There are over 250 parishes in the county, here they have been divided into five groups based on modern boundaries. Before 1974 all records are defined by the historic county boundaries which included the town of Milton Keynes and followed the Thames in the south of the county.

Material is being transferred into this section and the old format retired.

Amersham

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 6119

Easting & Northing: 496198

Grid Ref SU960980 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Amersham PARISH St Mary
Agmomdesham NAMES name for Amersham in Domesday Book in 1086
Agmondesham Wodrowe NAMES name for Woodrow in 1520
Agmundisham NAMES name for Amersham in 1600
Amotesham NAMES name for Amersham in 1414
Egmonsham NAMES name for Amersham in 1513
Hakmersham NAMES name for Amersham in 1483
Hamersham NAMES name for Amersham in 1522
Rheins Fm NAMES name for Raan's Farm in 1826
Sharlees NAMES name for Shardeloes in 1625
Wheedon NAMES name for Weedonhill in 1826
Witley Wood NAMES name for Wheatley Wood in 1826
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Upper Meeting House. First Mentioned: 1669. Formed a separate society in 1675
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Coleshill Preaching Station. First Mentioned: ?. Recorded 1851 Religious census
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Lower Meeting House, High Street. First Mentioned: 1740. Seceded from Upper Meeting House
Free Church, undenominational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1911
Methodist Chapel NON-CONFORMIST High Street
Plymouth Brethren NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1935
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Friends Meeting House, Whielden Street. First Mentioned: 1660
United Reformed Church NON-CONFORMIST Woodside Rd. First Mentioned: 1908
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST Bury End later Woodside Road. First Mentioned: 1818
Amersham Common PLACE within the parish
Amersham Union Workhouse PLACE the workhouse in Whielden Street
Amersham on the Hill PLACE within the parish
Coleshill PLACE detached part of Hertfordshire
Mantles Green PLACE within the parish
Mop End (Part) PLACE within the parish
Quarrendon (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Shardeloes PLACE house in parish
Weedonhill (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Wheatley Wood PLACE within the parish
Whielden Lane PLACE within the parish
Winchmore Hill (Part) PLACE within the parish
Woodrow PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 2130
1811 2259
1821 2612
1831 2816
1841 3098
1851 3104
1861 3019
1871 2726
1881 2500
1891 2613
1901 2674
1911 3392
1921 4221
1931 6121
1941 N/A
1951 10894
1961 14612
1971 17254
1981 17396
1991 17144

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Amersham   Lower Meeting House   Baptisms   1773   1812   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Amersham   St Mary   Baptisms   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Amersham   St Mary   Marriages   1561   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Amersham   St Mary   Burials   1561   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Amersham   Lower Meeting House   Burials   1784   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CHILD CHILD COX CHILD
2 BALL NASH SMITH NASH
3 HARDING HUNT SAUNDERS BALL
4 HILL SHRIMPTON SLADE SMITH
5 NASH MILES ROGERS HILL
6 HARDINGE HATCH SHRIMPTON SAUNDERS
7 CLARKE HOBBS LANE SHRIMPTON
8 HUNT AYRES BALL ROGERS
9 HILLAM SMITH BATSON HUNT
10 CHILDE HILL KEEN COX

 

Churches

Churches

BAPTIST CHURCH (Upper Meeting House)

1669 Archbishop Sheldon’s Questionaire
For Anabaptists, of these we have a meeting at Woodside in David Symson’s house. One Robert Turner, a maltster in the town is often their preacher, and some time Edwards Ednepp, a blacksmith, and sometimes others out of other parishes. Their numbers at a time I know not, these have so met about these two years, which is so long as I have been in the town, and how long before I know not.
1677 Baptist Meeting House built
1706 Bishop Wake’s Episcopal Returns
{Amersham] is a large extent and has bout 200 fanmilies in it
There are many dissenters, especially Anabaptist and Quakers who each have of them a meeting house in it.
1709 Bishop Wake’s Episcopal Returns
Families 400; souls 2,000; dissenters of all kinds, chiefly Anabaptists and Quakers; these meet every Sunday; in number the former of 70, the latter of 90. About one third of the parish are dissenters
1779 Meeting House rebuilt at cost of John Harding
1797 25 April Death of John Harding of Amersham Common
1823 Meeting House passed to seceders from the Lower Meeting House
1944 Meeting House sold. Now private house

BAPTIST CHURCH (Lower Meeting House)

1777 House of Richard Morris in Amersham registered as a meeting house.
1783 Fund opened to erect "a more commodiuos building" on part of Richard Morris's "Great Yard"
1816 Rental Morris, Richard: For a house in the High Street formerly Henry Hobbs
in his own occupation Freehold 3d
1817 Death of Richard Morris
1842 British School built on rear of Baptist Chapel
1980 Interior refitted.

BAPTIST CHURCH (Woodrow)

1713 Upper Meeting House
Baptised Sister Bigg of Woodrow by Brother North and had hands laid on her by Borther Charsley
1725 Dwelling house of John Bigg, sawyer, at Woodenrow in the parish of Amersham licenced as a meeting house
1734 1 May Recited in BAS 1260/38
1) John Bigg of Woodrow husbandman & Ann his wife
2) Philip James of Hemsted Herts Doctor of Divinity
Francis Walker of Princes Risborough gent
Robert Dorsett of Haddingham gent
Joshua Russell of Wapping Middlesex brewer
Samuel Burch junior of London corn factor
John Lane of Bovingdon Herts husbandman
Richard Moor of Coleshill labourer
Joseph Wheeler of Chesham clothworker
John Tims of Chesham bricklayer
Jonas Bovingdon of Woodrow husbandman
Francis Fryer of Chenies husbandman
Lazarus Pratt of Amersham glover
Thomas Honnor of Woodrow shoemaker
All that piece or parcel of ground with appurtenances situate lying and being at Woodrow then or late in the tenure or occupation of the said John Bigg and Ann his wife....for the purpose of erecting building and setting up thereon a tenement edifice or building to be from time to time and at all times during the said term of 800 years used and enjoyed by a Society or Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of which they the said grantees were the chosen trustees as a meeting house or place of public and religious worship ...
1738 Rental Manor of Woodrow
Wm Drake: David Salter
For lands and premises hereafter mentioned:
Dovehouse Mead adjoining to his house 3a
In Church Field, Gospel Field & Meeting House Platt 25a
1741 Entries in the parish registers for burials at Woodrow from this date
1775 Rev Richard Morris came to Woodrow from Lancashire to preach the Baptists cause
1781 5 July BAS 1260/38
1) Thomas Honnor of Beaconsfield Taylor son of Thomas Honnor late of Woodrow shoemaker
2) Simon Verlander of Amersham collector of excise
John Hailey the elder of Amersham plumber & glazier
Nathaniel Palmer of Penn cordwainer
George Rogers of Penn husbandman
James Carter of Penn husbandman
Thomas Parker of Penn cordwainer
1792 Woodrow meeting house abandoned. Congregation joins fellow Particular Baptists in the town.

Description

Extract from the Universal British Directory 1791

Is a borough town. It is 26 miles from London; has a market on Tuesdays; fairs Whitsun-Monday for cattle, 19th of September for ditto and statute. The chief manufactures are lace, which is considerably large chiefly black lace; the sacking manufacture, which is but small and a manufactory for cotton, by Messrs. Morris, Hailey, and Hailey, of all kinds of white cotton goods, by machinery of the newest, and some of it of peculiar, construction.

It lies in a vale between woody hills, near the river Colne, and has a free school, founded in the reign of queen Elizabeth. This little town consists of a long street, in the road from Uxbridge to Buckingham, divided about the middle by a shorter cross street; in the intersection of which stands the church; its town-hall, or market-house, is the handsomest in the county. The living is said to be the best in England. Here are three inns, at which are good accommodations ; the Crown inn, Fowler; the Griffin inn, Loton ; the King's Arms, Morgan. The post-office, at the Crown inn, opens mornings at 7, and shuts at 9 o'clock in the evening. Aylesbury stage coach to London at 10 every day, except Saturday; and 1 o'clock in the afternoon from London every day, except Sunday; stops at the Griffin; inside fare 7s. outside 3s. 6d.- Amersham and Missenden stage coach, from the Crown inn, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 8 in the morning; comes in Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, at 5 o'clock in the evening ; fare as above. Waggon Mondays and Thursdays, at noon to London; comes in Wednesdays and Saturdays, at 6 o'clock in the evening. On the hill, rather North of Amersham, is the seat of John Drake, D. D. which commands a fine view of the town; rather beyond the town, West, it the seat of William Drake, Esq. M. P. a noble house, in a fine large pleasant park. It is 3 miles from Amersham to Chesham ; 5 miles to Beaconsfield; 7 miles to High Wycomb; 3 miles to Little Missenden, a small village, at which there is a church, the minister, the Rev. Mr. Anderson. Here is a boarding, school for young ladies, by Mrs. Reed. Five miles from Amersham, is Great Missenden, a large village, in it is a church, the minister, Rev. Mr. Nevell a little beyond this, is the seat of Capt. Backas, one of his majesty's justices of the peace. It is 3 miles from Amersham to St. Giles's Chalfont, a small village, near which is the seat of Sir Hugh Palliser, Bart, and also, not far from hence, is the seat of Henry Gath, Esq. one of his majesty's justices of the Peace; it is also 5 miles from Amersham to St. Peter's Chalfont, a large village, at which is a church, the Rev. Mr. Jonas, minister, who is one of his majesty's justices of the peace.

