property in Cookham, co. Berks.

1687 Poor rate
Mr Fortune for the Wharf at 1s 3d £1 15 0

1688 Poor rate
Mr Geary for the Wharf & premises at 1s 3d £2 0 0

1688 10 May Mortgage for £670 D-CE/M134
1) Etheredge
2) Appleton.
Tenement, brewhouse, wharf close, garden, etc. - 3a., former occupier Anne Moore, widow, now dec'd., since, Robert Fortune, now Richard Collins and Jasper Geary. Schedule of brewing vessels:- Copper, Marsh Tunn, Huile Tunn, leaden back, fower coolers, Two Troughs, One
Floate, One underback, Leaden liquor pump, Three stands, One Iron Peele.
Endorsed - Several receipts for interest and principle.

1689 Poor Rate Mr Geary for part of the Wharf 9d per month £1 8 0
John Stevens for the Wharf & house 1s per month £1 4 0

1690 Poor Rate Mr Geary for part of the Wharf 9d per month £1 8 0
John Stevens for the Wharf & house 1s per month £1 4 0

1691 Poor Rate for 28 months
Mr Geary or Jeremiah Goodchild for part of the Wharf at 9d per month £1 1s 0d
John Stevens for the house and part of the wharf at 1s per month
£1 8s 0d

1692 Poor Rate for 28 months
Mr Geary Jeremiah Goodchild & Cornelius Latemore for part of the Wharf at 9d per month 19s 6d
John Stevens for the wharf & house at 1s per month £1 8s 0d

1693 Poor Rate
Cornelius Latemore for the Brewhouse at 9d per month £1 4 0
John Stevens for the Wharf at 1s per month £1 12 0

1701 Poor Rate
Cornelius Latemore for the Brewhouse at 8d per month £1 4 0
John Stevens for the Wharf at 10d per month £1 10 0

1703 Poor Rate
Cornelius Latemore for the Brewhouse at 8d per month 18s 8d
John Stevens for the Wharf at 10d per month £1 15 0

1704 Poor rate
John Stevens for the Wharf at 10d per month £1 16 8
For the Brewhouse at ……

1705 Poor Rate 32 months
John Stevens for the Wharf at 10d per month £1 6s 8d
Mr Brewer for the Brewhouse at 6d per month 16s

1706 Poor Rate John Stevens for the Wharf at 10d per month £2 3 4
Mr Brewer for the Brewhouse at 6d per month £1 6 0

1715 16 Dec. Will of Cornelius Latemir of Great Marlow brewer
I give and bequeath to my four children (that is to say) to my son John Latemir Mary Latemir Ann Latemir and Dorathy Latemir to each of them one shilling together with my blessing desiring all of them to be dutiful and obedient to their mother and loving and kind to each other
I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Elizabeth Latemir all my messuages or cottages and premises to them belonging together with my
leases stocks in trade moneys goods chattels and all my personal estate whatsoever
I do hereby make declare and appoint my said loving wife Elizabeth Latemir my full and sole executrix
Probate 24 Feb 1716

1717 15 March
1) Sir James Etheridge
2) Sir John Guise of Rendcombe Glous
Let to Mr Samuel Manning and George Bruere Esq £81
Brewhouse and Wharf 4acres
In Common Fields 32 acres
Let (for 10 years yet to come) at £71 p.a. to be advanced £5, 2 years hence
Paine’s land 3 closes let to Mr Bruere at £10

1721 Marlow Church Plaque inside Church
Morris son of George Bruerre Armr. Born 5 March 1704, died 26 April 1721

1729 19 March Bond in £120. D-CE/M489
1)John Lattimore of Marlow, brewer
2)John Lacye of Maidenhead, hostler, to secure payment of £70
Re White Hart

1735 21 May Bargain and Sale D/CE/M/320
1) Sir John Guise of Reedcombe co Glous bart only son & heir of Sir John Guise late of
Elmore in the said County bart deceased
James Pitt of City of Gloucester gent
2) Sir William Clayton. Of Marden Co Surrey bart
All those the manors or reputed manors of Great Marlow and Harleyford
All that chief mansion or manor house of Great Marlow aforesaid commonly known or called by the name of Court House
And all wharfs brewhouses and hereditaments whatsoever thereunto belonging or therewith used situate lying and being in Great Marlow
aforesaid and now or late in the tenure or occupation of the said Lattimore
And all that close in Great Marlow aforesaid containing by estimation three acres be the same more or less lying and being behind the said mansion or manor house with all common fishing and commodities whatsoever thereunto belonging and also now or late in the tenure or
occupation of the saidLattimore [note in margin ‘now part of Roses’]

1735 2 August Will of Elizabeth Lattemore of Great Marlow widow
Dau Elizabeth wife of William Langley of Great Marlow mealman
Dau Mary Lattmore £200, all stock in trade, household goods, money, plate, rings wearing apparel
Dau Anne wife of James Howard of Great Marlow ropemaker £200
Remainder to son John Lattemore
Executor dau Mary Lattemore

