There are over 250 parishes in the county, here they have been divided into five groups based on modern boundaries. Before 1974 all records are defined by the historic county boundaries which included the town of Milton Keynes and followed the Thames in the south of the county.

Material is being transferred into this section and the old format retired.

Creslow

Introduction

Church:

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 481221

Grid Ref SP810210 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Creslow PARISH  
Christlow NAMES name for Creslow in 1780 & 1806
Cresselai NAMES name for Creslow in Domesday Book in 1086
Crestlow NAMES name for Creslow in 1806
Crislow NAMES name for Creslow in 1726
Kyrslewe NAMES name for Creslow in 1535
Kyrslow NAMES name for Creslow in 1526

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HARRIS SEABROOK ROWLAND ROWLAND
2 WESTCAR SCOTT RICKARD SEABROOK
3 THARPE DANCER PITTS SCOTT
4 SIRETT HEDGES MEAD DANCER
5 SEABROOK WESTCAR MASON HEDGES
6 SCOTT THARPE KEINCH WESTCAR
7 ROWLAND SIRETT HOPWOOD THARPE
8 RICKARD ROWLAND GOUGH SIRETT
9 PITTS MING DICKENS RICKARD
10 MING DURLEY CUMBERLAND PITTS

 

Description

 Description of Creslow from Sheahan, 1861.

Although Creslow is really a distinct parish, yet since the church became dilapidated, it has been considered to be a hamlet to Whitchurch. According to Census Returns its area is 620 acres, but local estimation makes it about 850 acres. It is in one farm and belongs to Lord Clifford of Chudleigh; Richard Rowland Esq; being the occupier of it, and the old mansion - the only house in the place. This house stands about one mile north of Whitchurch.

There is a description of the church being a dovecote for the Manor House with the last vicar being presented in 1554 in Pevsner along with a description of the many changes to the Manor House itself.

 

Cublington

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1223

Easting & Northing: 483222

Grid Ref SP830220 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cublington PARISH St Nicholas
Coblincote NAMES name for Cublington in Domesday Book in 1086
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1850

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 271
1811 233
1821 259
1831 284
1841 290
1851 287
1861 288
1871 283
1881 259
1891 223
1901 215
1911 178
1921 165
1931 130
1941 N/A
1951 135
1961 163
1971 195
1981 281
1991 314

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cublington   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1566   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cublington   St Nicholas   Marriages   1570   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cublington   St Nicholas   Burials   1575   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GRACE GREEN HALSEY HALSEY
2 BROUGHTON KEENE BIGGS BIGGS
3 KING ELLIOTT CHENEY CHENEY
4 GREENE WHITE WHITE WHITE
5 BREAMER STONE CARTER CARTER
6 CHENEY HARRIS CLARK GREEN
7 MITCHELL BRANDON HARRIS HARRIS
8 CLEMENTS GRACE HIGGINS STEVENS
9 SKELTON COLES CUTLER CLARK
10 FRANCKE KING STEVENS HIGGINS

 

Description

There cannot be many villages in England that have actually moved, but Cublington has!  It is situated in the Vale of Aylesbury and the earliest mention of Cublington is in the Domesday Book when 'Coblincote' consisted of 10 hides (1000 acres) and land for nine ploughs. The property, worth £6 per annum, then belonged to one Gozelin from Brittany, a follower of William the Conqueror.

In 1322, sixteen households in the village were wealthy enough to be taxed but by 1341 when King Edward III imposed new rates on country parishes it was reported that about 100 acres of land lay fallow and uncultivated and 13 houses stood empty. The tenants, being so poor, had left the village. There were few lambs and sheep and no-one substantial enough to be taxed. For what specific reason, it is not clear, maybe the Black Death and badly drained land, but the village went into decline.