 

Houses

BEEL HOUSE


1668 Some Account of the Circumstances in the Life of Mary Pannington from her manuscript left for her Family
We sought within a compass of four or five miles, but could find none.... Whilst I was thus distressed, and we had nearly concluded on going to Waltham Abbey, R.T. came to see us, and much bewailed our going out of the country, and having no place near them to return to. At length he asked why we did not buy some little place near them.... He said he had an uncle that had a little place that he would sell for about thirty pounds a year, that stood about a mile from the meeting house in a healthy situation; that there was a house on it, which might be trimmed up, and made habitable for a little expense.... Soon after T.B. came in ; I told him of the proposal made by R.T. He encouraged the thing saying that he had heard there were some rooms in the house that might serve. That night Thomas Elwood came out of Kent, and told me he had much to do to come back without selling my farm at Westbeer. I laid all these things together, and said “I think the best way is to sell Westbeer, and purchase this place which R.T. has mentioned; and with the overplus of money, put the house in a condition to receive us”. Next day I took Ann Bull with me and went on foot to Woodside, to John Humphrey’s house to view it. We came in by Hill’s Lane, through the orchard. The house appeared in such a ruinous condition, so unlikely to be fitted up, that I did not go inside it; and we gave over all thoughts about it, till we were disappointed of a house in Beaconsfield, which my husband was in treaty about. Upon this, we were pressed to go and see the house again, which T.E., H.B. and I did. Whilst I went about the house, they viewed the grounds. In less than half an hour I had the whole thing clearly in my mind, what to pull down, and what to add; and thought it might be done with the overplus money of the sale of Westbeer, that being valued at fifty pounds a year, and this thirty. I was quite recociled to the thing, and willing to treat about it. The day we went to see it, we walked to Chalfont, and took my son Penn’s coach thither, desiring him to make enquiry respecting the title etc. and let me know at Waltham, which he did, and sent us word that the title was clear, but that it was judged fifty pounds too dear...”

1680 Will of Mary Penington leaves property to son John Penington
1682 Death of Mary Penington.
1694 Oct 30 D/CH/A/13
1) John Tanner the elder
John Penington
2) Mary Prince widow
Listed in schedule to 1821 deed D/CH/A/13
1700 1 June
1) John Penington
2) Harbert Springett
William Springett
1708 31 May Will of John Penington of Amersham Woodside
Leaves to executors brother Daniel Wharley and Thomas Elwood of Coleshill in the parish of Amersham “all that messuage or tenement wherein I now dwell called Beale House with the lands appurtenances thereto belonging situate lying and being in the parish of Amersham”
1710 March 8 Death of John Penington. Buried at Jordans: John Penington of the hamlet of Woodside
1710 2 June Probate of Will of John Penington granted to Daniel Wharley and Thomas Elwood.
1713 1 May Death of Thomas Ellwood
1717 29 June
1) Daniel Wharley & Mary his wife
Thomas Pixley and Mary his wife
2) Robert Jackson
Listed in scedule to 1821 deed D/CH/A/13
1722 Amersham poor rate
Captain Jackson for late Peningtons £3.00
1728 Amersham court Rolls
Death of Robert Jackson who held freely messuage and land at Woodside
1730 2 April
1) Simon Aris
2) Peter How
Ann How
Grace Jackson
Bernard Swainson
Frances Swainson
3) Thomas White
4) Robert Attkyns sen
1738 Quit Rent
Foreigns of Amersham.
Thomas White Esq for house and land late Peningtons
1739 Quit Rent
Thos White Esq: in his own possession
House and land formerly Peningtons 1s 10d
1745 Quit Rent
Thomas White Esq for a house and land formerly Peningtons
1748 7 April
1) Thomas White and Margaret his wife
2) Johannah Stephens spinster
3) Philip Harcourt
1761 10 Dec
1) John Harcourt
2) Johannah Stephens
1761 24 Dec
1) Johannah Stephens
2) William Jennings
1763 4 March
1) Harcourt Powell
Anna Maria Poyntz
2) Rev Sepncer Cowpoer
3) Johannah Stephens
4) William Jennings & Harriet his wife
5) George Suthery
1764 10 May
1) George Suthery & Mary his wife
2) Robert Campbell
1768 13 Oct
1) Robert Campbell & Mary his wife
2) Richard woolley
Samuel Stanway
1769 29 June
1) Richard woolley
Samuel Stanway
2) Kender Mason
3) Robert Hassall
1770 Jeffery’s map Bail Hall Campbell Esq.
1783 Land Tax Amersham Woodside
Owner: Kendar Mason Occ: self house & Land £4 7s 4 1/2d
1786 26 July Will of Kendar mason of Hatton Street p of St Andrew Holborn
Estates in London Middlesex, Kent, Surrey, Bucks and plantations in Montserrat Antigua and Dominica.,
1790 Times Index 11 Oct Death of Mr K Mason
1791 Will of Kendar Mason proved 22 March
1791 Amersham Court Roll
Death of Kender Mason who held freely house and land at Woodside late Mrs Stevens
1798 Posse Comitatus Amersham Woodside
Kender Mason Esq 3 horses 1 wagon 1 cart
1816 Rental Kendar Mason Esq
For a capital messuage and land at Woodside formerly Mrs Stevens and late Kendar Mason Esq deceased in his own occ
Freehold 3s 8d
Sold to Henry William Mason Esq
William Lowndes Esq
1817 2 April D/CH/A/10
1) Henry William Pomeroy lately Henry William Mason of Chalfont St Peter Esq
eldest son & heir of Kendar Mason of Hatton Street Esq deceased
2) Kendar Mason of Beel House Amersham Esq
younger son & heir of Kendar Mason of Hatton Street Esq deceased
3) Lord George Henry Cavendish
Allotments on Amersham Common 11a 0r 2p & 9a 3r 32p
1821 13 January D/CH/A/13
1) Langford Lovell
Baijer Otto Baijer
Henry William Pomeroy
2) Henry William Pomeroy
3) Thomas Tyrwhit Drake
4) Lord George Henry Cavendish
(Schedule includes deeds to Beel House 1694-1821)
1824 Bryant’s Map Beel Ho
1829 Henry William Mason of Amersham Esq High Sheriff
1830 Directory Mason, Henry William Esq Beel House
1830 12 Aug
Mary Harriett, daughter of Kender Mason deceased married William Lowndes of The Bury Chesham
1831 Land Tax Amersham Woodside
Henry Mason Esq: Self £28 10s 3 1/2d
1836 August
1) Henry William Mason
2) William Lowndes
Beel House, Cokes farm and other lands

1839 Tithe Award 290-297
Owner: William Lowndes. Occ: Hon Lady Caroline Cavendish

1847 Directory Higham, John Esq Beel House

1883 Directory Milner, Dennis J.P. Beel House, The Common

1903 Directory Milner, Mrs. Beel House, The Common

? Tate & Lyle

1931 Directory Hargreaves, Mrs Arthur S Beel House

1939 Directory Mrs Arthur S Hargreaves, Beel House Amersham Common

1954 2 April
Bell House sold to Dirk Bogarde for £4,000 see Snakes & Ladders

 

SHARDELOES

1479     Thomas Cheyne buys Shardeloes manor for 200 marks
1591     Henry Cheyne & Henry his son sold Shardeloes to Henry Fleetwood
1595     Henry Fleetwood sold Shardeloes to William Tothill
    William Tothill (1557-1626)

1575    Richard Tothill, famous printer who held a patent for printing legal books, buys Manor of Wedon Hill, Amersham
1593    Death of Richard Tothill. Son William Tothill, one of the Six Clerks in Chancery, inherits Wedon Hill Manor
1595    William Tothill purchases Shardeloes from Henry Fleetwood
1624    Committee for Priviledges and Returns accepted case for boroughs of Amersham, Marlow and Wendover to resume sending M.P.s to Parliament. Case brought by William Hakewill of Lincolns Inn who was elected to one of the Amersham seats in 1628.
1624    William Tothill negotiating with Lord Russell for the purchase of the manor of Amersham. Sale particulars 16 May 1624. The 148 freehold tenants would each have a vote.
1625 Francis Drake M.P. for Amersham.
1625    Death of Joane Drake, wife of Francis Drake and dau & coheir of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham
1626    Death of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham 10 December 1626. Heirs grandson William son of Francis Drake, and dau Catherine Tothill

    Francis Drake (   -1633)

1625 Francis Drake M.P. for Amersham
1625    Death of Joane Drake, wife of Francis Drake and dau & coheir of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham
1633    Death of Francis Drake Esq of Esher, Surrey, Gent of Privy Chamber to James I bur at Walton on Thames

    William Drake (1606-1669)

    Chirographer to the Common Pleas

1630     William Drake M.P. for Amersham
1632    Catherine Tothill renounces right to Shardeloes in favour of her nephew William Drake
1637    William Drake of Shardeloes completes the purchase of the manor of Amersham from the Russells
1641     Sir William Drake created a baronet
1649    Sir William Drake in Italy until 1660. Leases 150 acres to James Perrott his steward on condition he provided diet for three people including Sir William's invalid aunt Catherine Tothill
1649     Lease for 3 years at £25 p.a.                    D/DR/1/1