1736 1 Dec Will of John Lattimer of Great Marlow brewer
Wife Mary
Freehold estate tanyard and other premises in parish of Bray Co Berks purchased of Ann Murden
Messuage or tenement malthouse and appurts situate in the town of Great Marlow Co Bucks which I lately purchased from John Saunders
Two messuages or tenements with appurts in West End of the said town of Great Marlow lately purchased from widow Howard and others and built thereon one new tenement
One other messuage or tenement all thereunto belonging which I lately purchased from Richard Webb
One other messuage or tenement with all thereunto belonging which I lately purchased from John Laws
Which said last mentioned tenements are situate in West End aforesaid
All those several messuages or tenements in Chappel End on the East side of the said Town of Great Marlow lately purchased from the said John Laws
Two messuages or tenements situate in Well End in said town of Great Marlow purchased from William Haychraft
One other cottage or tenement situate in Well End lately purchased from Robert Ewing and others
Three several messuages situate in Great Marlow near the Pound lately left me by the last will and testament of my mother Elizabeth Lattimer
Two messuages in Chepping Wycombe in a place called Back lane purchased from Edward Easly
Messuage or tenement in Burnham in occ Simon Southery
Messuage in Walgrave Co Berks in occ John Bassett
Executor wife Mary Lattimer
Proved 4 April 1744 by Mary Lattemore widow relict

1745 14/15 February Lease & Release D-CE/M487-8
1)Langley
2)Mary Lattemore of Marlow, widow.
Consideration £130.
The White Hart and brewhouse, occupied by Menday

1758 21 Oct Will of Daniel Lofting of Great Marlow gent
Brother William Lofting £10
Brother Benjamin Lofting £10
Brother Samuel Lofting £100 + all that messuage cottage or tenement wherein Richard Stevens now dwells situate in Oxford Lane
Godson John Rose son of Ralph Rose the elder of Little Marlow £50
Mrs Mary Latimer £5
Mary Holmes £5
Ralph Rose the younger of Great Marlow brewer all and every my messuages cottages lands tenements hereditaments and premises whatsoever and wheresoever and not herein before otherwise disposed of both freehold and leasehold situate lying and being in Great Marlow aforesaid

1761 10 October Counterpart Lease for 21 Years D-CE/M492
1)Mary Lattemore
2)Ralph Rose, jr., of Marlow, brewer.
The Duke's Head on north side of West Street, occupied by Elizabeth Wright, widow.
The White Hart on north side of Chapel End, occupied by John Dormer.
The Anchor in Cookham, occupied by Joseph Charters.
Rent £20. 10s.

1783 Land Tax Parish
Wm Clayton Esq Brewhouse & Wharf: Mr John Chark £5 4s 0d

1795 Land Tax Parish
Wm Clayton Esq for Wharf: Mr Williams £5 4s 0d

1800 Near this place lie interred the remains of Mr Ralph Rose and Mrs Sarah Rose his wife. She departed this life May 26th 1800 aged 63 years. He departed this life August the 30th 1800 aged 67 years.

1802 Poor Rate
John Clark house & workshops £1 8 0
Ditto for land at Red Pits £1 5 6
Ditto for part of Storehouse & wharf £1
Thomas Williams Esq for remainder part of Storehouse & Wharf £3

1804 8 Jan. Will of John Clark of Great Marlow carpenter
I give and devise my cottages or tenements with their appurtenances and all other my real estate in Great Marlow in the County of Bucks unto my wife Catherine for her life and from and after her decease I give and devise the same to my son John and his heirs and assigns
Children Catherine, John Thomas Henry and Elizabeth
Executors wife Sarah and Mr Richard Lovegrove

1804 Poor Rate
John Clark house & workshop now Wm Clark 1 1 0
Ditto for part of Storehouse & wharf now
The Commissioners of the Thames Navigation 1 0 0

1807 John Clark house & workshops 0 14 0
The Commissioners of the Thames Navigation
the part of Storehouse & wharf 1 0 0
O Williams Esq remainder part of Storehouse & Wharf 0 5 6

1831 Land Tax Parish
Owen Williams Esq: himself Wharf £5 4s 0d

 



Brewery_2

1704 9 August Will of James Fish of Great Marlow brewer
To be buried in the chancel of Great Marlow Church
Son James Fish £5 only
All that my house or tenement with the appurts wherein my said son James Fish now dwelleth in Marlow aforesaid unto my dear and loving
wife Elizabeth Fish for ever
I give and devise unto my son Benjamin Fish the other two houses or tenements adjoining to that wherein Richard Harding and Henry
Snelling now dwell in Marlow aforesaid all which three houses or tenements I purchased of Christopher Morgan
I give devise and bequeath unto my three daughters Elizabeth Fish Anne Fish and Katherine Fish their executors and assigns All that my
messuage or tenement with the appurts and a close of pasture ground called Bonners Close thereunto belonging which I purchased of Henry Cane and Elizeus Fletcher and the Brewhouse near adjoining to the said messuage And also all that close of pasture land with the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging which I purchased of William Elliott butcher deceased All which are situate and being in Great Marlow
aforesaid and now in the occupation of Mr Prosser from and immediately after my decease equally to be divided between them my said three daughters share and share alike the Copper and utensils of brewing in the said brewhouse only excepted
And the rest and residue of my estate goods and chattels and the said Copper and utensils of brewing I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth my said wife whom I make and constitute full and sole executrix