By 1400 it had been reborn on its present site with a new church built in its centre. Many of the materials of the old church - stone and timber — were re-used in the new one and some of the fittings, like the old parish chest, were installed in the new church. This old chest — the oldest in Buckinghamshire — is still in use today.
The old village site is still visible after all these years and is classified as an Ancient Monument. It lies in the field at the end of Ridings Way and has a footpath running through it.  Journeying today towards Cublington from Stewkley one travels along a switchback of a route lined on both sides by farmland, tall hedges and verges of wild flowers until one comes upon what remains of the Old Manor and its outbuildings. Built in the early 18th century the Manor House was burned down around 1800 but the granary and range of stables and dovecotes, having stood empty and derelict for many years have now been restored to make two beautiful homes.
Turn here into Reads Lane, named after a local farmer whose family, four generations later, still farm in the village. Tucked away along Reads Lane one finds the beginnings of a very modern farming venture — the production of ewes milk cheese and yoghurt. The lane leads out onto the Wing road.
It is just a short distance to the crossroads and it is along here one finds the village hall. Originally the village school, it was built with money provided by a generous local benefactor, Mr Biggs. It closed as a school many years ago but was re-opened during the Second World War to accommodate the many children who were evacuated to the village.

A few yards further on are the 'Evergreen Nurseries' where so many varieties of conifer are grown. This is the site of the village bakehouse which closed about 25 years ago. A certain Mr Stonal made pies locally which were cooked at the bakehouse before being sold out of the area.
At the crossroads, obscured by a high hedge is the village pond. Before water was piped to the village women were known to have used the water from the pond for their washing. In those days, few houses even had sinks and pumps were used for drinking water. An elderly inhabitant believes there are 22 wells in Cublington, most of which are covered by concrete slabs and a potential hazard for the unwary.

Times have changed considerably since the turn of the century. The mothers were kept busy with their large families whilst their menfolk worked locally on the farms. Young women usually went 'into service', often to other villages or Leighton Buzzard and almost all walked to their places of work. The village was pretty self-sufficient with its own bakery, farm produce and a store but should one have needed to visit Leighton Buzzard, a carrier came twice each week to take passengers. There was poverty and hard work but a strong sense of unity and friendship.

One of the highlights of the year in those days was the Annual Feast with much eating and drinking and jollity. There were amusements for all ages and a wonderful day was enjoyed by all. Efforts were made during the last decade or so to hold a Feast again and for a number of years it was very successful but it no longer takes place.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Cublington from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 1,290 acres; population, 287; rateable value, £1,961. The land is chiefly in pasture. The village is small, and lies 7 miles N.N.E. from Aylesbury, and 6 miles W.S.W. from Leighton Buzzard.

 Population in 1851 was 287 and in 1861 was 288. There were 58 dwellings in 1851 and 62 in 1861.

Education

Cublington Parish (Pop. 284)

One Sunday School, in which from 30 to 60 children receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


Cuddington

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1308

Easting & Northing: 473211

Grid Ref SP730110 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cuddington PARISH St Nicholas
Coydyngton NAMES name for Cuddington in 1535
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Dadbrook. First Mentioned: c1650. Present building 1831
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1830. Rebuilt 1864
Cowley PLACE within the parish
Dadbrook PLACE within the parish
Gibraltar PLACE within the parish
Holywell PLACE within the parish
Spurt St PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 435
1811 462
1821 547
1831 620
1841 626
1851 623
1861 590
1871 532
1881 476
1891 443
1901 455
1911 479
1921 431
1931 418
1941 N/A
1951 451
1961 594
1971 623
1981 573
1991 555

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1653   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Marriages   1590   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Burials   1653   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Cuddington     Mixed         1863     1897         Logbook
    Cuddington     Mixed         1897     1923         Logbook
    Cuddington - Not available     Mixed         1923     1936     Yes     Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PIDDINGTON HOLLYMAN PIDDINGTON PIDDINGTON
2 CLARKE PIDDINGTON HAWKINS HAWKINS
3 HICKMAN CHAPMAN WEBB ROSE
4 BURNARD GREENWOOD ROSE WEBB
5 SMITH WHEELER SCOTT HOLLYMAN
6 WHELLER PLATER FROST SCOTT
7 ALMOND GUILFORD BETTS ROADNIGHT
8 ROSE ROSE WATSON FROST
9 HOLLYMAN HILL ROADNIGHT BETTS
10 HORE STEVENS CROTON WATSON

Description

Cuddington, a small village of approximately 600 inhabitants, is situated six miles from the County town of Aylesbury.
Cuddington's parish church with its Norman pillars has a list of vicars dating back to the 12th century, and the village also has a Methodist and a Baptist church.

