There are over 250 parishes in the county, here they have been divided into five groups based on modern boundaries. Before 1974 all records are defined by the historic county boundaries which included the town of Milton Keynes and followed the Thames in the south of the county.

Material is being transferred into this section and the old format retired.

Buckingham

Introduction

Church: St Peter and St Paul

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 5006

Easting & Northing: 469233

Grid Ref SP690330 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Buckingham PARISH St Peter and St Paul
Bochingeham NAMES name for Buckingham in Domesday Book in 1086
Boreton NAMES name for Buerton in 1535 and 1755
Buckyngham NAMES name for Buckingham in 1508
Buorton NAMES name for Bourton in 1517
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Eberneezer Chapel, Maids Moreton Road. First Mentioned: 1842
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Moreton Road. First Mentioned: 1842. later Primitive Methodist now Salvation Army
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Union Chapel, Church Street. First Mentioned: 1792
Old Meeting House NON-CONFORMIST Well Street. First Mentioned: 1726
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Meeting House. First Mentioned: 1654. Built 1786 closed 1854
Bourton PLACE within the parish
Bourton Brake PLACE within the parish
Bourtonhold PLACE within the parish
Lenborough PLACE within the parish
Prebend End PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 2605
1811 2987
1821 3465
1831 3610
1841 4054
1851 4020
1861 3849
1871 3703
1881 3585
1891 3364
1901 3152
1911 3282
1921 3060
1931 3083
1941 N/A
1951 3942
1961 4379
1971 5076
1981 6066
1991 9574

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Buckingham   St Peter & St Paul   Baptisms   1561   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Buckingham   St Peter & St Paul   Marriages   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Buckingham   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1558   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 NORTH SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 WHITE JONES FRENCH NORTH
3 SMITH HOLT GILES JONES
4 CLARKE NORTH NORTH HARRIS
5 HARRIS HARRIS JONES WHITE
6 WISEMAN CLARKE HARRIS GILES
7 ROBINSON WATTS KING KING
8 COOPER WARR WHITE FRENCH
9 CARTER KING WATTS WATTS
10 HILL CLARK HOLLAND CLARKE

 

Description

Description and notes on the town of Buckingham

From J.J. Sheahan:

Buckingham is a parliamentary and corporate borough, a market town, head of a hundred, archdeaconry, rural deanery, parish and poor law union. It gives its name to the county and is situated 37 miles N.W. from London, 17 miles N.W. from Aylesbury, 8 miles E by S from Brackley, and 24 miles N.E. from Oxford. The parish, including several hamlets contains 4777 acres; and its population now (in 1861) is 3,847 souls, viz:- 1,832 males and 2,015 females. The town and parish comprise a municipal borough. The rateable value of the town and parish is £13,648. The parish is divided into six districts, separately rated.

On Monday evening, March 15 1725, a most calamitous fire occurred in Buckingham, by which above 130 dwellings, besides out-houses, barns etc., were consumed, and as many families reduced to great distress, or involved in utter ruin. The loss was computed at £40,000. The fire broke out in a yard in Castle Street, and destroyed nearly the whole of that street, as well as the houses round the bottom of Church Hill, towards the Tingewick Bridge, and those on the Market Hill, on the opposite side as far as the Dolphin Inn (which was on fire but not burnt) and a great part of West Street, Boutonhold, and Well Street. A large sum of money was raised for the relief of the sufferers, but, as Mr. Roundell observes, " it is doubtful whether the town ever recovered from the loss then experienced; cottages were erected where good houses formerly stood, and no adequate compensation could be made to persons in trade for the vast losses they sustained, by the destruction of their shops and warehouses." Mr. Roundell also tells us that to this fire " we owe the erection of the high brick houses in North End, known as The Buildings, which were constructed on the waste, by Lord Cobham, for the poor who had lost their cottages. "

Notes

Is the county-town; it is situated in a valley, on a dry gravelly soil, surrounded on all sides, except the North by the Ouze, over which it has three stone bridges. It is distant 57 miles North West of London, and is bounded on the West by Tingwick and Ratclifte, North by Moreton, North East by Thornborough, East by Padbury, and South by Hillesden and- Preston. It contains about 3800 acres, whereof 1600 are reputed to be in Lemborough Endship, 500 in Gawcott, 1200 Bourton and 500 in the borough part of the town; it is assessed to the land tax at 613l 5d. The number of families in the whole parish is supposed to be 540 and the vicarage is about the value of 100l, per annum.

It derives its name from buc, an hart or deer, and is a town of great antiquity; for according to Browne Willis, in the 44th year after Christ, Aulus Plautius, the Roman general, under the Emperor Claudius, surprised the Britons on the banks of the Ouze, at or near Buckingham; and, on the first spreading of Christianity in the Saxon times it became remarkable for the sepulchre of St. Rumald, the son of a king, and canonized by superstitious zeal.