Proved 21 Sept 1704

1705 Poor Rate 32 months
James Fish for the Brewery at 2d per month 5s 4d

 

Brewery_3


1744 George Wethered m. Elizabeth Gibbons
George Wethered, son of Edward & Susannah Wethered of Penn (V.C.H.)
1745 Birth of George son of George & Elizabeth Wethered
1757 Death of Elizabeth wife of George Wethered
1758 George Wethered m. Anne Reynolds
1761 Birth of Thomas son of George & Anne Wethered
1780 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/273/412209 Lady Day 1781
George Wethered sen. of Great Marlow in Bucks brewer & Maltster
On his Utensils & Stock in a Malthouse & Storehouse
Under one roof situate as aforesaid
brick plaister & tiled 300

1780 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/273/412210 Lady Day 1781
George Wethered jun. Of Great Marlow in Bucks brewer & Maltster
On his Household Goods in his now Dwelling House & Malthouse
adjoining & communicating situate as aforesaid
brick timber plaister & tiled 50
Utensils & Stock therein 250

1782 Sun Fire Insurance 1963/296/452202
George Wethered sen. of Great Marlow in Bucks brewer & maltster
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House
only situate as aforesaid 120
Wearing Apparel therein 30
Utensils & Stock in a Brewhouse &
four Store Houses communicating with
The said House 550
In the Stable, Storehouse &
Granary adjoining timber & tiled 100
In Robinson’s Storehouse only 400
In Langley’s Storehouse only 200
In the Ship Storehouse only 260
In the Cellar only 40
In a Storehouse at the Coiting Place 300
One House only in the tenure of George
Phelps victualler Timber & tiled 100
Stock in a malthouse only
adjoining timber & tiled 300
All brick & tiled except as above & situate as aforesaid

1782 22 Oct William Hickman m. Ann dau George Wethered
n.b. William Hickman surgeon & apothecary 1794 directory

1783 31 May Will of George Wethered of Marlow brewer
Whereas I now hold by lease from the late Henry Smith a dwellinghouse, malthouse, maltkiln and appurtences situate and being in the East side of High Street in Great Marlow aforesaid and now in the tenure or occupation of my son George Wethered and I have already given to my said son George Wethered the stock utensils and implements of and belonging to the said malthouse, maltkiln and premises in his occupation as aforesaid and all my right and title to the said premises but no regular assignment hath been made of the said lease Now I do hereby ratify and confirm the same unto the said George Wethered to hold unto him his executors administrators and assigns for and during all the residue
and remainder of the said lease paying the rent and performing the covenants on the tenants part to be paid and performed free from all
legacies and bequests hereinafter mentioned
Also I give and bequeath unto the said George Wethered all my woolen wearing apparel to be delivered to him in one month next after my
decease
Also I give and bequeath unto my said son George Wethered the sum of four hundred pounds of lawful money to be paid to him to be paid
to him by two equal payments of two hundred pounds each the first payment to be made within three years next after my decease and the residue to be paid within seven years next after my decease but in case the said George Wethered shall die before either of the said payments shall
become due then I give the said legacy or so much thereof as shall not have been payable unto the children of the said George Wethered equally
if more than one to be paid at their ages of twenty one years and in the mean time the lawful interest thereof from the time the said legacy would have become due to be applied by my executor towards their maintenance and education till their said ages
Also I give and bequeath to my dear wife Ann Wethered the sum of twenty pounds of lawful money and also one half of my household
goods…..
Also I give and bequeath to my said wife Ann Wethered for and during the term of her natural life one annuity or clear yearly sum of
forty pounds of lawful money …..
Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Ann wife of Mr William Hickman the sum of one hundred pounds ….
Also I give and bequeath unto Mr John Reynolds of Long Crendon in the County of Bucks blacksmith and Mr Thomas Langley of Great Marlow aforesaid the sum of five hundred pounds of lawful money in trust to lay out and invest the same in some government funds or securities and to pay the interest or dividends thereof still as the same shall arise to my daughter Ann Hickman….
Also I give and bequeath unto my to son Thomas Wethered all my lease of the malthouse, maltkiln, yard carthouse and appurtenances situate and being in the High Street of Great Marlow aforesaidon the west side therof and which I hold of William Clayton Esq and also all my stock of malt, barley utensils and implements belonging to the said malthouse and the business there carried on and alsoall other and the rest residue and remainder of my goods chattels drays cattle ready money and securities for money book and other debts rights credits and personalestate and effects whatsoever….
And lastly I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said son Thomas Wethered full and sole executor