Cuddington, however, is by no means without its own amenities; it has a village store with post office, a hairdresser's, two picturesque pubs and a playing field with club. A well-run village hall is the venue for many weekly activities. All groups in the village combine to organise an annual fete — always a very happy and successful occasion.
There are still a few farms in the parish, but most people work in the surrounding towns, with a few commuting to London. The village also has an increasing number of retired people.

In 1985 Cuddington won the Wilkinson Sword for the Best Kept of all Buckinghamshire Villages. The well looked after churchyard with War Memorial and the two village greens were particularly praised. The Parish Council has an extensive tree planting scheme in hand to compensate for lost elm trees.
One side of the village has a view of the distant Chilterns, whereas a drive way in the centre of the village leads down in the opposite direction to the neighbouring village of Nether Winchendon, whose Manor House estate used to own many of the houses in Cuddington. A narrow stretch of the river Thame runs through the meadows between these two villages, and beyond, the land rises to the ridge of Upper Winchendon.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

I was born in 1907 and brought up in the lovely old village of Cuddington. At school I was taught reading, writing and arithmetic. We girls were also taught sewing and the boys were taught gardening.
We were a very large family, and lived in a small cottage where the village hall now stands. My parents slept in one of our two bedrooms, and all the brothers and sisters slept in the second bedroom, four or five in one bed, some at the top and some at the bottom of the bed. By the morning some of us would be under the bed.

We had one living room and a small scullery. There was no sink and water had to be drawn from the well which was halfway up the garden. The old earth closet was up the other side of the garden. Cooking was done on an open fire. There was no electric light; we used candles and an oil lamp.

We had a large garden planted with vegetables, and Father had an allotment where he grew potatoes and greens which kept us going through the winter.
Father worked on a farm, and in the summer we had to take him his tea when he was haymaking and harvesting, sometimes having to walk a few miles across the fields. Mother was a very busy woman, and she would be called out any time of the day or night to deliver somebody's baby; she was a sort of local midwife, and when she had a little one of her own, she had to take it with her. She was also called out if someone died, to perform the necessary duties.

In the school holidays, we used to play down at the mill and paddle in the millpond, and play in the meadows and make daisy chains. We found all kinds of wild flowers – cowslips, ladysmocks, orchids (which we used to call King Fingers) and lovely quaking grasses.

We didn’t have any luxuries; no Easter eggs, or toys at Christmas, no birthday cards, but we were quite happy and contented. There were always a lot of gipsies around and on Sunday mornings one would come with his barrel organ and monkey and play in the street.

We had a brass band in the village, and they paraded around the village at holiday time. We had a Village Feast once a year in May, with swings, roundabouts, coconut shy and stalls – in all a great occasion.

Our village had a post office, a grocer's and a butcher, and when we came out of school we would watch the butcher kill the pigs in the yard and burn them on straw. The butcher would then throw the pigs’ toenails across the road, and we would all scramble to get one to chew. They tasted delicious.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "Buckinghamshire Within Living Memory" (1993) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Cuddington from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Cuddington is bound on the north west by the river Thame, and contains 1,281 acres, of the rateable value £2071. The population, 623 souls. The soil is a clayey loam, with limestone and rubble. The greater portion of the land is arable, and the remainder excellent pasture land. Stone of good quality and used for building purposes, is extensively quarried here. In the southern part of the parish, on the brow of a hill just below Dadbrook House, is a Medicinal Spring, which rises in Haddenham parish, and was formerly of some celebrity. This water is received in a stone reservoir, near the highway, and is remarkably clear and pleasant to the taste.