In the reign King Edward III. it was summoned to send members to parliament, but does not appear to have done so till the 36th of Henry VIII. though from that of Edward VI it has sent two members regularly; its present members are, Sir Alexander Hood K.B. and Colonel George Nugent


Queen Mary incorporated it, by the name of a bailiff and twelve burgesses.

Charles II in 1684 granted it a new charter, changing the magistrates into a mayor and two aldermen, but the old charter was restored four years after, and the magistrates are still a bailiff and burgesses.

The whole business of the county was formerly transacted at Aylesbury, but, by an act of parliament, the summer assizes are removed to Buckingham. The sessions for the town and parish are held here every half year; and the corporation, consisting of a high bailiff, (who is always a burgess, and elected by a majority of housekeepers, annually, on the first of May,) high steward, recorder, twelve principle burgesses, town-clerk, and mace-bearer, hold a court here once every three weeks for the recovery of small debts.


Here is a free school, founded by Isabel Denton; and a gaol, in the form of a castle, for the town and parish only, as al1 prisoners, except for such crimes as are committed in the parish, are sent to the county gaol, which is at Aylesbury

A castle was built by the Saxon King Edward the elder, on a hill which divides which divides the town in the middle, but there are now no traces of it left. The spire of the church reckoned one of the tallest in England, was blown-down in 1698, by a tempest and was never rebuilt; the tower itself fell March 26 1776, since which the church yard remains a burial-place with a chapel only, and a new church has been erected on the hill where the castle formerly stood; it is a plain neat building with a spire and the inside finished in an elegant stile. The altar-piece, representing the transfiguration of Christ, is taken from the celebrated picture of Raphael, and was given to the church by the present Marquis of Buckingham whose uncle, the late Earl Temple, contributed very largely to rebuild it ; the inhabitants raising the remainder among themselves. The noble Earl's arms and crest are in stone over the East and West doors; his crest is also erected on the new town-hall as a fane.


This town was of note enough in the time of Edward III. to have one of the staples for wool fixed here; when that great prince, with a discernment beyond the genius of the age in which he lived laid the foundation of that trade, which has since been carried to an amazing extent, by prohibiting the exportation of unmanufactured wool, There still remains a house, known by the name of the Wool-hall. The principal manufacture of the town and neighbourhood at present is bone-lace; and there are several corn and paper-mills erected on the Ouze, in and near the town. By an act passed in the reign of Henry VII the weights and measures of the county are kept in the sessions-house here.


It has a market on Saturday; and -seven fairs annually, viz. Monday fortnight after Old Twelfth-day, March 7, (if leap-year March 6,) May 6, Thursday in the Whitsun-week, July 10, Sept. 4, Oct 4, and Nov 8

On March 25, 1725 a melancholy fire happened here, by which 138 families lost nearly 33,000l

The present magistrates are, Richard Woodward, Gent. High-Bailiff; Philip Box, and James Bradford, Esqrs. Justices. Banker, Philip Box, Esq. The bills are payable on demand at Vere, Lucadou Troughton, Lucadou, and Smart's, No. 77, Lombard-Street, London. The bank opens at 9 o'clock in the morning, and shuts at 6 in the evening.

The post-office opens at 8 o'clock in the morning, and shuts at 6 in evening, The mail-coach till lately came through Buckingham to Banbury; but, the proprietors found it did not answer; so that the bags are now carried to and from Stony-Stratford, where the postman meets the Liverpool mail-coach.

The principal inns in Buckingham are, the Cobham Arms, the White-Hart, and the Swan.
,
A coach sets out from the Cobham-Arms inn every morning, except Sunday, at 8 o'clock, and arrives at the Bell and Crown, Holborn, London, every evening, at 6; from whence it sets out every morning at 6, and arrives at Buckingham at four in the afternoon. Fare 16s.-Calls, going in and coming out of London, at Doery's, Green Man and Still, Oxford-Street; and is continued on to Banbury. A coach from Birmingham, calls at the Swan every day, except Sunday, on its way to the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, London.
E. Eagles's stage-waggon sets out every Wednesday and Saturday, at one in the afternoon, and arrives at the George, Snow-hill, London, every Friday and Monday mornings; from whence it returns every Saturday morning at 6, and Tuesday morning at 3, o'clock; calls, going in and coming out of London, at Doery's, the Green Man and Still, Oxford-Street.
M
T Stuckberys Stage-waggon sets out every Wednesday and Saturday, at one in the afternoon, and arrives at the Oxford Arms, Warwick -Lane, London, every Friday and Monday mornings: from whence it returns every Saturday morning at 6, and Tuesday morning at 3, o'clock; calls, going in and coming out of London, at Moore's, Green Man and Still, Oxford Street.