    1) Sir William Drake of Shardeloes
    2) James Perrott of Amersham gent

                                                                           Acres
    Castrupps Close                                                     26
    Brokefield Close           Pasture                                  8
    Church Path Close                                                    7
    Highwood Close             Pasture                              10
    Brocksalls Close                                                       8
    Cherry Tree Close)
    Stony Field        )                                                    17
    Colliers Close                                                        14
    Orchard Field                                                         28
    Bentleyes Close  )
    Whiteleyes Close)        arable in occ William Trego    24
    New Warehouse Meadow         meadow                    28
    The Hopp Garden             moorish ground             1 1/2

    All in  Amersham parish

With barns stables and yards to the capital messuage or tenement called Shardeloes....     for the term of three years.... yearly rent or sum of £25 .... paying therefore for the said term of three years at Shardeloes aforesaid good wholesome and sufficient diet for three such persons as the said Sir William Drake shall there leave and appoint to inhabit.... and in case Mistress Katherine Tothill shall happen to depart this life at any time before the end of the said term and that there shall not be three persons there residing.... Sir William Drake.... will bear and pay all such taxes charges and expenses as he the said James Perrott his executors or assigns shall necessarily expend during the said term in quartering of soldiers and their horses at Shardeloes aforesaid and that the said James Perrott his wife and family may lawfully dwell and inhabit in some convenient part of the mansion house at Shardeloes

1657    Sir William Drake of Shardeloes builds six almshouses at Amersham
1669    Death of Sir William Drake of Shardeloes bur at Amersham Succeeded by nephew William Drake, son of brother Francis Drake of Walton on Thames
    William Drake (    -1690)

1661     William Drake M.P. for Amersham
    Married Elizabeth second dau & heir of Sir William Montague Knt Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer

1674     Rental
    John Sells hath taken ye several grounds following for 1 year and to enter in June 1675 and     lease it at our lady Day 1676 And then to be in the hands of Sir Wm Drake to let at an     improved rent or to keep them for ye accommodation of his house which he thinks most     convenient that is to say
    Highwood Close
    Church Path Close
    Brocksells
    Orchard Field
    Castrupps not to be ploughed nor broke up
    Middle Warehouse Mead
    Long Orchard

    £41 10s p.a.


1682     Market Hall built by Sir William Drake of Shardeloes
1690     Death of Sir William Drake of Shardeloes bur at Amersham
    Montague Drake (1673-1698)
1692     Ledger
    John Sells
    The new farm by the Fifh Ponds which had been Hayes £34 10s
    By 1697 this was called “Farm by the Pond, called The Canall” and the rent was reduced     to £31 10s but this was never paid in full, as a gift or allowance £17 p.a. was made to     Mrs Selles

1695     Montague Drake M.P. for Amersham

1698 21 July     Inventory of Montague Drake Esq of Shardeloes
                                £
    Stony Field        12 acres of wheat                    42  0 0
    Church Patch Close    9 acres of peas                   9  0 0
    Brookfield        9 acres of barley                        15 15 0
    Little Castrope        6 acres of beans & peas        10 10 0
    Upper Grove        rick of last years peas              6  0  0
    Long Orchard        5 rood of barley                      2  3  0
    Orchard Field        17 acres of oats                    25  5  0
    Wilderness        2 1/2 acres barley                      6  5  0

    Cherry Tree Close and the other field

    Score of weathers                                          13  0  0
    26 ewes & 6 lambs                                          9  0  0
    A cow calf                                                       3  0  0
    At grass 2 mares & 4 geldings                        15  0  0

   
1698     Rent Book                     D/DR2/18q

    Benjamin Peede
    For that farm by the Canal which had been left by John Seller widow 2 quarters £17 0 0
    1698-1705

1851     Census Shadeloes House
    staff only

 



Education

Education

Agmondesham, or Amersham Borough and Parish, including the Hamlet of Coleshill, situate in the County of Hertford (Pop. 3,313.)

Thirty-four Daily Schools, which collectively contain 201 males and 274 females; one of these is an Endowed Classical School, open to all the residents in the parish without restriction ; but the number of children at present on the foundation, are not distinguished from other daily scholars (the master states that full particulars have been furnished to the Commissioners of Charities;) another School is endowed with £20 per annum for writing and arithmetic; 20 boys (each of whom pay 4d. per week), are instructed by this charity; all the other children (the classical scholars excepted), are paid for by their parents.

One Day and Boarding School, wherein 38 males are educated at the expense of their parents.

Four Sunday Schools, in two of which are 133 males and 180 females,who attend the Established Church; these Schools are endowed under the will of the late William Drake, Esq., with £10. 12s. 10d. per annum, and are otherwise supported by voluntary contributions ; the other two are of the Baptist denomination, and supported by contributions, one of which consists of 70 males and 125 females; the other (commenced 1824), of 33 males and 31 females.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

Manor

AMERSHAM MANOR


1066 Queen Edith 7 1/2 hides

1086 Geoffrey de Mandeville 7 1/2 hides

1200 Earl of Essex secures Charter for a Friday market and a fair on the vigil and day of Nativity of the Virgin

1419 Duchy of Lancaster Rentals and Surveys Bundle 14 No 4

Manor let to John Jourdelay for £40 13s 4d

The site of the manor contained 2 acres, on which was built a hall with two rooms annexed covered with tiles. There were a chapel, a kitchen, dovecot worth 40d., and a sheepfold. Within the ‘Gayndriam’ was a new hall with a room, a stable and a small house with granary. There was another dovecot within a shed, and six woods called Hyswood, Westwod, Hoddesnesswod, Bernegrove, Stokburywod and Braynfordwod

Corn mills let at 100s.

John 1st Earl of Bedford (c1485-1555)


1485 Approximate date of Birth of John Ruseel at Berwick nr Bridport, Dorset

1506 Having travelled and aquired a knowledge for foreign languages, accompanies Archduke Philip of Austria to Court after he was driven into Weymouth in a storm en route from Flanders to Spain

1507 John Russel appointed Gentleman of the Privy Chamber by Henry VII

1520 Attended Henry VIII at Field of the Cloth of Gold

1521 Edward Duke of buckingham executed for treason. Manor of Amersham taken by the Crown

1522 John Russell knighted after the battle of Morlaix at which he lost his right eye.

1526 Married Anne dau of Guy Sapcote heiress to Chenies Manor
and builder of the Russell Chapel at Chenies Church

1526 Amersham granted to Sir John Russell, favourite of Henry VIII

1539 Created Baron Russell of Chenies

1540 Granted Abbey of Tavistock

1550 John Russell granted Abbey of Woburn and created Earl of Bedford

1554 Went to Spain to escort King Philip to England

1555 Death of John Earl of Bedford. Buried at Chenies. Succeeded by son Francis, 2nd Earl of Bedford

Francis 2nd Earl of Bedford (1527-1585)

1555 Francis 2nd Earl of Bedford succeeds to family property

1585 Death of Francis Earl of Bedford. Succeeded by grandson Edward

Edward 3rd Earl of Bedford (1572-1626)


1585 Edward 3rd Earl of Bedford succeeds grandfather

1601 Involvement in Essex's rebellion. Fined. Attempt to raise money by sale of property opposed by heir presumptive Francis

1613 Edward Earl of Bedford secures fresh grant of a market on Tuesday

1618 Francis Lord Russell appointed administrator of Chenies and Amersham estates

1626 Death of Edward 3rd Earl of Bedford. Buried at Chenies.

Francis 4th Earl of Bedford (1593-1641)


1637 Francis Earl of Bedford conveys manor of Amersham to William Drake for £7,500

1641 Francis 4th Earl of Bedford dies of small pox. Buried at Chenies

William Tothill (1557-1626)


1559 Patent to print law books granted to Richard Tothill for life

1575 Richard Tothill, famous printer who held a patent for printing legal books, buys Manor of Wedon Hill, Amersham

1593 Death of Richard Tothill leaving property in Buckinghamshire and Devon and house in Fleet Street. Son William Tothill, one of the Six Clerks in Chancery, inherits Wedon Hill Manor

1595 William Tothill purchases Shardeloes from Henry Fleetwood

1606 Birth of William son of Francis Drake of Esher, Surrey by his wife Joan, daughter of William Tothill

1624 A case was brought before the Committee for Priviledges and Returns of the House of Commons by William Hakewill of Lincoln’s Inn on behalf of the boroughs of Amersham, Wendover and Marlow seeking the restoration of their right to send two representatives to Parliament last excercised in the year 1309. The case was upheld on the grounds that the boroughs had failed to send representatives due to poverty alone and in the election of 1624, William Hakewill and John Crewe were returned for Amersham

1624 William Tothill negotiating with Lord Russell for the purchase of the manor of Amersham. Sale particulars 16 May 1624. The 148 freehold tenants would each have a vote. 25 copyhold tenants.