The village is large and tolerably compact, and contains some respectable, through old farm dwellings, and a number of old thatched cottages. Is stands in a narrow valley north of the road from Aylesbury to Thame , 5.5 miles S.W. from the former town, and the same distance N.E. of the latter. Pillow lace is made here.

The Church (St Nicholas), which stands nearly in the center of the village, is a handsome structure of mixed styles of architecture, was thoroughly restored 1858, by subscription. Its parts are a chancel, nave, side aisles, south porch, and square tower. The latter appendage is embattled, and has at the north-west corner, a demi-pentagonal turret, containing a spiral staircase, rising above the elevation. This turret is also embattled. The tower contains a window in each face, a clock with a dial on the south side, and five bells.

The Vicarage House was erected by the present incumbent in 1857. It is a handsome building of brick, pleasantly situated about a quarter of a mile from the church, on high ground. The gardens attached to it are planted with choice shrubs and flowers.

Education

Cuddington Parish (Pop. 620)

Three Sunday Schools,

one with 30 children who attend the Established Church; supported by the parish funds;

the other two are attached to Wesleyans and Baptists, and consist of 71 children; supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Dagnall

Introduction

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 499216

Grid Ref SP990160 Click to see map

Names

Places

NameTypeNote
Dagnall PARISH All Saints

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HUMPHREY JOHNSON CUTLER JOHNSON
2 WHITLOCK SEARE ROGERS CUTLER
3 SAWELL HULME BRIDGEWATER HUMPHREY
4 DEANE SQUIRE JANES ROGERS
5 DEAN GINGER MUNN BRIDGEWATER
6 BATTY FISHER GADSDEN JANES
7 ROBERTS COOK DRAPER MUNN
8 PERRY PAYNE PUTMAN SEARE
9 SEARE HUMPHREY SIMMONDS HULME
10 EDDOWES HIGBID TEARLE DEAN

Description

Description of Dagnall as a hamlet from J.J. Sheahan, 1861

Dagnall is a considerable hamlet or village situated about 2 miles S.E. from the parish church, and about the same distance E. from Ivinghoe. It lies in a well wooded valley surrounded by hills on all sides except the north; and it has a picturesque and romantic appearance from some of these neighbouring eminences. The Icknield Way is about a mile distant from the village. The Chiltern Hills are, in this locality, unusually lofty and diversified. A portion of an old farm-house is used as a school, in which Divine Service in likewise performed every Sunday.

This hamlet had a Chapel of Ease dedicated to All Saints or All Hallows. In early notices of Eddesborough parish Libscomb tells us that the "advowson of the Church of Dagnall " occurs

There are no remains of Dagnall Chapel existing, and its site is not known.

Dinton

Introduction

Church: St Peter and St Paul

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 3897

Easting & Northing: 476210

Grid Ref SP760100 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Dinton PARISH St Peter and St Paul
Aston Mulling NAMES name for Aston Mullins in 1766
Danitone NAMES name for Dinton in the Domesday Book in 1086
Denton NAMES name for Dinton in 1514 - 1521
Donyngton NAMES name for Dinton in 1500
Dynton NAMES name for Dinton in 1526
West Dinton NAMES name for Westlington in 1825
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1847
General Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Ford. First Mentioned: 1669
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1847
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Westlington. First Mentioned: 1830
Aston Mullins PLACE within the parish
Ford PLACE within the parish
Moreton PLACE within the parish
Upton PLACE within the parish
Waldridge PLACE within the parish
Westlington PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 668
1811 713
1821 817
1831 893
1841 818
1851 859
1861 814
1871 790
1881 718
1891 747
1901 663
1911 616
1921 659
1931 606
1941 N/A
1951 626
1961 651
1971 722
1981 745
1991 779