E. Eagles's Brackley waggon passes through this town to and from London twice every week.

Buckingham is distant from Oxford 34. miles, Northampton, 21, Bedford, 30, Newport-Pagnel 15, Stony-Stratford 8, Towcester 12, Winslow 7. Aylesbury, 17, Bicester 12, Brackley 7, and 57 from London.

The principle villages and seats of the nobility and gentry in the neighbourhood are as follows:- Hillesden House 2miles, the seat of Miss Manners; Thornton Hall 2 miles, the seat of Thomas Sheppard Esq Wicker-park 4 miles, the seat of Mrs Prowse Shalstone 4 miles, the seat of Rev Mr Puresoy and Lillingstone Dagnell 4 miles, the seat of Richard Dagnell Esq Maids Moreton 1 mile, Forcott 2. Gawcott,1, Lenborough 1, Bourton 1, Thornborough 2, Leckhamstead 3, Ratcliffe cum Chackmore 1, Tingewick 3, Barton 4, Preston 4, Hillesden 2, Padbury 3, Adstock 4 and Addington 5.
We shall conclude with a description of Stowe, the beautiful house and gardens of the Marquis of Buckingham, about 3 miles from the town. The prodigiously long façade to the garden is a complete piece of new architecture by Mr Wyatt, who first distinguished himself by planning the Pantheon in Oxford Street, lately burnt down, The house is large, and extends in one line of front 900 feet; but great part of the house has been pulled down, and is rebuilt upon a very beautiful and magnificent plan. The many beautiful paintings, the works of the most capital artist, which are placed in different parts of the house are truly worthy the inspection of every curious traveller; but, the ornamental grounds are more peculiar than the house itself. They were many years the admiration of all that viewed them, not only for their real beauty,

but the scarcity of other improvements of the same kind in the kingdom. They were sketched at first quite in the old stile of broad straight gravel walks and avenues of trees, with regular waters; but many of these circumstances are much changed, and the grounds modernized as much as they would admit. We shall give a few observations which we made, in the order we viewed this beautiful scene:-From the temple of Bacchus there is a pleasing view down on the water in the vale, the temple of Venus on its banks, with some wood behind it; but, the effect would be better were it quite backed with the dark shade of a thick wood. Passing a cave, or rather a root-house, dedicated to St. Austin, the walks lead to the pavilions at the park-gate, from which the water is seen differently winding, in a very natural taste, at the bottom of several pastures; it is here as just an imitation of a real stream as can any where be seen. From Queen Caroline's pillar, the wood and water appear to advantage, and the portico of one of the pavilions, on the South fide of the gardens, is caught among the woods in a most agreeable manner. Moving down to the water, a common bench commands a view of a building that terminates the water, which is here large; but, observe a small grass lawn Scattered with trees, on the opposite banks, which breaks from the water into the wood; it is extremely picturesque, and the bell PW of this view. Advancing to the temple of Venus, the landscape is very fine j the water fills the valley, (though rather too regular in the bend,) and the oppose hill is well spread with thick wood. The rotunda is beautifully placed on a Point of ground, with a projecting wood behind it; and to the left, the temple of Bacchus appears quite embosomed in a thick grove. From the shepherd's cave, the view of the rotunda is extremely picturesque: from hence the path winds by the water; but, the terminations of it are ornamented with statues, and the regularity of the cascades are in a very different stile from the rotunda, and at once presents a view of the most cultivated taste. From the first pavilion. The view of the lakes is very pleasing; it gives a bend, which forms a promontory of a beautiful verdure scattered with trees, between the bodies of which you command the water. Gardening seldom offers a more beautiful object, nor can it well be employed without success. The extreme beauty of this part of the view wil1 draw off your attention from the regular lawn that leads up to the house From the temple of Friendship, the view of that of Ancient Virtue in a thick wood is extremely fine. The Palladian bridge is taken from that at Wilton and the water winds through natural meadows in a just taste. From thence, as you mount the hill, the view to the left is extremely fine; the water winds through the valley; one of the pavilions on the banks is very prettily scattered with wood. From the bench at the top of the hill, the view is varied; here you view the Corinthian Arch in an excellent situation; a proof, that ornamental buildings may sometimes be nearly distinct from wood, though the connection between them is seldom broken without damaging the beauty of a view. From the front of the Gothic temple, the views are admirably rich; on one side the portico of the temple of Concord is beautifully seen in the wood: on the other, the ground has a varied slope into the valley, where the water winds in a very pleasing manner; the pavilion is beautifully situated on its bank; in front, a dark wood bounds the scene- Passing Lord Cobham's pillar, from whence is a view through a wood of the temple of Concord, you come by winding walks to the Banqueting Room, from whence is a fine and varied prospect here the Corinthian Arch appears to advantage. From hence you are conducted winding, to the temple of Concord and Victory, and, in the way, pass a most beautiful, hollow, winding lawn; the brows of a11 the surrounding slopes are finely spread with wood, thick in some places; and in others scattered, so as to open for the eye to follow the bends of the lawn; which is everywhere different. The temple is excellently situated on the brow of one of the hills, and is a very fine building; it is an oblong, totally surrounded by a colonnade of well-proportioned pillars, and the architecture is light and pleasant. In it is a room 42 by 25,