1625 Francis Drake M.P. for Amersham.

1625 Death of Joane Drake, wife of Francis Drake and dau & coheir of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham

1626 Death of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham 10 December 1626. Heirs grandson William son of Francis Drake, and dau Catherine Tothill

Francis Drake ( -1633)


1606 Birth of William son of Francis Drake of Esher, Surrey by his wife Joan, daughter of William Tothill

1625 Francis Drake M.P. for Amersham

1625 Death of Joane Drake, wife of Francis Drake and dau & coheir of William Tothill of Shardeloes bur at Amersham

1633 Death of Francis Drake Esq of Esher, Surrey, Gent of Privy Chamber to James I bur at Walton on Thames

William Drake (1606-1669)


bibliophile & classical scholar took little active part in in politics

1606 28 Sept Baptism of William son of Francis Drake of Esher, Surrey by his wife Joan, daughter of William Tothill

1630 William Drake M.P. for Amersham

1632 Catherine Tothill renounces right to Shardeloes in favour of her nephew William Drake

1637 2 May D/DRD/2/22

1) Rt Hon Francis Earl of Bedford
Rt Hon Sir William Russell Kt son & heir apparent

2) William Drake of Shardeloes Amersham Esq

£7,500

All that the lordship or Manor of Amersham .... in the said County of Bucks and in the County of Herts .... and also all those woods coppices and soil of wood .... situate lying and being in the parish of Amersham and Beaconsfield .... and called or known by the several name or names of

Bramford Wood 50 acres
Puddyfoote Spring 30 acres
Hills Wood 30 acres
Hillfield Grove 24 acres
Hillfield Spring 12 acres
Earls Wood 12 acres
Wood adjoining Earls Wood 11 acres
Beeshen Wood 8 acres

And also all those waste grounds .... lying and being in the parishes and hamlets of Amersham and Beaconsfield .... called....

Coltshill Green
Wickham Heath
Westwood
Amersham Heath

Now or late being in the tenure or occ of the Earl of Bedford

And also all that the site capital messuage or manor house of Amersham .... called the Bury together with all and every the houses edifices buildings barns stables dovehouses yards orchards gardens lands tenements meadows leasows pastures feedings and arable lands .... situate lying and being in the town fields parishes and hamlts of Amersham and Beaconsfield .... now or late in the tenure or occupation of Sir Thomas Sanders Kt and Francis Sanders his brother or either of them and to them demised .... by the said Earl by indenture bearing date 12 July in the ninth year of his said majesty (1634) for their lives under the yearly rent of 84 quarters of good sufficient and reasonable mault

Stockings farm in occ Walter son of Henry Tredway gent deceased leased to the said Henry by Edward Earl of Bedford 15 May 16 James I for 90 years or lives of the said Walter Tredway Daniel Readinge and Henry Wyngfield at £9 p.a.

Water mill in Amersham late in the occupation of Tobias Sanders together with a messuage barns stables and outhouses to the said mill adjoining .... with all leasowes pastures and one meadow contaning 3 acres leased by the said Edward Earl of Bedford to said Tobias Sanders, Henry Watkins and Bridgett Watkins 10 Nov 12 Jas I 3 life lease at £6 p.a.

Also messuage and tenement in Amersham in the tenure of Thomas Daye leased by Francis Earl of Bedford to Thomas Daye 26 Nov 5 Chas I 16 yrs at £5 p.a.

Messuage or tenement in the occupation of Henry Greenwood Francis Earl of Bedford to Henry Greenwood 24 Nov 10 Chas I £1 p.a.

1641 Sir William Drake created a baronet

1649 Sir William Drake in Italy until 1660. Leases 150 acres to James Perrott his steward on condition he provided diet for three people including Sir William's invalid aunt Catherine Tothill

1652 Made Chirographer of the Common Pleas (probably exercised by a deputy)

1657 Sir William Drake of Shardeloes builds six almshouses at Amersham

1661 Returned to Parliament forAmersham. Retained seat until his death

1669 Death of Sir William Drake of Shardeloes bur at Amersham Succeeded by nephew William Drake, son of brother Francis Drake of Walton on Thames

William Drake ( -1690)


Married Elizabeth second dau & heir of Sir William Montague Knt Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer

1661 William Drake M.P. for Amersham (Said to have been “under the command of his father- in-law”) Remained M.P. till death in 1690.

1682 Market Hall built by Sir William Drake of Shardeloes

1690 Death of Sir William Drake of Shardeloes bur at Amersham

Montague Drake (1673-1698)


Married Jane dau and heir of Sir John Garrard 3rd Bart M.P. of Larner, herts

1695 Montague Drake M.P. for Amersham

1698 Death of Montague Drake bur at Amersham

Montague Garrard Drake (1692-1728)


Tory

1692 14 Oct Birth of Montague Garrard Drake, son of Montague Drake of Shardeloes by Jane dau and heir of Sir John Garrard 3rd Bart M.P. of Larner, Herts

1713 M.P. for Amersham till 1722

1719 13 Oct Married Isabella dau and heir of Thomas Marshall of London merchant

1722 M.P. for Buckinghamshire till 1727

1727 M.P. for Amersham 1727 till death in 1728

1728 April Death of Monatague Garrard Drake

William Drake 1723-1796


Tory. No recorded speeches in House of commons

1723 12 May Birth of William son of Montague Garrard Drake by Isabella dau and heir of Thomas Marshall of London merchant

1746 26 Feb Returned as M.P. for Amersham. Served until his death in 1796.

1747 9 Feb Married Elizabeth daughter and heir of John Raworth director of South Sea Co.
£100,000

William Drake 1747-1795


Independent. Frequent speaker in House of Commons

1747 Birth of William son of William Drake by Elizabeth daughter and heir of John Raworth

1768 Represented Amersham until his death in 1795. Reputed by the Public Ledger to be “a very independent, conscientious man, votes on each side but most usually in the minority”. He spoke frequently in a loud voice, generally advocating caution in public expenditure

1795 18 May Death of William Drake. The Gentleman’s Magazine reported that “He has left an immense property partly aquired by marriage, and partly by some collateral branches. Had he lived to inherit that of his father, he would have been one of the richest men in the country”.

 

Pubs

ANGEL INN


1653 25 Nov D/DRD/2/29

1) Susanna Newman one of daus of Mary Newman late of Amersham widow
2) William Drake of Shardeloes Knight
£86
All that messuage or tenement with appurts now used for a victualling house called or known by the name or sign of the Chequer situate and being in Amersham aforesaid adjoining to the messuage or tenement called the Angel on the one side and to a messuage now or late of George Ball on the other side
And also one orchard or meadow platt thereunto adjoining and belonging lying and being in Amersham aforesaid containing by estimation 3 roods be it more or less and now in the tenure of the said George Ball
And also all that other messuage or tenement with appurts situate and being in Amersham aforesaid adjoining to the further end of the said orchard or meadow platt
Endorsed Mrs Newmans conveyance of the Chequer Inn in Whielden Street
1674 Rental
Timothy Sanders for the Angell Inn orchard & meadow £7 0s 0d
1692 Ledger Edward Leared:
House formerly the Angel, ground adjoining to it, and a mead of 6 acres £29
1696 Ledger John Costard
That which was the Angell in Amersham with the Orchard and a part of the
Berry Field £12
1698 Rent Book D/DR/2/18 q
p 49 1698-1702 John Costard
That which was the Angel Inn in Amersham with his orchard and a part of Berry Field
Half years rent £12
1702-1707 William Hopper for the same house and land
1720 8 Feb. Will of William Hopper of Amersham lace buyer
Leaves to son Henry Hopper:
All that Messuage or Tenement with the appurtenances wherein I now dwell together with the outhouses edifices buildings barns stables yards orchards gardens and backsides thereto belonging
And also that close or parcel of arable land called the Berry Field adjoining to the orchard of or belonging to the said messuage contaning by estimation 4 acres .... held by lease of Montague Garrard Drake Esq at the yearly rent of £57
Proved 9 May 1721

 

BELL INN

1706     Elizabeth son of John Hopper victualler bapt
1724     Recognizances Victuallers of Amersham 

            Quarter Sessions
            John Child of Amersham victualler surety for them all including John Hopper

1736                                     D/DR/2/71
        Deeds to messuage in High Street in the occupation of John Hopper called the     Bell adjoining to Copt Hall and forming part of it from Richard Lovett 1736

1736                                         D/DRD/2/74
        Cottage called Copt or Copped Hall two cottages near to it in occ Widow Hill and William Almond and newly erected brick cottage adjoining in occ Lancelot Arnold
1739     Quit Rental
    Henry Marshall Esq Mrs Drake Lancelot Arnold and John Hopper for house    6d
1742     Map 55-56
1753     Alehouse recogniscences  Edward Pearcy 1753-1757

N.B. no further Alehouse recogniscences

 

 BLACK HORSE

1776     John Dean
1780     Faith Dean
1785     John Dean
1798     Posse Comitatus Amersham Woodside
            John Dean Publican
1801     Sarah Dean
1824     Marked on Bryants map
1824     Francis Edge
1839     Tithe 112  Owner: John & William Weller
             Occ: Joseph Putnam
1851     Census  Amersham Common
                Joseph Putman 49 Victualler
1872     Weller: George Line
1880     O.S. Map marked as Black Horse P.H.
1893     Licence transferred to the  Station Hotel

 

Catherine Wheel,

 