Witnesses: Henry Allnutt attorney of Great Marlow
Thomas Deverell his clerk

Proved by Thomas Wethered the son 12 July 1783

1783 Land Tax
William Clayton Esq: Mrs Freeman £2 0 0
William Clayton Esq Mr Wethered 16s 0d

1786 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/331/508143 Mid S 1786
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow in Bucks brewer
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House only 100
Wearing Apparel therein 30
Utensils & Stock therein & in the Brewhouse
Store Rooms Granary & Offices communicating 350
In the Stable Storehouse & Granary
adjoining each other timber & tiled 140
In Robinson’s Storehouse only 290
In Hickman’s Storehouses adjoining 240
In the Ship Storehouse only 140
In the Cellar only 30
In his Store room under the dwelling
house of Collins & others 160
In East’s Cellar 100
In the Malthouse & Storehouse adjoining
brick timber & tiled 190
House only in tenure
Phelps brick timber & tiled 100
Utensils & Stock viz: in Monday’s Cellar 40
In Lomax, Cowdery & Mill’s Cellars 90
All brick & tiled except as above and situate
at Great Marlow aforesaid and no hazardous trades therein

1786 Royal Insurance 7253/12/99756 22 Nov. 1786
William Clayton of Harleyford in the Parish of Great Marlow in the County of Bucks Esq
House Bakehouse & Malthouse adj & having communication
Brick plaister & tiled Tenant George Murray baker & Thomas
Wethered maltster 200
House Brewhouse Storehouse & Offices
Tenant Thomas Wethered brewer 250
[N.B. The first house is between the White House and the Lower Crown on the West side of the High Street. The second house is to the
south of the Chequers Inn on the east side of the High Street]

1786 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/338/520427
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow in Bucks brewer
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House only 100
Wearing Apparel therein 30
Utensils & Stock in his Brewhouse Storehouse
Granary & Offices all communicating near 400
In his Stable Storehouse & Granary
all adjoining near timber & tiled 150
In Robinson’s Storehouse only 300
In Hickman/s two Storehouses adjoining near 300
In the Ship Storehouse only 170
In the Ship Cellar 30
In his Store room under Collin’s dwelling house 200
In his Store room under East’s dwelling house 150
In his Malthouse & Storehouse adjoining timber & tiled 300
In Lomax’s Cellar only 35
In John Mill’s Cellar only 35
All brick & tiled except as above and situate at
Great Marlow aforesaid and no hazardous trades therein

1787 Land Tax
William Clayton Esq: late Mrs Freeman £10 £2 0 0

1788 Land Tax
William Clayton Esq: Thos Wethered £10 £2 0 0

1788 Lease for 99 years at £18 p.a.
1) William Clayton
2) Thomas Wethered
Premises formerly Miss Freeman’s boarding school and the Three Tuns Tavern

1788 Datestone TW 1788 outside the back door to offices

1791 Lease
2) Thomas Wethered
White House

1795 Land Tax
Thos Williams Esq: Mr Thos Wethered £2 0 0
Thos Williams Esq: Mr Thos Wethered £1 10 0

1796 Sale of freehold for £400
Premises formerly Miss Freeman’s boarding school and the Three Tuns Tavern with new brewhouse, stable storehouses and premises lately erected and built

1798 Posse Comitatus Great Marlow Borough
Brewers
Joseph Plumridge
Thomas Wethered
Maltsters
George Wethered
George J Wethered
Persons keeping draught horses H W C
Joseph Plumridge 5 2 2
George Wethered - - 2
Mr Thomas Wethered 5 2 1

1800 Land Tax
Thomas Williams Esq: Mr Thomas Wethered £10 £2 0 0

1801 Royal Fire Assurance Mss 7253/43/184777
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow in the County of Bucks brewer
Utensils & Stock in his Malthouse £800
On Beer Casks old lead iron copper and other Stock in a House late Dormers £150
On Beer casks Vats & Stands in a Brehouse now used as a Storehouse only and in three small storehouses all adjoining and communicating separate from the above £1200
On a New Stable separate brick built & tiled £150
On Horses Hay Corn Straw and Garden Tools therein £80
On a Waggon house mill House Malt Lofts over Brewhouse & Shed all adjoining and communicating separate from the above £1200
Warranted not to have any kiln or steam engine therein or adjoining or communicating therewith onn Horses Coals and Casks in the said Waggon House Mill House Brewhouse & Shed and in a Counting House all adjoining and communicating £150
Fixtures and utensils therein £1000
Stock in the said Malt Loft near said Mill House Waggon House & in a Hop Loft over said Brewhouse £1400
Beer & Casks therein and in the said Brewhouse £600
On a large Storehouse separate £200
On Beer Vats Stands & Casks therein £2100
On his now Dwelling House and Offices adjoining each other and the last mentioned but not communicating therewith £600
Furniture £280
Apparel £100
Plate £20
On Beer Wine Spirits & Casks in two cellars under the said Dwelling House £400
On beer & casks in a storeroom adjoining the late James Creases Malthouse in the Lower Crown Yard £50
Utensils and Stock in the said Malthouse late in thetenure of the said James Creas £600
All situate in the High Street in Great Marlow aforesaid
On a public house and offices adjoining known by the sign of the Sun tenant Thomas Plummer victualler situate at Lane End in parish of Great Marlow aforesaid £100
On a dwelling house called the Three Tuns and offices adjoining situate in West Street in Great Marlow aforesaid tenant Ollis victualler £100
On a Dwelling House and offices adjoining tenant John Porteridge victualler and known by the sign of the Red Lion situate in West Street aforesaid £100
On a dwelling House known by the sign of the Hare & Hounds tenant R Corbey victualler situate at Red Pitts in the parish of Great Marlow aforesaid £90
On a Cottage adjoining in the same tenure £40
On a Dwelling House known by the sign of the Chequers tenant M Frier victualler situate at Flackwell Heath in the parish of Chepping Wycombe in the County of Bucks £50
On a Dwelling House known by the sign of the Black Lion tenant Thomas Allen victualler situate at Well End in the parish of Little Marlow in the County of Bucks £100
On a Dwelling House known by the sign of the Queens Head situate at Tylers Green in the parish of Chepping Wycombe aforesaid tenant James Deane victualler £100
On a Cottage adjoining brick & tiled and slated £20
On a Dwelling House called the Rose & Crown and Barn adjoining thatched tenant E Edmunds victualler situate Coldmoram in the parish of Little Marlow aforesaid £60
On a Dwelling House known by the sign of the Swan tenant Edward Chandler victualler situate in the High Street in Beaconsfield in the County of Bucks brick built & tiled £120
On two cottages adjoining in the same tenure near and situate as aforesaid £40
Total £12000