ornamented with a statue of Liberty, and several medallions in the walls, some of which are extremely well executed, though the performance of a self-taught artist, once a poor boy in Lord Temple's stables. The walk leads next to a sequestered winding vale, finely surrounded with wood ; and a small water takes its course through it, broken by woody islands, and a various obscured shore. At the head is a grotto of shells, &c. which look down on the water in a pleasing manner, and must be particularly beautiful when the woods and water are illuminated, which they are when the Marquis of Buckingham sups in it.-

Here is a statue of Venus rising from the bath; a pleasing figure, and the attitudes naturally taken, though not well imagined for exhibiting the person to advantage. The grove, on which the grotto looks, leads you to that part of the garden called the Elysian Fields, which are beautiful Waves of close-shaven grass, breaking among woods, and scattered with single trees; bounded on one side by thick groves, and shelving on the other down to the water, which winds in a very happy manner, and commanding from several spots various landscapes of the distant parts of the garden. From the temple of Ancient Virtue, you look down on a very beautiful winding hollow lawn, scattered with single trees in the happiest manner, between the trunks of which the water breaks to the eye in a stile admirably picturesque. Near to this temple, in a thicket, is the well-known satire, the temple of Modern Virtue in ruin. The ground continues extremely various and beautiful, till you come to the Princess Amelia's

arch, from which you at once break upon a scene truly enchanting, being more like a rich picturesque composition than the effect of an artful management of ground and buildings. The lawn from the arch falls in various waves to the water, at the bottom of the vale; it is scattered with trees, whose spreading tops unite, and leave the eye an irregular command among their stems of a double wave of the lake. The smooth green of the lawn, obscured in some places by the shade of the trees, in others illumined by the sun, forms an object as beautiful as can be imagined; nor can any thing be more picturesque than the water appearing through the fore mound of the scene, thus canopy with trees.

A break in the grove presents a complete picture above these beautiful varieties of wood and water: the Palladian bridge is backed by rising ground scattered with wood, and at the top of that a castle. The objects of the whole scene, though various, and some distant are most happily united to form a complete view, equally magnificent and pleasant: the arch is light and well designed building. Upon the whole, these gardens have much to please the spectator; the new parts have a happy variety of ground; much of the wood is well grown and fine; consequently the shade where wanted, is quite dark and gloomy, to a beautiful degree. The water, though not perfectly cured of its original stiffness, winds at the bottom of fine falling vallies, and its shores are well spread with wood ; an advantage to great, that an instance is not to be produced of a lake or river that is beautiful without an intimate connection with wood. The buildings are very numerous, and most of them are in a good state

Education

Buckingham Borough and Parish,
including the Hamlets of Bourton, Bourtonhold, Lenborough, Prebend-end Precinct, and the Chapelry of Gawcott (Pop. 3,610.)

Four Daily Schools; two whereof are endowed, and respectively contain 45 and 36 males:

The first with £15 per annum, for which 25 are educated;

The second, with a small stipend paid from the Exchequer, for the education of six children, the rest are paid for by their parents

In another, 12 males

And in the other (commenced 1832) 4 males and 27 females, are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Day and Boarding School, in which 53 females are educated at the expense of
their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School (commenced 1819), attended by 80 males daily, and 10 in addition, together with 50 females on Sundays, supported by voluntary contributions; the master is paid £50Z. and the mistress £4 per annum.

Three Sunday Schools; one consists of 44 males and 96 females, appertaining to Independents; another, 25 males and 86 females to Wesleyan Methodists; the other (of all denominations) 36 males and 54 females. The children in these Schools are all gratuitously instructed, and a lending Library is attached to the last mentioned.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Buckland

Introduction

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1555

Easting & Northing: 488212

Grid Ref SP880120 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Buckland PARISH All Saints
Bocheland NAMES name for Buckland in Domesday Book in 1086
Lealands NAMES name for Layland's in 1825
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Buckland Common. First Mentioned: 1860
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1836. Now a house
Buckland Common PLACE within the parish
North Hill Wood PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 288
1811 331
1821 496
1831 510
1841 537
1851 662
1861 732
1871 820
1881 863
1891 847
1901 730
1911 689
1921 722
1931 673
1941 N/A
1951 507
1961 464
1971 491
1981 514
1991 550