1734 D/DR/2/184 Deeds to two messuages one called the Catherine Wheel John Ware to Joshua Parsons

1753 John Foster 1753-1766

1767 Esther Foster widow 1767-1768

 

Chequers Inn, Whielden Street

1653 25 Nov                        D/DRD/2/29

    1) Susanna Newman one of daus of Mary Newman late of Amersham widow
    2) William Drake of Shardeloes Knight

    £86

    All that messuage or tenement with appurts now used for a victualling house called or     known by the name or sign of the Chequer situate and being in Amersham aforesaid     adjoining to the messuage or tenement called the Angel on the one side and to a messuage     now or late of George Ball on the other side
    And also one orchard or meadow platt thereunto adjoining and belonging lying and being in     Amersham aforesaid containing by estimation 3 roods be it more or less and now in the     tenure of the said George Ball
    And also all that other messuage or tenement with appurts situate and being in Amersham     aforesaid adjoining to the further end of the said orchard or meadow platt

    Endorsed Mrs Newmans conveyance of the Chequer Inn in Whielden Street

1692 Rental

    James Nash
    Tenement near the Chequer in Whilding
   
    John Wingfield:
    Farm called Denterhold Land                    £28   0  0
    House called Hell where he dwells by the Saracens Head            £8 10  0
    Chequer alehouse let by him to Webb                 4 10  0

1723 Rental                            D/DR/2/26
    John Webb for the Chequer £2 14s 0d

Chequers Inn, Bury End

 1756 Thomas Boddington
1760 Hannah Boddington
1761 Joseph Deering
1770 Matthew Line
1777  Sun insurance 378703                     11936/254
                                        £
Matthew Line of Amersham co Bucks victualler

On his household goods in his now dwelling house only situate
as aforesaid brick & tiled     45
Utensils & Stock therein       50
                                        ___
                                        95
                __________________

1783 Land Tax Amersham Woodside
    Owner: Mr Wm Child  Occ: Matt Line        11s 0d
1793 John Ayres
1800 Land Tax Amersham Woodside
    Owner: Exec of Wm Child  Occ: John Ayres    11s 0d
1807 Samuel Cawdery
1839 Tithe Award John & William Weller
    433 Thomas Putnam  Chequers Inn & garden
1851 Census Thomas Putnam 54 Innkeeper
1872 Return of Public Houses
    Chequers Over 50 Years Owner Messrs Weller, Amersham
    Occ: Thomas William Axten

 Crown Inn

 1696 Assessment James child for the Crown £1 18s 0d
1708 Deposition of witnesses taken at the house of James Childs called and known by the name and sign of the Crown in Amersham in the 7th year of Queen Anne, 1708
1739 Quit Rental
    Henry Marshall Esq, Mrs Tipping, Mrs Dickson, John Child butcher:
    William Eeles for the Crown Inn and Orchard  Quit Rent 3s 1d
1739                            D/DRD/2/85
    1)  John Child
    2)  Isabella Drake
    Recites division between four daughters of John Cheesman of Amersham innholder     deceased
    1/4 part of Capital messuage called the Crown in occ William Eeles or his assigns
1742 Map 117
1753 Charles Fowler
1755 Charles Fowler the younger
1765 Window Tax 29 lights
1776 Moiety of Crown Inn from John Lawrence        D/DRD/2/85
    Late in tenure of William Eles now of Charles Fowler
1783 Katherine Fowler
1783 Land Tax Amersham Town
    Wm Drake Esq: Katherine Fowler        £2 4s 0d
1784 John Fowler
1789    Account for bricklayers work done for Wm Drake Esq at the Crown Inn by Samuel Maycock
1790 ? William Weller married Katherine Fowler
1792 Directory “.... good accommodation.” [John] Fowler
1798 Posse Comitatus
    John Fowler victualler Amersham Town
    10 horses 2 wagons 3 carts
1824 Charles White Fowler
1830 Directory  Crown, Charles White Fowler (& wine and brandy merchant) High Street
1839 Tithe Award Thomas Tyrwhitt Drake: William Wilson
                            Francis Priest
    530-1 Crown Inn Yard Garden and House
1851 Census Crown Inn  William Wilson 42 innkeeper
1851 Census Crown Inn
    Thomas Bown 46 innkeeper
1872 Public Houses
    Crown Owner T T Drake; Occ: William George
1881 Census  William George 57 victualler & farmer
1891 Directory Collins, Alfred George Crown Hotel High Street
1903 Directory Read, Frederick Crown family & commercial hotel, High Street
1910 Valuation Drake, W W T: Read, Frederick Crown P.H. High street
1928 Drake Sale Catalogue
    Let to Trust Houses Ltd

 

Dove Inn 

1753 William Moerton

1756 William Morton

See Old Griffin

 

Eagle Inn (145 High Street)

1728 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Abraham Benning    0s 6d
1735 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Wm Nevett: Wm Nevett    0s 6d

1743 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Widow Nevett: Widow Nevett    0s 6d

1761 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Eliz & Martha Hobbs: William Woodbridge & Lazarus Pratt    0s 6d

1771Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Martha Hobbs: Wm Woodbridge & Laz Pratt    0s 6d
1783 Land Tax
    Henry Woodbridge: Wm Shrimpton        6s 0d
    Henry Woodbridge: Wm Woodbridge        4s 0d
1785 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Martha Woodbridge: Wm Woodbridge & Wm Shrimpton    0s 6d
1800 Land Tax
    Walker: Herself & William Only        10s 0d
1810 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Late Jane Walker widow: Wm Dimes and Nathaniel Birch late himself & Wm Olney 0s 6d

1831 Land tax
    Daniel Field: self        House        4s 0d
    Mrs Axten: Mary Gwilliam     House        6s 0d
1839 Tithe Award
    486 John & William Weller: Charles Hailey    house & garden
1851 Census William Climpson 29 labourer chair maker
    William Wheeler 31 brewers labourer
1856 Beerhouse licence
1872 Owner: Messrs Weller, Amersham
    Occ: Henry A Rogers
1891 Census The Eagle Beerhouse
    Joseph Aylett 42 publican
1939 Eagle P.H. (Chas MacDonald) High St
1941 Macdonald, Charles beer retailer
1952 The Eagle licensee W Phillips
2000- 2008 Still a pub


Elephant and Castle (97 High Street)

1728 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Ed Child sen or Jos Nash    1s 9 1/2d
    Wid Todd & Mrs Tanner    1s 9 1/2d

1729 Amersham Rectory Court Rolls

    ..... Hunphreys who held freely of the lord of the manor two messuages or tenements now in three tenements in the possession or occupation of Joseph Nash ....Todd widow and Henry Hobbs at 3s 7d rent has alienated the same to Thomas Todd

1735 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Thos Todd Humphreys: Jos Nash John Todd & Rich Wid Todd & Wid Tanner 3s 7d
1743 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Rich Todd: Joseph Nash John Todd & Rich Todd        3s 7d
1761 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Mary Parsons: Jos Nash Jos Climpson & Eliz Todd        3s 7d
1771 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Mary Parsons: Jos Nash Wm Gates & Eliz Todd        3s 7d
1783 Land Tax     Mrs Mary Parsons: James Line        8s 0d
1785 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Mary Parsons: James Line Wm Berry & Thos Humphreys    3s 7d
1792 Directory Priest, Francis grocer
        Priest Francis cordwainer
1800 Land Tax  William Statham: Francis Priest    8s 0d
1810 Amersham Rectory Quit Rental
    Wm Spratley late Wm Statham part of 3s 7d: himself late Francis Priest jun 1s 0d
    John Statham late ditto: William Berry Daniel Hatch late John Salter & Benj Hoare late     Wm Clarke                                2s 7d
1830 Beerhouse licence
1831 Land Tax    William Spratley: self  8s 0d
1847 Directory  Spratley, William beer retailer & butcher, High street
1869 Directory, Dumbarton, Henry butcher high Street
1872 Owner: Wethered Occ: Henry Dumbarton
1883 Directory, Dumbarton, Henry butcher high Street
1903 Directory Dumbarton, William Henry butcher High Street and Childs Farm Woodrow
2000 Still a pub


 

Amersham on the Hill - Developers

This information appears here with the kind permission of Julian Hunt . It is data collected in preparation for his publication A History of Amersham

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Ashley Green

Introduction

Church: St John the Evangelist

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 497205

Grid Ref SP970050 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ashley Green PARISH St John the Evangelist
Leigh NAMES name for Lye Green in 1766
Grove (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Lye Green PLACE within the parish
Pressmore (Fm) PLACE within the parish
The Thorne PLACE within the parish
Whelpley Hill PLACE within the parish

 


Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 559
1811 471
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 536
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 587
1921 595
1931 684
1941 N/A
1951 682
1961 897
1971 1088
1981 940
1991 961

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Ashley Green   St John the Evangelist   Baptisms   1876   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Ashley Green   St John the Evangelist   Marriages   1876   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GARDNER SMITH PUDDEPHATT PUDDEPHATT
2 GROVER BATCHELOR REDDING SMITH
3 WETHERED PUDDEPHATT JUDGE REDDING
4 WARE GEARY CHAPMAN BATCHELOR
5 SALE BALDWIN BAIL GARDNER
6 DARVILL WARE WOODS WARE
7 POWELL NASH CHARGE GEARY
8 FOARD WATERTON BROWN JUDGE
9 DELL PUTNAM BRACKLEY BALDWIN
10 TWITCHELL HOW WRIGHT NASH

 

Description

Description

The village of Ashley Green is situated on the B416 road running from Berkhamsted to Chesham. It is one of the typical Chiltern villages, consisting of a long 'green', with a church, post office/ shop, village hall and public house. Unfortunately, it is dissected by the main road.