1810 Land Tax
Thomas Wethered Esq: himself £10 £2 0 0

1810 31 Jan. Royal Fire Insurance Mss 7253/4/251745
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow Bucks brewer
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in his Malthouse No 1 having communication with a bakehouse £600
On Utensils and Stock in Trade in his Malthouse No 2 late James Creases Situate near £500
On his Malthouse No 3 situate on the opposite side of the way late James Saunders £350
On Utensils & Stock in Trade therein £500
On a House adjoining not communicating £150
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Malthouse No 4 late Joseph Plumridge £400
On his Brewhouse Millhouse Waggon House adjoining and communicating with Malt Hop & Corn Lofts over warranted there be no steam engine or kiln therein or adjoining or communicating therewith situate detached in the yard behind the Assured dwelling house & malt Storehouse £2000
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in the said Brewhouse Millhouse & Waggon House and in the Malt Hop & Corn Lofts over the same £1500
On a Coopers Shop & Scalding Shed adjoining situate detached about 36 feet from the last mentioned buildings and detached from the Great Storehouse hereafter mentioned by a gateway about 5 feet wide £100
On the said Large Storehouse situate detached about 34 feet from the buildings mentioned in the last article but one £500
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in the said Large Storehouse Vats & the Stock therein in the said building included £5000
On his Dwelling House Two Cellars and offices adjoining each other and the said Large Storehouse but separate therefrom by a party wall without any internal communication therewith except by one doorway only underground opening from the said Storehouse into one of the said cellars £2000
Household Furniture and Wearing Apparel Plate and Printed Books in the said House and offices £1750
On his Utensils & Stock in Trade including his Stock of Wines and other Liquors in his said two cellars £500
On his Privy Woodhouse & Mangling House adjoining each other part timber built and adjoining also to the said dwelling house & Storehouse but having no communication with either £50
On two new Stables and Chaisehouse adjoining with lofts over the same situate detached about 48 feet from the Brewhouse and Millhouse & Waggon House above mentioned £300
On his Utensils & Stock in the said Stables Chaisehouse & lofts over £250
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in two Stables adjoining and in a loft over one of them situate in the yard late George Butlers on the opposite side of the Street part timber built £350
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Storehouse & Loft over adjoining the last mentioned part timber built £150
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Storehouse late dormers situate near £100
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Storehouse and loft over situate near £150
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a shed Storehouse adjoining £50
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Vat Storehouse adjoining £50
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a shed Storehouse adjoining the last mentioned and in a Loft over the same £1300
On Spiritous Liquors Casks Glass Bottles and other Stock in a House near £300
On a Cottage in the occupation of Mr Buffett £100
On a House in the occupation of John Fowler butcher £200
On a Slaughter House near in the same tenure £40
The above buildings are situate in the High Street in Great Marlow aforesaid