There was no census in 1941.

records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Buckland   All Saints   Baptisms   1605   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Buckland   All Saints   Marriages   1609   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Buckland   All Saints   Burials   1605   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BRANDON HORWOOD BRACKLEY BRACKLEY
2 LAKE RANCE BROWN HORWOOD
3 HORWOOD WRIGHT SMITH BROWN
4 KINGHAM LAKE HORWOOD SMITH
5 WESTON THORN GREEN GREEN
6 WRIGHT FOUNTAIN GATES RANCE
7 WOSTER WELLS BISHOP GATES
8 NORWOOD NORWOOD MORRIS THORNE
9 WOSETER BRACKLEY BONE MORRIS
10 FIELD BRANDON LOVEGROVE BISHOP

 

Description

Description of Buckland from Sheahan, 1861

This parish 1,544 acres of land, and 734 inhabitants, is of very singular shape, being about seven miles in length, and in the broadest part not exceeding half a mile, but in the narrowest, towards the northern extremity, scarcely one furlong. Its southern extremity rises into lofty irregular eminences terminating with the basis of the Chiltern Hills, near Cholesbury Church. The soil is chiefly a clayey loam, which in the low grounds is mixed with veins of gravel. Abundance of chalk, in strata of great thickness is found in the hills. The higher grounds abound with beech-woods, hazel, ash and holly. Under an Act passed in 1842, all the remaining unenclosed land in the parish was enclosed, excepting about fifty acres belonging to the late J.C.Neild, Esq. The Aylesbury and Wendover branch of the Grand Junction Canal intersects this parish in two places.

The village is small and compact, and contains some good farm houses. It is situated 3 miles W.N.W. from Tring, and 4.5 miles E.S.E. from Aylesbury, on the road between those places.

The Church, (All Saints), is an ancient Gothic structure, consisting of a nave, with a north aisle and south porch, a chancel, and a embattled tower at the west end.The nave and aisle are covered with lead; the porch and chancel are gable-roofed and tiled. There are three bells in the tower.

The Wesleyan Chapel, a neat building of red brick, near the centre of the village, was erected in 1836.

Buckland Common (now enclosed), is a district three miles distant from the village, containing a number of scattered houses, some of which are old; one house in particular, built of wood and brick, and now divided into tenements, appears to have once been of the better class of country residences. On a part of the " common " - a lonely spot - are the remains of a pottery, where the common brown ware was formerly made.

Education

Buckland Parish (Pop. 510)

No School in the parish; the children attend the Schools at Aston-Clinton.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.}

 

Charndon

Introduction

Church:

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1911

Easting & Northing: 467224

Grid Ref SP670240 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Charndon PARISH  
Chaundon NAMES name for Charndon in 1761 and 1766
Credendone NAMES name for Charndon in Domesday Book in 1086

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 146
1811 153
1821 165
1831 160
1841 190
1851 204
1861 170
1871 165
1881 150
1891 131
1901 148
1911 240
1921 304
1931 313
1941 N/A
1951 442
1961 381
1971 314
1981 245
1991 273

There was no census in 1941.

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BAKER LAMBURNE HUGHES LAMBURNE
2 LAMBURNE HITCHCOCK MIDDLETON HUGHES
3 KINGE WIGG HARPER HITCHCOCK
4 BOWDEN SYMONS MILLS BAKER
5 SHIPTON BOWDEN STEVENS WIGG
6 LAMBURN BAKER LAMBURN BOWDEN
7 HUGHES SYMONDS MERRY MIDDLETON
8 ASBURN SPIERS LAMBOURN SYMONS
9 WIGG BISHOP WRIGHT HARPER
10 ENDS LAMBOURN WILLIS SYMONDS

Description

Description on Charndon as a hamlet in J.J. Sheahan 1861.

Charndon Hamlet. - Charndon is a large hamlet consisting of several good farm-houses, and a number of cottages, 2 mile N.E. of Twyford. Area, 1880 acres, rateable value of £1445. Population of 170. The principle landowners are the Baroness Wenman, Mr J.E. Kinch, Mrs Lamborn, Mr E. Jonson, Sir Harry Verney, Bart., and the executors of the late A. Wing Esq. From Windmill Hill is a remarkably beautiful and extensive prospect.