The soil is clay, in chalk flints, and there are many underground rivers and streams in the area. There are also underground sandstone caves in the village. These are filled with water most of the year round it is supposed, and no one seems to know where the entrance to the caves is, although it is strongly suspected that the entrance is in a small area near the green, now owned by the Water Board. It is also thought that from the caves leads a passageway to Berkhamsted Castle.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Whelpley

Whelpley Hill

The Romans made a camp on the hill now known as Whelpley Hill, situated high up on the edge of the Chilterns. The Romans moved on and for a while the little place slumbered. Later a little hamlet developed. Through all the changes in the following centuries the little hamlet has survived.

A major change to the village's traditional way of life came with the Second World War. Our menfolk took up arms and uniforms joining the defence volunteers. Evacuees were made welcome and quickly absorbed into village life. Everyone at home was busily involved in first aid classes, fitting gas masks and raising money for the war effort. Then, suddenly, there came the bulldozers carving huge swathes through the standing corn. Unbelievably, we heard that our village was to become part of an airfield. Large areas of concrete were laid criss-crossing the village. What was happening? It looked as if we were to be cut off from the outside world. Barriers were erected at each end of the village but we were told we would be issued with passes to allow us to leave and enter. So the villagers watched and waited.
A few weeks later some American servicemen arrived to prepare the area for operation as a bomber airfield. On a sunny afternoon we watched the arrival of the 'Flying Fortresses' which, after landing, moved to their dispersal points, four of them only fifty yards away from our Village Hall. The local lads soon adopted their favourite plane, for each had a name painted on the side, such as Yankee Doodle, Friday the 13th, Memphis Belle, Johnny Reb and Bad Penny to name but a few. Friendly relations between the crews and villagers soon developed, especially in our Village Hall. We danced and we sang together. It was our boast that we never had any trouble. Preparations went on apace for bombing operations. Each morning at dawn we were awakened by the roar of engines as the aircraft were readied for take off for that day's target. Some did not return, their parking place empty. The village mourned. Many well known faces appeared around the village, Clark Gable, Glen Miller, Bob Hope, James Stewart and William Holden, to name a few.

In September 1944 the bombers left the airfield, their places taken over by the Air Transport Service, whose task it was to return the American servicemen to the U.S.A. In a few months the war ended. The village gradually settled down to its normal quiet ways. Concrete dispersals and runways fell into disuse. The barriers were down. The land was eventually given back to the farmers.

Only the old runways remain, weeds and scrub growing freely between the cracks where so much action had taken place. Is it all in the past or does something still remain? Newcomers to the village walking their dogs in the area have experienced a feeling of a 'presence'. Their animals bristle and howl and sometimes run away home. Their owners cannot account for it. Is there something? Who knows? For many of those airmen leaving this airfield on their deadly missions, it was to be their last contact in this world. It makes one think!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Notes

Notes

The ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1875 with the building of St John the Evangelist. A building of flint with stone dressings, the church was paid for by Miss Dorrien. The civil parish of Ashley Green was formed out of the civil parish of Chesham on the 1st April 1897. One of the main families in the early period of the parish is the Smith-Dorrien family

Chalfont St Giles

Introduction

Church: St Giles

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 3726

Easting & Northing: 498193

Grid Ref SU980930 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Chalfont St.Giles PARISH St Giles
Boderellis Close NAMES name for Bottrell's Farm in 1505
Celfunde NAMES name for Chalfont in Domesday Book in 1086
Celfunte NAMES name for Chalfont in Domesday Book in 1086
Chalfounte NAMES name for Chalfont in 1535
Charlfont NAMES name for Charlfont in 1766
Chawfount NAMES name for Chalfont in 1538
Jurdens NAMES name for Jordans in 1766
Row Wood NAMES name for Roughwood Park in 1826
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1669. New building in 1854
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1835
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Jordans. First Mentioned: 1669
Austens PLACE within the parish
Boastridge PLACE within the parish
Goldhill PLACE within the parish
Grove (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Jordans PLACE within the parish
Maltmans Green PLACE within the parish
Newland Park PLACE within the parish
Outfield (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Roughwood Park PLACE within the parish
The Vache PLACE within the parish
Three Households PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 762
1811 924
1821 1104
1831 1297
1841 1228
1851 1169
1861 1217
1871 1243
1881 1264
1891 1286
1901 1362
1911 1762
1921 2074
1931 2882
1941 N/A
1951 4381
1961 5927
1971 7118
1981 7004
1991 6601

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chalfont St Giles   St Giles   Baptisms   1576   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chalfont St Giles   St Giles   Marriages   1576   1910   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chalfont St Giles   St Giles   Burials   1584   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Chalfont St Giles     Infants     Chalfont St Giles     1873     1897         Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles         Chalfont St Giles     1873     1893         Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles         Chalfont St Giles     1873     1890     Yes     Admissions Register
    Chalfont St Giles     Girls     Chalfont St Giles     1881     1898         Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles     Girls     Chalfont St Giles     1890     1921     Yes     Admissions Register
    Chalfont St Giles     Infants     Chalfont St Giles     1890     1908         Admissions Register
    Chalfont St Giles     Boys     Chalfont St Giles     1893     1919         Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles     Infants     Chalfont St Giles     1897     1931     Yes     Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles     Girls     Chalfont St Giles     1899     1906         Logbook
    Chalfont St Giles     boys     Chalfont St Giles     1891     1921         Admissions Register

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 KIBBLE HILL CLARK CLARK
2 DUNTON BODDY HEARNE SAUNDERS
3 GRIMSDALE COCK SAUNDERS HILL
4 RUSSELL NASH KEEN WORLEY
5 GRIMSDALL GREEN REED HEARNE
6 NASH SMITH WORLEY KEEN
7 EWER WORLEY EDWARDS REED
8 EVERED KIBBLE CHAPMAN CHAPMAN
9 CRAFFORD CLARK CRAFT CARTER
10 BODY BUCKMASTER CARTER CRAFT

Description

Chalfont St Giles lies about a quarter of a mile from the A413 about three miles south east of Amersham. This distance from the main road has helped to preserve its identity as a village with church, pond and village green surrounded by cottages. It has a recorded Roman road running through it, so has nearly 2,000 years of history. It is, in fact, a fine example of the development of an English village through the ages.

The church was built in Norman times and the dedication to St  Giles may possibly refer to the beechwoods that once covered the surrounding hills, St Giles being the patron saint of woodlands as well as the sick, poor, lepers and cripples. The east window of the church is said to have been damaged by Cromwell's cannon stationed in Stone Meadow while Cromwell himself was lodged at Stone House. The river Misbourne flows through Stone Meadow and local folklore has it that if it stops flowing it foretells disaster.

The principal great house of St Giles is The Vache, a very ancient manor house. The de la Vache's, the owners of the manor may well have brought the name with them from Normandy when they came to England with William the Conqueror and took possession of the estate. The property passed later to Thomas Fleetwood, Master of the Mint to Queen Elizabeth I, and was held by that family until George Fleetwood, one of the judges of Charles I, was evicted from the property after the Restoration in 1660. The Vache estate is now owned and occupied by the British Coal Board.

Between St Giles and St Peters on the north side of the Misbourne valley is another great house, Newlands Park. It was constructed by a Georgian banker, Abraham Newlands, who eventually became Chief Cashier of the Bank of England. At that time all bank notes were signed by hand and since Mr Newland's signature appeared on £5 notes they were popularly known as 'Newlands'.

Chalfont St Giles is principally known for Milton's cottage, although it was never owned by him. When the Plague came to London in 1665 John Milton asked his friend and former pupil, Thomas Ellwood to find him a refuge. Ellwood rented the cottage on Milton's behalf but could not be on hand to welcome Milton and his family to the cottage because he was in prison for being a Quaker. He was released from prison while Milton was still at the cottage and visited him there. Milton is said to have handed him the manuscript of Paradise Lost which he had just completed, asking for his opinion. On returning the manuscript Ellwood said 'Thou has said much here about Paradise lost, but what has thou to say of Paradise found?' Legend relates that after the Plague Milton returned to London and wrote Paradise Regained. The cottage is now the only existing building in which Milton is known to have lived. It was purchased by public subscription in 1887 in honour of Queen Victoria's Jubilee, the Queen heading the list with a donation of £20.
On the hillside above Chalfont St Giles is an obelisk some 60 feet high made of flintstones with the corners strengthened with brick. Although the obelisk itself gives no clue as to why it is there, local legend has it that at this spot King George III, being out hunting and separated from his attendants by a sudden fog, accosted a yokel and asked where he was. The yokel replied that 'Peters is down there and Giles over yonder but this 'ere ain't rightly a place at all'. To which the King replied 'we will make it a place then'. He had the obelisk erected to mark the spot.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Jordans

About a mile across the fields from Seer Green lies the village of Jordans which takes its name from 'Old Jordans', the farm where Quaker farmers lived in the 17th century.
Jordans village originated when some land became available in 1915-16. A small number of members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) saw an opportunity to establish a village and community where artisans and others could apply their skills for the benefit of the community. Jordans Village Industries was formed, but alas, was not a successful venture and went into voluntary liquidation in 1923.

