Hardwick cum Weedon

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1788

Easting & Northing: 480219

Grid Ref SP800190 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

 

NameTypeNote
Hardwick cum Weedon PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Hardvic NAMES name for Hardwick in Domesday Book in 1086
Hardweke NAMES name for Hardwick in 1605
Hardwich NAMES name for Hardwick in Domesday Book in 1086
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST Weedon. First Mentioned: 1772. Built 1833
Furzenhill PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 385
1811 358
1821 420
1831 405
1841 428
1851 447
1861 425
1871 463
1881 433
1891 413
1901 321
1911 332
1921 325
1931 282
1941 N/A
1951 318
1961 312
1971 353
1981 332
1991 315

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Hardwick cum Weedon   St Mary   Baptisms   1558   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Hardwick cum Weedon   St Mary   Marriages   1558   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Hardwick cum Weedon   St Mary   Burials   1557   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PERRY FLEET SEAMONS WATKINS
2 SYMONS HOW STRANKS SEAMONS
3 BATSON SEAMONS HOUNSLOW FLEET
4 SYRED WATKINS WATKINS BATSON
5 MILLER BROOKS TODD STRANKS
6 BOWDEN THORN BATSON MILLER
7 EAST RAY MILLER HOW
8 MARCHAM HOLLAND HONOUR HOUNSLOW
9 HOW LEE FLEET LEE
10 BATES BATSON SIMONDS TODD

 

Description

Description of Hardwick cum Weedon from Sheanhan, 1861

The parish of Hardwick, with the hamlet of Weedon, contains 3,200 acres, and 739 inhabitants; of which 1,340 acres and 292 acres belong to Hardwick. The rateable value of Hardwick is £2,025. The soil is chiefly clay. The village is situated on the Aylesbury and Buckingham road, 3.5 miles N. of the former town.

Lillies is a large gabled mansion in the Gothic style, with cemented fronts, and stands pleasently in park-like well wooded grounds. It is now occupied by A.J.N. Connel, Esq., M.D. The late Lord Nugent wrote the "Legend of Lilies."

The village of Weedon is much larger than that of Hardwick, and is pleasingly seated on an eminence overlooking the town and vale of Aylesbury. It is distant about one mile south from the village of Hardwick, and nearly three miles north from the town of Aylesbury. Here are several modern genteel houses of red-brick; and there is a curious antique-looking house, bearing the date, 1649. A detached portion of the hamlet, called East End, contains two farms, and about a dozen cottage residences. Weedon Lodge, the residence of Mr. John Lucas, is a genteel red brick house, which commands a pleasant view. At the farm called Golbys, Weedon Hill, is a large range of farm buildings erected in 1860 be Baron de Rothschild. Being composed of bright red brick, with bands, chequer work, and devices in black brick, this pile is of an ornamental and attractive character. The disposition of the barn, stables, granaries, cattle sheds, etc. - forming three sides of a square, is perfect, and the buildings are of fire proof materials. The dwelling-house, also of red and black brick, and like the farm buildings covered with red tiles, staneds about twenty yeards from the farm-yard, having the high road between them. This place is in the occupation of Mr. Edward John Clift.

Hardwick was inclosed under the provisions of an Act passed in 1778, but Weedon was not inclosed until 1801. Under both inclosure acts, allotments of land were granted to the Rector in lieu of tithes.

Weedon contains 1,860 acres, and in 1851 the population numbered 447 souls.

Weedon

Weedon lies about half a mile to the east of the road from Aylesbury to Buckingham, about three miles north of Aylesbury. Some 350 people live in the village, in 140 houses, the oldest probably being the Manor farmhouse, which carries several dates in the 1640s on its walls. Several families have lived in Weedon for many generations; the Fleets for 200 or so years, the Finchers for upwards of a hundred.

By the main crossroads is the tiny village green, and Five Elms Inn, which is thatched like several of its neighbours. Beside the Five Elms a lane called Stockaway leads to the village pond.

Although the name Weedon means 'A place of heathen worship' the village has the distinction of having been the location of the first place in Buckinghamshire licensed for Methodist services, and John Wesley himself is said to have preached from a mound near the crossroads. Now there is a Methodist church, and a dedicated sanctuary in part of the Old Schoolroom, where Anglican services are regularly held. There are some traces of monastic ruins in the grounds of the Lilies to the north west of the village, but there is no material evidence to support the legend that there was once a convent called the Roses at the south east end, in the grounds of Weedon Lodge.

In the mid-19th century Lord Nugent, younger brother of the Duke of Buckingham lived in the Lilies, and it is rumoured that in his time the local militia used to march from a row of cottages still locally known as the Barracks, to be drilled on the Lilies lawn. Although the house was rebuilt in 1870, the fleur-de-lys has been retained in the porch as a reminder that Louis Philippe was expected to spend his years of exile from France there, but he went to another house near Aylesbury.

In the 19th century the village was almost self-supporting. Most of the men worked on the farms or at the Lilies, and the women and girls worked as domestics or as lace makers and straw plaiters for hats. There was a baker, a butcher, a blacksmith, bricklayers and carpenters, and a tailor, and there were several small shops. Nowadays apart from farmers and farm workers, most people travel to Aylesbury or further afield to work.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education

Hardwicke Parish (Pop. 235)

Two Daily Schools, respectively containing 30 males and 18 females; endowed by the Rev. John Bridle, a former Rector of tne parish, for educating 18 males and 12 females, the remainder are paid for by their parents.

Weedon Hamlet (Pop. 405)

One Daily School (commenced 1831), in which about 20 children of both sexes are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Sunday School (commenced 1831), supported by voluntary contributions consisting of 25 males and 35 females; attached to Wesleyan Methodists.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.