Chearsley

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 943

Easting & Northing: 471210

Grid Ref SP710100 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Chearsley PARISH St Nicholas
Cerdeslai NAMES name for Chearsley in Domesday Book in 1086
Charesley NAMES name for Chearsley in 1526
General Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1822. Rebuilt 1854

 

Places

Links

 

Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Stock Well, Chearsley Stock Well, Chearsley
Victoria County History Victoria County History
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Search The National Archives for Chearsley Search The National Archives for Chearsley

Photographs

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 214
1811 217
1821 263
1831 337
1841 308
1851 292
1861 287
1871 311
1881 235
1891 242
1901 212
1911 276
1921 260
1931 240
1941 N/A
1951 271
1961 309
1971 412
1981 433
1991 486

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1574   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Marriages   1571   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Chearsley   St Nicholas   Burials   1576   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BRIGHTWELL BADRICK WALKER WALKER
2 OLIVER GUNTRIP BADRICK BADRICK
3 WHEELER WILSON SMITH WILSON
4 WOODBRIDGE BETTS WILSON SMITH
5 PARKER MOSS WHITE WHITE
6 WILLSON OLIVER NEAREY GUNTRIP
7 BIGG WALKER RAY WOOD
8 WINTER WILLSON HORTON RAY
9 FLOID BURT WOOD OLIVER
10 BIGGE REYNOLDS TOMBS NEAREY

 

Description

Chearsley is a small village of less than 500 inhabitants. The unknowing traveller can easily miss its charms as very little of the village is on view from the main road. The detour down the side of the hill, with the winding, hollow lanes, is worth taking.

The village probably developed from a collection of small scattered farmsteads which, by the 9th century, was known as 'Ceored's leah'. By the time of the Domesday survey in 1086, there may have been about 50 inhabitants. Later, the village developed on the north and east side of the church, and the remains of a medieval moat can be seen in the field between the church and the river Thame.

Many of the cottages are thatched, and if a walk is taken down School Lane, there is an old terrace of cottages, which used to house the lace makers of yesteryear. If the electricity wires are ignored, one can almost see the ladies, with their straw pillows and bobbins, sitting outside the cottages, making their beautiful Buckinghamshire lace patterns. This is also the spot where the ratcatcher used to frighten the girls coming out of school! He would save the little white mice he had caught and place them under his hat. On seeing the schoolgirls, he would raise the hat in true gentlemanly fashion, and the mice would cascade to the ground!

In the Conservation area, Watts Green is particularly picturesque, with its mixture of thatched, timber and witchert dwellings. This was once the 'tradesmen's' section of the village, with a shop, ale-house, cobbler's shop and nail-makers shed in close proximity to each other, around the green. The nail-maker's shed can still be seen in the garden of 'Needlemakers' cottage, but, sadly, the matching cobbler's shed on the other side of the lane was destroyed.
At the bottom of the hill, stands the 12th/13th century church.  This little building with its simple white interior, is much loved by all who visit.
Near the church, is a spring which trickles into a pond, known as Stockwell. It is suspected that this is the holy well to which pilgrims made homage in previous centuries. Chearsley has many springs and often water can be heard running through the road drains in the driest of weather. Stockwell was still running in the famous drought of 1976.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Chearsley from Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Chearsley is 1,130 acres, of the rateable value of £1,357. Population, about 290. The soil is a deep clay, with strata of limestone, sand, rubble, gravel.

The village, which is small, retired, and ancient, is situated at the foot and on the slope of an irregular hill near the course of the river Thame, 4 miles N.N.E. from Thame, and 7 miles S.W. from Aylesbury. The river divides the parish on the south side from that of Haddenham.

Chearsley was originally a chapelry to Crendon, and was included by Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham, in his endowment of Notley Abbey. The Church was made parochial, with rights of sepulture by the Bishop of Lincoln in 1458.

Education

Chearsley Parish (Pop. 337)

One Daily School, containing 30 children of both sexes who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School, in which about 60 receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


 

Cheddington

Introduction

Church: St Giles

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 1429

Easting & Northing: 492217

Grid Ref SP920170 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cheddington PARISH St Giles
Cetedene NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Cetedone NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Cetendone NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Chedingden NAMES name for Cheddington in 1511
Chedyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535, 1545
Chedynton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535
Chetington NAMES name for Cheddington in 1526
Chiddyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1537
Shedyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1839. By 1860 combined with Baptists
Ivinghoe (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Populations

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 273
1811 301
1821 341
1831 375
1841 439
1851 508
1861 628
1871 745
1881 744
1891 654
1901 580
1911 547
1921 539
1931 533
1941 N/A
1951 520
1961 655
1971 1050
1981 1450
1991 1692

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cheddington   St Giles   Baptisms   1539   1922   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cheddington   St Giles   Marriages   1556   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cheddington   St Giles   Burials   1556   1923   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Schools

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1863     1880         Logbook
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1873     1912         Logbook
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1897     1924         Logbook
    Cheddington     Evening     Cheddington     1900     1931         Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available     Punishment     Cheddington     1923     1933     Yes     Punishment Book
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1924     1950         Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1924     1945         Minute Book
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1862     1903         H
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1860     1895     Yes     Admissions Register
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1874     1904         H
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1921     1926         E
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1874     1894         E
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1912     1915     Yes     Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available         Cheddington     1887     1950     Yes     Admissions Register