The village was designed to surround a green; building began in 1919 and commemorative bricks were laid under the first house on February 15 th of that year, and on the nearest Friday to that date, a great supper is held, attended by as many of the tenants as possible. Building continued until 1923, by which time cottages were built round the Green and a number of single houses, all of which are rented on monthly tenancies. The management of the village estate is vested in a committee of 12 members — eight elected by shareholders, three from what is called Tenant Members Committee and one from the Society of Friends.
The Old Jordans farm house was bought by the Society of Friends and is now run as a Guest House and Conference Centre. In the grounds is the Mayflower Barn, reputed to be built of the timbers of the Mayflower which carried the Pilgrim Fathers to America. This barn is used in the summer for concerts and many other events.

On the road to Beaconsfield is the Friends Meeting House, built in 1688. In the graveyard, among many other early Quakers, lies the remains of William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania.

In the inevitable progress brought about by time, the nature of the village has modified, though much of the old spirit remains, and during the course of the year, many visitors come to visit the historic Meeting House and enjoy the lovely countryside around.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Chalfont St Giles from J. J. Sheahan in 1861.

This parish extends over 3,641 acres, and contains 1,217 persons. Rateable value, £4,623. The soil is gravelly with a subsoil of chalk at various depths, and is considered poor. The surface is undulated. The village is situated near the Misbourne stream, in a very secluded spot in a valley, 3.75 miles S.E. from Amersham, 4 miles N.W. from Gerrard's Cross; and 4 miles N.E. from Beaconsfield. A fair for pleasure is held here on the 22nd of June.

William Moreton, Esq., the Rev.Edward Moore, Mrs Priestley, and Mrs Main, are the other principal landowners in the parish.

The Church (St. Giles) stands on very low ground, and the building is an intermixture of flint, brick, and stone, chequered. Its component parts are a nave and chancel, with north and south aisles, and a tower at the west end. The tower is embattled and contains six bells. The building is principally in the Decorated and Perpendicular styles.

Education

Chalfont Saint Giles, Parish (Pop. 1,297)

A small Daily School (commenced 1826) in which 3 males and 6 females are instructed at the expense of their parents

Two Day and Sunday National Schools, attended by 73 males and 57 females
daily, and 78 males and 79 females on Sundays; both are endowed, but the funds being insufficient, they are further supported by voluntary contributions, and small weekly payments from the children. The master's salary is £40 per annum, with a house to reside in; the mistress's £20 with an allowance of £8 for house rent; in addition to which they have annual gratuities of £5, and £4 each, if the state of their respective Schools gives satisfaction to the visitor.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Chalfont St Peter

Introduction

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres): 4758

Easting & Northing: 500190

Grid Ref TQ000900 Click to see map

Names

Places

NameTypeNote
Chalfont St.Peter PARISH St Peter
Celfunde NAMES name for Chalfont in Domesday Book in 1086
Celfunte NAMES name for Chalfont in Domesday Book in 1086
Chalfounte NAMES name for Chalfont in 1535
Charlfont NAMES name for Charlfont in 1766
Chawfount NAMES name for Chalfont in 1538
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Gold Hill. First Mentioned: 1870
Austenwood PLACE within the pariah
Gerrards Cross (Part) PLACE hamlet in parish until 1861
St Paul, Horn Hill PLACE Victorian Chapel of Ease with 40 places.
Stampwell (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1174
1811 1153
1821 1351
1831 1416
1841 1483
1851 1482
1861 1344
1871 1459
1881 1456
1891 1509
1901 1753
1911 2802
1921 4183
1931 6217
1941 N/A
1951 8114
1961 12460
1971 14498
1981 13027
1991 12669

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Chalfont St Peter   St Peter   Baptisms   1539   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chapel of St Peter   Gold Hill   Baptisms   1791   1836   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chalfont St Peter   St Peter   Marriages   1538   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Chalfont St Peter   St Peter   Burials   1584   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RANDALL HUNT NEWMAN HUNT
2 TREDWAY WORLEY HUNT NEWMAN
3 BROWNE NEWMAN ALDERMAN HILL
4 DELL SMITH HILL ALDERMAN
5 BUTTERFIELD BENNETT EDWARDS EDWARDS
6 BABBE FRANKLIN HEATH WORLEY
7 SMITH GURNEY LESLIE HATCH
8 EWER NASH DANCER SMITH
9 MUNKE HATCH JONES JONES
10 DOWNES EDWARDS HATCH JOHNSON

 

Description

Chalfont St Peter is a village and parish on the main road, A413, from London to Aylesbury. It lies in a valley on the spur of the Chiltern Hills. The river Misbourne runs through the middle of the main village street, now culverted in the shopping area.

This was an agricultural area, but much has changed since the population exploded. This grew tenfold in 100 years from 1,456 in 1881 to 14,498 in 1981, the latest census year, and certainly much more by 1986.
The village street was very pretty, with some early 16th century buildings of rare and distinctive architecture. These included two very rare brick-built, half-timbered cottages which we called Wingfields.

The parish church of St Peter, in the diocese of Oxford, stands in the centre with the churchyard flanking the road. The church is a red brick and stone building with a fine tower. The present building was re-erected in 1708, the previous one having collapsed.

The Greyhound Inn, a striking red-brick building, had an imposing coach entrance. Sadly, this has been infilled of recent years. This was a stop for the stage coaches in the 18 th and early 19th centuries. The infamous Judge Jeffreys held court here when he lived at The Grange, a short distance away.
The George Inn, a cream washed building, stands facing the parish church. This still retains its coach entrance. A notice over a low door states: 'Duck or Grouse'! Alongside the inn a large modern shopping centre, with car park, has risen from the ruins of the 16th century 'Barrack Yard'.

The Grange is a charming house, built on the site of a former imposing residence and is steeped in history. Here was once the home of the infamous Judge Jeffreys and is now the Holy Cross Convent, a boarding and day school for girls.
The Cottage Hospital, its early title, was built in 1871 and was the gift of the Hibberts of Chalfont Park, with initially six beds and one cot. Now there are over 30 beds and, through the generosity of the public, outpatients and physiotherapy departments, a new X-ray department, day rooms and many other amenities have been added. It is now named The Chalfonts and Gerrards Cross Hospital and serves several parishes.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

I was born in Chalfont St Peter in 1902 and remember well conditions before the First World War. The milk was delivered to my home by a man who carried a heavy can, with half pint and pint measures suspended inside the can. We came to the door with a jug for twice-daily deliveries and once on Sunday. If we needed milk on Sunday afternoon, we collected it from the farm.
Mr Keys was the postmaster and he also ran a grocery business on the same premises. Mr Mills had a bakery and sold both bread and groceries in his shop. Mr Brown sold groceries, hardware and paraffin oil (no oil to be sold after dark!). Mr Bonsey kept The George and he also had a butcher's shop, now the saloon bar. At the rear of The George was a slaughterhouse where cattle were brought on foot controlled by a dog and a man (or often a boy), from Watford cattle market (ten miles away) and Slough (six miles). Mr Stone also had a bakery and confectioner's shop. Mr Dell was the carrier "to and from London twice per week”, and Mr Bastin “to and from Uxbridge daily”.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "Buckinghamshire Within Living Memory" (1993) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

The River Misbourne once flowed over the main road   at one point and was known as 'the splash'. Horses and carts paused here to be washed down. When the first cars came they often got stuck in the splash and the local lads would call out, 'Push you out for a penny, Sir'. At times the houses were flooded and on one occasion the customers were marooned in a pub. A foot-bridge was built and eventually by 1968 the River Misbourne had competely disappeared under a shopping precinct and parking space with flats above.
The London to Aylesbury coach stopped every five miles and as a coaching stop Chalfont St Peter was a village of pubs. Several have been demolished in the last twenty years, but the Greyhound, visited once by Sir Winston Churchill on his way to Chequers from No 10 still stands. A few years ago a grand archway through which the coach and horses passed, was blocked up and made into a dining room.

When the first buses came, their route could be changed without warning because the driver went wherever the majority of passengers wished and stopped at their own front gates. The fare to London was- half a crown.

There have always been gravel pits in the area, many now filled in and built on. A local pig farmer was  distressed when because of swine fever his animals had to be destroyed, but while digging graves for them he found gravel and made more money than he ever had on pigs.

Phyllis Warden, Chalfont St Peter

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Horn Hill


Horn Hill was meant to have been a model village and, where the Hall now stands, there were at the turn of the century, six picturesque cottages but without 'mod-cons'. Mr H. D. Harben, the then Chairman of the Prudential, bought Newland Park and much of the adjoining land, farms, and above-mentioned six cottages.
On inspecting his agent's book, he saw that one cottage was rented by someone and found it to be a young man who used it in the week-nights for a games and reading room for the youth of the locality and, on Sundays, for a Sunday School and evening service. He refused to take more rent and said that he would build a suitable building for the Sunday work and a recreation room. It meant the demolition of the cottages, and, firstly, he built 12 cottages in three blocks of four higher up in Roberts Lane, and as a temporary measure, let the young man have rent-free a cottage he owned up Rickmansworth Lane. He intended making a model village of the whole area, but alas he died in 1910 before completion of the Hall. The Village Hall was being built on the site where had stood the six cottages opposite the small church - St Paul's - a Chapel of Ease.