1816 25 April Royal Fire Insurance Mss 7253/73/293579
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow Bucks brewer
On Utensils & Trade in his Malthouse No 1 brick lath & plaster built communicating with a bakehouse £700
On Utensils and Trade in his Malthouse No 2 late James Creases near brick lath & plaster built in which high dried malt is made £1000
On his Malthouse No 3 situate on the opposite side of the way late James Saunders brick timber & tiled £350
On Utensils & Trade therein £800
On a House adjoining and communicating with the last mentioned malthouse £100
On a House adjoining the last mentioned but not communicating therewith £150
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Malthouse No 4 brick lath & plaster built late Joseph Plumridge £900
On Utensils & Trade in 2 Storehouses adjoining and 3 lofts over the same brick & timber & tiled near late Joseph Plumridge’s £300
On Utensils & Trade in his Malthouse No. 5 brick built and part hatched situate on the east side of the High Street late Charles Wethered £800
On Utensils & Trade in his Malthouse No. 6 brick & timber & tiled near late Thomas Oxlade £700
Warranted that no high dried malt be made in either of the above malthouses except the Malthouse No. 2 on his Brewhouse Millhouse & Waggon House adjoining and communicating with Malt Hop & Corn Lofts over situate detached in the yard behind the Assured’s Dwelling House and Great Warehouse Warranted there be no steam engine or kiln in adjoining to or communicating therewith £2000
On Utensils & Trade therein £2500
On Liquor Back & Stand adjoining on the south side of the said Brewhouse £50
On the Coopers Shop Scalding Dray Grain Shed Tun & Hemp House all adjoining situate detached from the last mentioned and from the Great Storehouse hereafter mentioned by a gateway about 5 feet wide £150
On the Great Storehouse Fining House & Counting House all adjoining but detached from any of the above buildings £500
On Utensils & Trade therein £4500
On his Dwelling House Two Cellars and offices adjoining each other and the last mentioned but not communication therewith except by one doorway only underground opening from the said Storehouse into one of the said cellars £2000
On Furniture Apparel Plate and Printed Books in the said House and offices £1750
On his Utensils & Trade including his Stock of Wines and other Liquors in the said two cellars £600
On his Privy Woodhouse & Mangling House adjoining each other part timber built and adjoining also to the said dwelling house & Storehouse but having no communication with either £50
On two new Stables and Chaisehouse adjoining with lofts over the same situate detached about 48 feet from the Brewhouse and Millhouse & Waggon House above mentioned £300
On his Utensils & Stock in the said Stables Chaisehouse & lofts over £150
On Utensils & Trade in two Stables adjoining and in a loft over one of them situate in the yard late George Butlers on the opposite side of the Street part timber built £250
On Utensils & Trade in a Storehouse & Loft over adjoining the last mentioned part timber built £150
On Utensils & Trade in a Storehouse late Dormers situate near brick & tiled £100
On Utensils & Trade in a Storehouse and Loft over situate near brick timber & tiled £200
On Utensils & Trade in the Vat Storehouse adjoining £350
On Utensils & Trade in a shed Storehouse adjoining the last mentioned and in a loft over the same £50
On a Cottage in the occupation of Mrs Hawes brick timber & slated £100
On a House in the occupation of John Fowler butcher £200
On a Slaughter House near in the same tenure £40
The above buildings are situate in the High Street in Great Marlow aforesaid

1820 Purchase of freehold of White House

1831 Land Tax
Thos Wethered: himself house £2 0 0
Thos Wethered himself college £9 0 0
C Williams Esq: Thos Wethered Esq malthouse £1 0 0
C Williams Esq Thos Wethered house 14 0

1849 Death of Thomas Wethered aged 88, leaving a fortune of £100,000 and his brewery was producing 24,500 barrels a year.

1851 Census
Owen Wethered 52 In partnership …. employing 47 men

1851 Church Rate Book
Wethered: Owen & Lawrence Wethered
House, garden & orchard High Street
Additional buildings
3 rooms large High Street
Building & Counting House, coopery, scalding sheds,
drayhouse,and stables, 2 stables & cart house High Street
Malthouse, storehouse & carpenter’s shop High Street
Table beer tun room with loft over High Street
Brewhouse buildings with malt lofts &
engine house High Street
Timber yard, saw pit, piggery & store room High Street
Davenport: Owen & Lawrence Wethered
Store Room Pound Lane
TP Williams: Owen & Lawrence Wethered
Malthouse & sheds Lowes Yard
Storehouse, three stables & yard Maddocks Yard
Wethered: Owen & Lawrence Wethered
Cellar West Street
Malthouse Camden’s Yard
Storehouse & lofts Adj Withers

1862 Death of Owen Wethered
Brewery taken over by sons:
Thomas Owen Wethered of Seymour Court
Owen Peel Wethered of White House

1870 Third brother Robert Peel Wethered becomes partner

1872 Wethered's Brewery owned or leased over 100 pubs in Buckinghamshire alone.

1873 Death of Robert Peel Wethered

1881 Census High Street
Frances A Wethered 36 wife of head
Thomas A Wethered 9 son
Evelyn A Wethered 7 dau
Cicely E E 3 dau

1890 New Partners Francis & Walter, sons of Owen Peel Wethered

1890 Retirement of Thomas Owen Wethered. Replaced by son in law John Danvers Power

1899 Business turned into limited liability company Owen Peel Wethered chairman

1908 Death of Owen Peel Wethered. New chairman son Francis Peel Wethered. Col F.E. Stevens managing director

1915 Death of Walter Wethered

Brewery_4


1781 Sun Fire Insurance 11936/3288/436048 Xmas 1781
Joseph Plumridge of Great Marlow Co Bucks maltster & shopkeeper
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House Malthouse & Lofts
adjoining and communicating brick plaister & tiled £50
Utensils & Stock therein £150
Wearing Apparel therein £20
Utensils & Stock in his Brewhouse & Storehouse adjoining brick
& tiled £100

1783 Land Tax
William Clayton Esq: Mr Plumridge 16s 0d
Mrs Plumridge: Mr Goldsmith 16s 0d

1784 Royal Insurance 7253/11/97952 June 1784
Thomas Plumridge of Great Marlow maltster & brewer
On household furniture in his dwelling house malthouse lofts
& storehouse adjoining brick & plaister built & tiled in Great Marlow aforesaid £80
On wearing apparel £20
On utensils & trade £300
On utensils & trade in a Storehouse & Brewhouse adjoining brick & timber built & tiled situate near £150
On utensils & trade in a Storehouse in Daniel Walker’s Yard in Great Marlow aforesaid brick & tiled £80
On a House brick built & tiled situate in Great Marlow aforesaid in the tenure of Thomas Allen £70
TOTAL £700