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HOWES NEWENS STEVENS STEVENS
2 FOUNTAYNE BATES ARCHER NEWENS
3 SEARE GLENISTER SEABROOK SEABROOK
4 SEABROOKE JENKINS TOMPKINS CUTLER
5 HOWSE KIMPTON MILLINS ARCHER
6 STEVENS KYMPTON CUTLER TOMPKINS
7 KIMPTON STEVENS HEDGES MILLINS
8 EVANS SEABROOKE CHANDLER TOOLEY
9 PARTRIDGE SEARE EDWARDS SMITH
10 PITKIN TOOLEY GREEN HEDGES

 

Description

Cheddington of the early 1920s was a very different village from that of today. Then it was a very rural community comprised of not more than 200 houses. The largest of these were the Rectory, Manor House, White House and the farms. There were very few detached houses and the rest were terraced cottages. The 3 pubs at present in the village were supplemented by The Old Inn where beer only was sold.

The village then boasted 2 general shops which stocked everything from peanuts to glass lamp shades (for the oil lamps then used), a bakery with daily deliveries, butcher, cobbler, drapers, post office, newspapers, coal merchant, forge and 2 farmers delivering milk, builders and 2 undertakers. In addition to grocers from Tring and Leighton Buzzard who delivered orders and butchers from Long Marston and Ivinghoe, there was also a fishman and an ice cream seller from Wing.

The local men were mostly employed on the farms, with local builders, on the nearby Rosebery estate or on the railway. Cheddington was and still is the only village on the main Euston line. It is believed we had this honour because of the convenience for taking Lord Rosebery's racing horses to Newmarket or wherever they were running. The railway employed a staff of about 20 on the station alone. Besides plate layers, there was even a gasometer to supply gas for lighting the station and the station master's house. There w"as also a branch line to Aylesbury. The drivers knew all the passengers and checked we were all there every morning, if not they looked out for us rushing up late and would stop the train and hoist us up to the carriage. The train was liable to delays when cattle strayed on the line and had to be driven off.

The women in Cheddington went to work in the factories at Apsley and Berkhamsted, and those at home often did plaiting for the famous Luton straw hats, did dressmaking or made the Bucks lace.

Practically every house had a garden or allotment and very few people ever bought vegetables. But above all Cheddington produced plums. Nearly all the new estates are built on old orchards. Greengages, Victorias, damsons, Pond's Seedlings, Early Rivers, but above all prune damsons which were used in plum and apple jam and for dyes. They are not a dessert variety and very few remain except in gardens. They were sent to Covent Garden and Spitalfields market for sale, and in a good year one ton a day would be packed in the round skips sent by the fruit firms and collected daily by Tommy Lambourne on the coal cart and sent to London for sale along with the churns of milk the farmers sent to the London dairies.

Cheddington became famous in 1962 because of the Great Train Robbery which happened at a railway bridge just outside the village. A record sum of two and a half million pounds in used bank notes were taken and at the trial of the robbers record sentences of 30 years in prison were inflicted by the Assize Judge at Aylesbury.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

Local words
Hommocks along: walks in heavy boots with lumps of mud attached
Clapered: very dirty, muddy
Thragged: loaded
Sawny or gallus: stupid
Ceach: scoop of water
Sotchel along: walk along dragging the feet
Spraggle about: walk awkwardly
Lichup: lazy or walk slowly
Pottle measure: round measure for small apples, onions

Hare coursing used to take place regularly along the Mentmore road and also pigeon and rook shooting.

Before a hearse came into common use, coffins ere placed on a wooden bier and pulled along the Church Path to the church. The bier was kept in a shed near the Church Lane allotments, along with a bath chair for any parishioners in need of one.

Farmers used to go round the Lynces at night with lights and nets to throw over the bushes to trap the sparrows that did so much damage to crops. They eere paid so much for every sparrow caught and had annual Sparrow Club Dinner at Tring.

Dora McGuire, Cheddington


Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Description of Cheddington from Sheahan, 1861

This parish, including part of the hamlet of Seabrook (the remainder being in Ivinghoe), contains 1,398 acres and 628 persons. The soil is chiefly clay and loam. The rateable value is £ 4,616. The North-Eastern Railway intersects the parish, occupying 33 acres of it; and about from the village is Cheddington Station. of that line, where the Aylesbury branch commences. The Grand Junction Canal occupies about six acres of the land.

The village is small, and stands 7 miles N.W. by W. from Aylesbury, 5 S. from Leighton Buzzard, 4 N from Tring, and 2 miles N.W. from Ivinghoe.

Formerly Cheddington was not an entire parish, but had parts of the parishes of Cublington, Eddlesborough, Ivinghoe, and Marsworth, intermixed with it.