Mr Eric Harben, his son, had the Hall completed and he opened it in 1911. Mr Harben was a barrister and he drew up the rules for the running of the Hall. Unfortunately, the First World War made it impossible for Mr Harben to carry on living at Newland Park, so that the model village his father had envisaged did not come to pass. So many people have wondered why such an outstanding building is found in such a rural setting, and one wonders what Horn Hill would have been like had Mr Henry Harben lived and had fulfilled his dream. The first 12 cottages were the beginning of the dream, and the Village Hall was and is a monument to his memory.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Chalfont St Peter from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish is about thirteen miles in compass, and contains 4,717 acres. Population, 1343; rateable value, £5,751. The soil consists of chalk and brick earth, interspersed with numerous flints. The Misse, or Misbourne stream runs through the parish, about three miles from north to south. A great portion of Gerrard's Cross Common is in this parish. The village is large and situated 5 miles N.E. from Beaconsfield, 5 miles S.S.E. from Amersham, and 5.5 miles N.N.E. from Uxbridge. There is a Fair for pedlary and toys on the 4th and 5th of September. At Durrants Heath is an earthenware pottery, and brick and tile manufactory.

Chalfont Park is on the verge of the turnpike road to London, and is a fine and extensive demesne, undulated and beautifully timbered. Here is an ash said to be the largest and most ancient ash-tree in England. It is 25 feet in circumference.

Education


Chalfont Saint Peter's, Parish (Pop. 1,416)

Two Daily Schools, in which about 24 males and 30 females are instructed, at the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday National School (commenced 1829), which is daily attended by 60 males and 36 females, and by 70 males and 45 females on Sundays; supported by subscription.

One Sunday School, of the Baptist denomination, in which 36 males and 45 females are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Astwood

Introduction

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Newport

Poor Law District: Newport Pagnell

Size (acres): 1286

Easting & Northing: 495247

Grid Ref SP950470 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Astwood PARISH St Peter
Estwood by Neuport Paynel NAMES name for Astwood in 1341
Astwood Bury PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 160
1811 209
1821 263
1831 268
1841 243
1851 268
1861 247
1871 268
1881 222
1891 187
1901 168
1911 140
1921 116
1931 127
1941 N/A
1951 113
1961 176
1971 157
1981 133
1991 131

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Astwood   St Peter   Baptisms   1667   1914   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Astwood   St Peter   Marriages   1575   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Astwood   St Peter   Burials   1666   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 KING WALKER WRIGHT WRIGHT
2 KILPIN BASS FLUTE FLUTE
3 HARTWELL KING HOBBS HOBBS
4 COLEMAN SHEFFIELD SANDERS HALL
5 REYNOLDS ODELL HALL SANDERS
6 INGERSHALL SMITH ROSS ROSS
7 SHEFFEILD HART BARCOCK BARCOCK
8 SMITH HOBBS DUNKLEY KING
9 PHILLIPS BRINKLOW HERBERT DUNKLEY
10 HIGGINS TATTAM DUDLEY ODELL

Notes

Astwood is a small parish on the Bedfordshire boarder, 5.5 miles north-east of Newport Pagnell. There are 1,281 acres in the parish with 47 inhabited house in 1891, this had dropped to 41 houses in 1901. The population in 1891 was 187 and dropped to 168 in 1901. There were 92 males in 1891 and 80 in 1901; while 95 females in 1891 and 88 in 1901.

Education

Astwood Parish (Pop. 268)

Two Sunday Schools, in one are 30 males and 35 females, who attend the Established Church, supported by T. A. Boswell, Esq., Lord of the Manor;
the other (commenced 1829), consists of 9 males and 18 females, supported by subscription appertaining to a congregation of Dissenters.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

Bledlow

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 4169

Easting & Northing: 477202

Grid Ref SP770020 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Bledlow PARISH Holy Trinity
Shingles Fm NAMES name for Shimmell's Farm in 1826
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Church End. First Mentioned: 1820
Bledlow Cross PLACE within the parish
Callow Down PLACE within the parish
Common Leys PLACE within the parish
Drewells (lost) PLACE within the parish
Forty Green PLACE within the parish
Olive Green PLACE within the parish
Pitch Green PLACE within the parish
Shimmels PLACE within the parish
The Ford PLACE within the parish
The Lyde PLACE within the parish
Winnall PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 917
1811 931
1821 1050
1831 1135
1841 1205
1851 1202
1861 1189
1871 1170
1881 1070
1891 978
1901 854
1911 954
1921 879
1931 925
1941 N/A
1951 1679
1961 1871
1971 1984
1981 2134
1991 2000

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1592   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Burials   1591   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS STEVENS SMITH STEVENS
2 SMITH EUSTACE BROOKS SMITH
3 SALE SALE STEVENS BROOKS
4 COSTARD TRIPP BRITNELL SALE
5 RAUNCE PRATT AVERY BRITNELL
6 TOWNE HOLT KEEN PRATT
7 BIGGE SMITH ALLEN GOMME
8 STEEVENS TURNER FOLLEY AVERY
9 CLARKE HARRIS WHITE EUSTACE
10 RANCE GOMME GOMME KEEN

Description

Bledlow is a conservation village and thus retains much of its original pattern. It now includes the hamlets of Skittle Green, Forty Green, Holly Green and Pitch Green all of which lie north of the busy B4009, the Lower Icknield Way.
Though the origins of the village can be traced to the 10th century, there is clear evidence of earlier occupation. Close to the Upper Icknield Way is a Bronze Age barrow known locally as 'The Cop' which was excavated in 1938. One mile south of the village is Bledlow Cross, carved out of the Chiltern Ridge by the Anglo-Saxons and, with its neighbour Whiteleaf Cross, are the only turf-cut crosses in the country.

After the Norman Conquest, William I granted the Manor of Bledlow to his half-brother Robert, who held it in 1086. In the reign of Henry VI it was granted to Eton College but in 1650 James Blanck became owner and he built the original Manor House. Records show that the present Manor was sold in 1801 to Lord Carrington whose successor holds it at the present day.
The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane was built in 1869. In 1913 a schoolroom was added on reclaimed marshland where older residents of Bledlow can recall skating on frozen water. The Chapel provides the village with its Sunday School attended by many young children in the schoolroom.
The main Village School was built in 1868 and celebrated its centenary before closure in 1973 and subsequent demolition in 1984. Miss E. M. Folley had almost 52 years association with the school as both pupil and teacher. Present primary children must travel some 2 miles to Longwick. Five new flint and brick houses now stand on the site of the old school.

Bledlow has many listed buildings. The 16th century timber framed houses built near the church show the decorative Elizabethan brick herringboning but 'The Cottage' in West Lane is reputed to be the oldest house in the village of ancient cruck construction. It was once 2 cottages, the older of which is some 600 years old.

Now, although the old names of Heybourn, Gomme and Tappin are still here, most residents are commuters either to London, High Wycombe or Aylesbury. Like many villages it has become a haven, of rural living rather than a bustling village where people once were born, lived, worked and died; where the village was a self-sufficient entity within its own community.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Memories

Bledlow Station was opened at the beginning of 1864. The first Station Master was Mr John Greenaway; his son kept the Seven Stars public house opposite and had seven children. The pub was quite small, so every night beds were set up in the station waiting room for some of the children and removed before the first passenger train arrived in the morning.
In those days at Bledlow there were thirty-two trains a day, the station being manned by the master and two porters. Goods sent from the station were varied and in large quantities, ranging from two tons of Aylesbury ducks a week during the season to trawler blocks from James Walker's timber mills at Longwick which amounted to some two hundred tons a week, and milk from farmers in Bledlow and Henton. Many trucks of wood were unloaded at Bledlow and paper in large quantities sent in and out from the paper mills. In those days, rags were chopped at nearby North Mill in preparation for paper making at the Paper Mills. Then on a very sad day in January 1963, the station was closed after a busy and useful life of ninety-nine years. The line is still used to supply Thame Petrol Depot, B.P. and Shell.

J. Walker, Bledlow

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Description of Bledlow from Kelly's Directory 1883

Bledlow is a parish within the parliamentary borough of Aylesbury, in the hundred of Aylesbury, union of Wycombe, county court district of High Wycombe.

The area of the parish is 4,130 acres and have a rateable value of £4,414; the population in 1881, including Bledlow Ridge, Pitch Green, and Rout's Green was 1,070. Lord Carrington and Eton College are lords of the manor. The principle landowners are Lord Carrington, Eton College, Mrs Heybourn, Thomas Taylor, James Britnell, William Clarke, Henry Gibbons and Edward Crough Esqrs.

Education

Bledlow with Bledlow-ridge Parish (Pop. 1,135)

One Boarding School, in which about 4 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

Three Sunday Schools, consisting of 64 males and 76 females, chiefly supported by the Vicar and his friends; there are also Eight Lace Schools, containing about 75 children, many of whom are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


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