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Dinton   St Peter & St Paul   Baptisms   1560   1889   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dinton   St Peter & St Paul   Marriages   1567   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dinton   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1653   1689   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dinton   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1653   1689   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Dinton   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1738   1743   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SANDERS HITCHCOCK WELFORD SAUNDERS
2 DOVER SAUNDERS SAUNDERS WELFORD
3 HUNT BISHOP WALKER SANDERS
4 BISHOP LUDGATE KEEN HITCHCOCK
5 ROBYNS HANCE STEVENS BISHOP
6 SAUNDERS CLARK PAXTON WALKER
7 SMITH SMITH KINGHAM STEVENS
8 MARCH MARCH SAW PAXTON
9 SMYTH ROGERS JONES KEEN
10 HURST PAXTON SANDERS LUDGATE

Description

Description of Dinton from Sheahan, 1861.

Dinton parish, including the hamlets of Aston Mollins, Ford, Upton and Waldridge, and the liberty of Morton, is computed to be seventeen miles of circuit. Area 4,100 acres; population 859; rateable value, £5,385. The soil is in some parts a deep rich loam, and in others gravel, alternated with clay: the substrata is chiefly limestone, and various fossils are found, mostly of the Cardium and Buccinum genra. The surface is pleasingly undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by the river Thame, which flows through the parish. The pasture land is remarkably fertile.

The village lies 4.5 miles W.S.W. from Aylesbury, and 6 miles N.E. of Thame. It is rather large, and stands pleasantly in a well wooded spot. A stately avenue of trees extends here along the high road.

The vicarage house, a large Gothic residence situated a short distance eastward from the church, was erected in 1836, by the present Vicar, the Rev. John Harrison.

The National School stands on glebe land, and is a neat substantial building erected in 1840, at the sole cost of the present Vicar. About 50 children attend.

The Independents have a small Chapel in the village.

Education

Dinton with Ford and Upton Parish,
including the Hamlet of Aston-Mollins and Moreton Liberty, (Pop. 893)

Six Daily Schools, containing about 100 children, (chiefly girls, many of whom are taught lace-making) all instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School (commenced 1832), attended by 56 males daily, and 150 of both sexes on Sundays; supported by subscription, and weekly payments of one penny from the day scholars, belonging to the Established
Church.

One Sunday School, appertaining to Baptists, wherein from 30 to 40 children of both sexes receive gratuitous instruction; a Library has lately been formed at the expense of the clergyman of the parish, to which all have free access.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Dorton

Introduction

Church: St John the Baptist

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 1477

Easting & Northing: 468214

Grid Ref SP680140 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Dorton PARISH St John the Baptist
Dortone NAMES name for Dorton in Domesday Book in 1086
Hough Wood NAMES name for Howe Wood in 1826
Hough gate NAMES name for Howe Wood in 1766
Howe Wood PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 105
1811 124
1821 133
1831 158
1841 151
1851 139
1861 137
1871 125
1881 111
1891 137
1901 140
1911 139
1921 135
1931 133
1941 N/A
1951 144
1961 128
1971 124
1981 124
1991 200

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Dorton   St John the Baptist   Baptisms   1590   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Dorton   St John the Baptist   Marriages   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Dorton   St John the Baptist   Burials   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GOULDER SMITH EDWARDS EDWARDS
2 GRACE WATSON LONG POLLARD
3 GOLDER REEVES POLLARD LONG
4 KEENE POLLARD GUNTRIP SILVER
5 EELES BLAKE SILVER GUNTRIP
6 SHIRLY PARROTT BUNYAN WATSON
7 DEWE EDWARDS TIPPING SMITH
8 WATSON REEVE FULLER BUNYAN
9 FOLYATE PARROT MUMFORD REEVES
10 STONE GOODSON WATSON PARROTT

Description

Description of Dorton from Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 1431 acres; population, 138 ; rateable value, £2,240. The soil is a stiff dark clay intermixed with sand and rubble. The village is small and compact, and distant from Thame6 miles N.N.W., and from Aylesbury 11 miles W. The females make pillow lace, and the children attend the National School at Brill.

Dorton is situated near the basis of three hills, whereof the principle is Brill, and seems to to have its appellation , according to Libscomb, from its humid situation.