Education

Cheddington Parish (Pop. 375)

One Daily School, in which are 6 males.

One Sunday School, with 45 children of both sexes; supported by voluntary contributions, and commenced since 1818.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Chetwode

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas and St Mary

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1171

Easting & Northing: 464229

Grid Ref SP640290 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Chetwode PARISH St Nicholas and St Mary
Ceteode NAMES name for Chetwode in Domesday Book in 1086
Chickwood NAMES name for Chetwode in 1615
Chitwood NAMES name for Chetwode in 1535
Sidnums PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 123
1811 98
1821 131
1831 149
1841 197
1851 217
1861 177
1871 173
1881 155
1891 170
1901 157
1911 142
1921 124
1931 128
1941 N/A
1951 107
1961 94
1971 71
1981 84
1991 89

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chetwode   St Nicholas & St Mary   Baptisms   1582   1813   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chetwode   St Nicholas & St Mary   Marriages   1584   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chetwode   St Nicholas & St Mary   Burials   1583   1813   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WARRE GRANTHAM CHAMBERS CHAMBERS
2 KING SMITH HORWOOD SMITH
3 ROBINS CLARK WISE GRANTHAM
4 FINCH KING JAMES KING
5 BULLOCK FINCH HIRONS CLARK
6 RISLEY ROBERTS STEVENS HORWOOD
7 BULLOCKE CUBBIDGE CHERRY WISE
8 SMITH THORNTON ARCHER HIRONS
9 BUNCE MERRY CLARK FINCH
10 BRASSETT ADAMS GRANTHAM JAMES

 

Description

Description of Chetwode from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of the parish of Chetwode is 1,200 acres; population, 177 souls; rateable value, £1,327. The soil is a stiff clay. The place is supposed to have derived its name from the Saxon word Chit a cottage, and the wood in which the few cottages in the parish formerly lay scattered - being, in fact, part of the old forest called Rockwood. Indeed the farm and other houses are now so scattered that, correctly speaking, there is no village. Chetwode is distant about 5 miles S.W. of Buckingham. A feeder of the Ouse passes through the parish, and separates it and the county from Oxfordshire.

 

 

Education

Chetwood Parish (Pop. 149)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Chilton

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 2069

Easting & Northing: 468211

Grid Ref SP680110 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Chilton PARISH St Mary
Chiltone NAMES name for Chilton in the Domesday Book in 1086
Eastoundon NAMES name for Easington in 1627
Harnage NAMES name for Hornage in 1541
Hesintone NAMES name for Easington in Domesday Book in 1086
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1847
Cannoncourt (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Chilton Grove PLACE within the parish
Chiltonpark Farm PLACE within the parish
Easington PLACE within the parish
Hornage PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 316
1811 338
1821 379
1831 314
1841 364
1851 398
1861 364
1871 336
1881 301
1891 287
1901 285
1911 280
1921 270
1931 293
1941 N/A
1951 326
1961 362
1971 320
1981 317
1991 316

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chilton cum Easington   St Mary   Baptisms   1600   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chilton cum Easington   St Mary   Marriages   1602   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chilton cum Easington   St Mary   Burials   1600   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SANDERS SAUNDERS EDWARDS SAUNDERS
2 CHILTON SANDERS SAUNDERS EDWARDS
3 CASTLE HARDING SLATTER SLATTER
4 LOVELL SMITH BOWLER SANDERS
5 CLERKE FREEMAN PERKINS BOWLER
6 BAKER WHITE RUSH PERKINS
7 TURNER WINSLOW WALKER RUSH
8 SAUNDERS WRIGHT PLESTED WALKER
9 CROKE OSBORN MESSER PLESTED
10 BOWDEN CARTER CADLE MESSER

Description

Description of Chilton from J. J. Sheahan, 1861

 Chilton, including the hamlet of Easington, contains 2,080 acres, and 364 inhabitants. Rateable value, £1,946. The soil is a clayey loam, with a strata of lime and rubble.

The village is a small and retired, and lies 3.5 miles N. by W. from Thame, and 8.5 miles W. from Aylesbury.

The school, which is entirely supported by the incumbant, is held in a neat ancient building. There is a good organ in the school-room. About 60 children attend. Attached to the school-building is a residence for the teacher.

Easington.

This hamlet at present consists of two farms and ten cottages, on the south of Chilton parish, about midway between Chilton and Crendon. It is situated on high ground, and surrounded by lofty trees. The place is supposed to derive its name from its eastern situation as respected Bernwood Forest.

Education

Chilton with Easington Parish (Pop. 314)

One Sunday School, in which about 60 of both sexes are instructed at the expense of the incumbent.

There are three small Schools, in which several children are taught lace-making.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

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