1786 Midsummer Sun Fire Insurance 11936/331/50814
Joseph Plumridge of Great Marlow Co Bucks brewer & maltster
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House Malthouse & Lofts £80
Adjoining and communicating brick plaister & tiled Utensils & Stock therein £250
Wearing Apparel therein £20
Utensils & Stock viz: in a Brewhouse & Storehouse under one roof near £100
In a Storehouse in Daniel Walker’s yard near £80
House only in the tenure of Thomas Allen victualler £70
All brick & tiled except as above & situate at Great Marlow aforesaid £600

1786 Royal Insurance 7253/12/99756 22 Nov. 1786
William Clayton of Harleyford in the Parish of Great Marlow in the County of Bucks Esq
On a House & Malthouse adj & having communication brick plaister & tiled Tenant Joseph Plumridge £200
Brewhouse Storehouse Stable adj & bel £50

1786 Exmas Sun Fire Insurance 11936/334/513148
Joseph Plumridge of Great Marlow Co Bucks brewer & maltster
On his household goods in his now Dwelling House Malthouse & Lofts
Adjoining and communicating situate as aforesaid brick plaister & tiled £80
Utensils & Stock therein £250
Wearing Apparel therein £20
Utensils & Stock viz: in a Brewhouse & Storehouse under one roof near £100
In a Storehouse only in Walker’s yard near (not an Inn yard) £80
House only in Great Marlow aforesaid in the tenure of Thomas Allen, labourer £70

1791 25 July Will of Sarah Smith of Great Marlow widow
Executors, James Crease of Great Marlow Maltster and Joseph Plumridge of Great Marlow brewer

1794 Directory
Plumridge, Joseph brewer and malster.

1795 Land Tax
Thos Williams Esq: Mr Plumridge 16s 0d
Mrs Martin: Mr Plumridge £4 0s 0d

1798 Posse Comitatus Great Marlow Borough
Brewers
Joseph Plumridge
Persons keeping draught horses H W C
Joseph Plumridge 5 2 2

1798(about)Will of Joseph Plumridge
of Great Marlow brewer made in presence of Joseph Haynes of Great Marlow millwright whilst he was dressing the malt mill belonging to the said deceased and John Smith of Great Marlow stone mason who lived next door to Plumridge
Wife Rebecca
All my personal estate and all my copyhold leasehold and freehold estates…except £20 per annum to be paid to my father James Plumridge and my mother Mary Plumridge during their natural life if not overrun half of the property I die possessed of
After decease of wife Rebecca then to two families:
My godson Joseph Plumridge son of Thomas and Plumridge £10
My godaughter Ann Clark £10
John Plumridge son of Robert and Sarah Plumridge
Executors
Mr John Badger of Bisham
Mr Wildsmith Badger of Great Marlow
Wife Rebecca
Joseph Plumridge died 27 Dec 1809
Will proved 21 Feb 1810 by Wildsmith Badger

1800 Land Tax
Thomas Williams Esq: Mr Joseph Plumridge £0 16 0

1807 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Mr Joseph Plumridge £4 £0 16 0

1809 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: J. Plumridge £4 £0 16 0

1810 3 Jan. Bur Joseph Plumridge aged 61

1810 Great Marlow Parish Church Interior
In memory of Mr Joseph Plumridge who died Dec 27, 1809 aged 61 years.
Also Rebecca his wife who died Feb 26 1810 aged 77 years.
They both lived deservedly respected and died justly lamented.

1810 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: George Goldsmith £4 £0 16 0

1810 31 Jan. Royal Exchange Insurance Mss 7253/4/251745
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow in the County of Bucks brewer
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Malthouse late
Joseph Plumridge’s 400

1814 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: George Goldsmith £4 £0 16 0

1815 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Empty £4 £0 16 0

1816 25 April Royal Fire Insurance Mss 7253/73/293579
Thomas Wethered of Great Marlow Bucks brewer
On Utensils & Stock in Trade in a Malthouse No 4 brick lath & plaster built late Joseph Plumridge £900
On Utensils & Trade in 2 Storehouses adjoining and 3 lofts over the same brick & timber & tiled near late Joseph Plumridge’s £300
On a house situate in Great Marlow Tenant Wm Lilley, victualler, and known by the sign of the Two Brewers £400
On a stable and workshop adjoining near £50

1817 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Empty £4 £0 16 0

1818 Land Tax
Mr Thomas Wethered: house & malthouse
late Plumridges £4 £0 16 0

1819 Land Tax
Mr Thomas Wethered: malthouse
late Plumridges £4 £0 16 0

1820 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: malthouse
late Plumridges £4 £0 16 0

1823 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: malthouse
late Plumridges £4 £0 16 0