Dorton Chalybeate Spa. - This powerfully chalybeate spring takes its rise in a meadow at the termination of a glen formed on the eastern side of Brill - one of a chain of hills opposite the Chilterns. Neither the Messers. Lysons nor Dr. Lipscomb mention this mineral spring, but we learn much that is interesting respecting it from two treatises written by the late T.Knight Esq., sureon of Brill, and published respectively in 1833 and 1843 "The course of the had been for years marked by the destruction it occasioned to vegetable life," write Mr.Knight, and by its encrusting the blades of grass, as it were, with iron mail, - depositing around them thick layers of the brown oxide. O exploring the soil for its source, at the depth of 16 feet, it gave the following singulr character: The more superficial part consisted of loose loam, with quantities of shattered lime shells; beneath this were lose layers of an unctuous clay - friable, and studded with slender prisms of sulphate of lime; also a pale yellow powder of the smell and appearance of lac sulphuris, and large portions of oxyde of iron.

Several years ago the proprietor of the Dorton estate (C.S.Ricketts, Esq.), anxious to give the public at large every facility of access to the water, erected a Pump Roomand Baths on an extensive and ornamental plan. This hansome structure, which was after a Grecian model, is entered by a flight of stone stepsand through a semicircular portico supported by eight circular pillars painted to represent Sienna marble. Besides the pump-room and eight baths, the building also contains a reading room, billiard room and two ball rooms.

Education

Dorton Parish (Pop. 158)

The children of this parish attend the National Schools at Brill.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Drayton Beauchamp

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1888

Easting & Northing: 490212

Grid Ref SP900120 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Drayton Beauchamp PARISH St Mary
Daraintone NAMES name for Drayton in Domesday Book in 1086
Draitone NAMES name for Drayton Beauchamp in Domesday Book in 1086
Draitone NAMES name for Drayton in Domesday Book in 1086
Drayton Becham NAMES name for Drayton Beauchamp in 1526
Drayton Pasloo NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1535
Drayton Paslow NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1526
Drayton Passelowe NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1501
Helstrope PLACE within the parish
Painsend PLACE within the parish
Shire Lane PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 191
1811 224
1821 272
1831 275
1841 231
1851 261
1861 268
1871 227
1881 194
1891 177
1901 149
1911 147
1921 146
1931 153
1941 N/A
1951 156
1961 141
1971 137
1981 167
1991 161

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Baptisms   1538   1820   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Marriages   1541   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Burials   1653   1830   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BATE BROWN SMITH SMITH
2 NORWOOD SMITH STRATFORD BROWN
3 PAYNE MORTIMER GRIFFIN BATE
4 MARTIN PUTTENHAM HORWOOD GRIFFIN
5 MALLARD GREEN STEVENS NORWOOD
6 BAATE COVENTRY CHAPPIN MARTIN
7 DURRENT BATES RODWELL PAYNE
8 PUTNAM WATERS PARADINE STRATFORD
9 STONHILL GRIFFIN CHAPMAN PUTTENHAM
10 HAILE PIDDINGTON HORN MORTIMER

Description

Description of Drayton Beauchamp from Sheahan, 1861.

This parish lies on the eastern verge of the county, occupying a narrow tract of land above seven miles in length, by half a mile in width. It includes a portion of the Chiltern range of hills, and is bounded on the east by Hertfordshire. The area is 1,874 acres, and the number if its inhabitants 269. The soil is clay and chalk, with a kind of rag stone, used only for repairing the roads. The greater part of the land is arable, with about 130 acres of woodland.

The village, which is situated 2 miles W. by N. from Tring, and 6 miles E. by S. from Aylesbury, is pretty and rural, and consists of three farm houses, and a dozen and a half of neat cottages, in couples; each possessing a small garden. The place is watered by a clear rivulet.

Education

Drayton Beauchamp Parish (Pop. 275)

The children have opportunity of attending Schools in adjoining parishes.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Subcategories