1824 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Thos Allum £4 £0 16 0

1825 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Thos Allum £4 £0 16 0

1830 Francis’s Map Mr T.W. Allum near corner of High Street and Pound Lane

1830 Directory
Allum, Thomas William bricklayer High Street

1831 Land Tax
Owen Williams Esq: Thos Allum house £0 16 0

Brewery_5


1774 10 Aug Will of Henry Smith of Great Marlow maltster
Leaves copyhold, leasehold and freehold estates to wife Sarah on her decease to be divided between his four sisters

1778 4 Nov Burial of Henry Smith

1783 Land Tax
Mrs Smith: Mr Wethered 1 0 0
Mr Thomas Robinson …………… 1 16 0

1791 25 July Will of Sarah Smith of Great marlow widow
Executors, James Crease of Great Marlow Maltster and Joseph Plumridge of Great Marlow brewer

1792 Rate Book
Mr George Wethered for house & malthouse £19/19 £0 9s 9d
House & Malthouse in High Street £11 £0 5s 6d

1794 Directory Wethered, George, maltster

1795 17 June Will of Sarah Smith of Great marlow widow proved PCC

1795 Land Tax
Late Mrs Smith: Geo Wethered 1 0 0
Mr Thos Robinson: Geo Wethered 1 16 0

1797 Rate Book
Mr George Wethered house & malthouse £19/19 £0 9s 9d
House late Mr Smith’s £4 £0 2s 0d
House & Malthouse in High Street £11 £0 5s 6d

1799 Rate Book
Mr George Wethered for malthouse & new malthouse £16 £0 8s 0d
House late in Mrs Smith’s occupation £4 £0 2s 0d
For malthouse & premises adj £11 £0 5s 6d
Malthouse in Duck Lane £11 £0 5s 6d
Nb house not occupied

1800 Land Tax
Mr Thos Robinson: Mr Badger £9 £1 16 0

1800 Rate Book
Mr William Badger house & malthouse £20 £0 10s 0d

1802 Rate Book
William Badger for house & malthouse £2 8 0

1807 Rate Book
John Gibbons for house & malthouse £1 4 0

1810 Land Tax
Mrs Robinson: John Gibbons £9 £1 16 0

1823 2 Sept Will of Thomas Gibbons of Great Marlow gent
Son Richard Gibbons
All that messuage or tenement with the yard garden outbuildings warehouse & appurts thereunto belonging situate and being in St Peter Street Great Marlow aforesaid now in his own occupation
And also all those five several messuages cottages or tenements with the yards gardens outbuildings and appurts thereunto severally belonging situate and being in St Peter Street in Great Marlow aforesaid now in the respective occupations of John Sparks James Downer William Weymall Thomas Gardener and Richard Beath
And also all that piece or parcel of ground with the newly erected messuage or tenement counting house outbuildings and warehouse thereon standing or being or thereto adjoining with all and singular yards gardens premises rights members and appurts thereunto belonging or therewith used occupied or enjoyed situate and being in the parish of Great Marlow aforesaid near to Marlow Bridge and commonly called or known by the name of Limbrocke

Executors sons & dau Thomas, Richard & Elizabeth Gibbons
Proved PCC 17 July 1824

1823 Directory
Gibbons, Richard ropemaker St Peters Street

1830 Directory Rope manufacturers
Gibbons, Richard St Peters Street

1841 Schedule to 1861 deed to Limbrook includes mortgages by Richard Gibbons of Great Marlow Brewer 1841-

1842 Directory
Maltsters
Gibbons, Richard St Peter Street
Misc
Gibbons, Richard brewer & ropemaker St Peter Street

1848 Directory
Gibbons, Richard brewer maltster & rope manufacturer St Peter Street

1851 Census St Peter Street
Richard Gibbons brewer 5 men
Ann Gibbons 62
Edward Frederick Gibbons 27 brewers assistant
Charles Edmund 25 brewers assistant
Alfred Gibbons 22 Wine Merchant

1851 Church Rate Book
Owner: Gibbons; Occ: Richard Gibbons
House garden malthouse brewery yard stables store
rooms St Peters Street £34 17s
Store Rooms St Peters Street £7 4s 6d
Owner: Exec late S Barnes: Occ: Richard Gibbons
Malthouse St Peters Street £12 15s

1861 Census St Peters Street
Edward Frederick Gibbons 37 brewer employing 4 men

1864 Directory
Gibbons, Charles Edmund brewer St Peters Street

1866 Rate Book PR 140/20/1
680 Gibbons, Chas E. house, buildings,
storerooms, brewery, yard, land £49 12 0

1871 Census St Peters Street
William Betts head 41 boarding house keeper
Charles E Gibbons boarder 43 brewer

1872 Public Houses
Brewery Tap 1868 Charles Edward Gibbons Messrs Gregory, Great Marlow

1875 By 1875, the malthouse of R Gibbons in St Peters Street had been converted into a chair factory

1877 Directory
Buckingham Chair Co Ltd. (Reuben Nereus Smith managing director) St Peter’s Street
Smith, Reuben Nereus Assistant Overseer Marlow Fields

1881 Census St Peters Street
Richard Pearce 40 chair polisher (cabinet maker)

Additional information