Iver

Introduction

Church: St Peter

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 6467

Easting & Northing: 503181

Grid Ref TQ030810 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Iver PARISH St Peter
Ever NAMES name for Iver in 1526, 1535 & 1597
Evreham NAMES name for Iver in the Domesday Book in 1086
Galyhylle NAMES name for Gallow Hill in 1517
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST West Square. First Mentioned: before 1700. Now a cottage
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Iver Heath. First Mentioned: 1837
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST High Street, Colnbrook. First Mentioned: 1708. Chapel built 1871
Bangers Park PLACE within the parish
Delaford Park PLACE within the parish
Gallow Hill PLACE within the parish
Love Green PLACE within the parish
Mansfield House PLACE within the parish
Richings Park PLACE within the parish
Shredding Green PLACE within the parish
Spital (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Sutton PLACE within the parish
Thorney PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 1377
1811 1635
1821 1663
1831 1870
1841 1948
1851 1985
1861 2114
1871 2239
1881 2309
1891 2476
1901 2690
1911 2767
1921 3095
1931 4919
1941 N/A
1951 9661
1961 10789
1971 11207
1981 11190
1991 10528

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Iver   St Peter   Baptisms   1605   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Iver   St Peter   Marriages   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Iver   St Peter   Burials   1678   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1863     1882         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1933     1940         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1940     1955         Logbook
    Iver     mixed     Iver     1932     1949     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     infants     Iver     1906     1923     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1891     1896         Logbook
    Iver     boys     Iver     1925     1933         Logbook
    Iver     boys     Iver     1880     1891     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1885     1910     Yes     Admissions Register
    Iver     boys     Iver     1911     1932         Admissions Register
    Iver     girls     Iver     1928     1932         Logbook
    Iver     girls     Iver     1903     1926         Admissions Register
    Iver     infants     Iver     1899     1932         Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 DARY SMITH STANBOROUGH RUTTER
2 CARTER RUTTER TAYLOR CARTER
3 EDWARDS BINFIELD BALL SMITH
4 MARTIN ALLEN RUTTER STANBOROUGH
5 NICHOLAS CARTER CARTER BALL
6 NASH NASH BROWN TAYLOR
7 MOSELY WELLS STEVENS BINFIELD
8 HARRIS CLARK WHITE WHITE
9 BUTTERFIELD SAUNDERS SMITH NASH
10 WOODBRIDGE HARTWELL HALL ALLEN

 

Description

Description of Iver parish, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Iver parish is 10.5 miles long and includes a portion of Colnbrook chapelry. The area is 6,149 acres; population 2,114; rateable value £15,758. The surface is varied, and the lower grounds are watered by the Colne. The Great Western Railway passes through the parish. The village is long and scattered and lies about 3.5 miles N.N.E. from Colnbrook, and 2.5 miles S.S.W. from Uxbridge. Iver is a place of some antiquity, and formerly a Market granted to Lord Neville, in 1351, and confirmed in 1461 together with an additional grant of two Fairs, to the Dean and Cannons of Windsor. The market has long been discontinued, and only a pleasure fair is now held in July.
Richings Park is now the seat of C. Meeking, Esq., who purchased the Rectory Manor in 1855 from John Sullivan Esq. This estate was purchased from the family of Britton by Sir Peter Apsley, Knt., whose grand-daughter carried it in marriage to Sir B. Bathurst, who died in 1704. His son who was created Lord Bathurst in 1711, collected hither all the clever men of his time. He alienated the estate in 1739 to the Earl of Hertford, afterwards Duke of Somerset who called the house of Perey Lodge, and died here in 1750. His Duchess, who held this estate in dower died here in 1754, and the estate came to her daughter, the Countess of Northumberland, whose husband (the Duke) conveyed it to Sir John Coghill, whose widow (Countess Dowager of Charleville) sold it in 1786 to the Right Hon. John Sullivan, M.P. for Old Sarum. The old house was afterwards accidentally burnt down, when Mr Sullivan built the present handsome mansion, in a more elevated part of the park. The house stands about one mile from Colnbrook, and two miles from Iver. The grounds run up close to Colnbrook.
Huntsmore Park is the seat of C. Tower, Esq. The house stands in a small agreeable park half a mile from Iver, and is a large gabled building. An old manor-house, approached by a court-yard existed here in the reign of Henry VIII. The Tower family purchased the place of Sir W. Bowyer, of Denham, in 1696. Iver Grove, a mile from the village, is the seat of the Rev. R. M. Boultbie. It was formerly the property of Admiral Lord Gambier. Lipscomb gives a plate of Delaford Park, the fine seat of Charles Clowes, Esq. The place is situated north of Iver, and was purchased in 1790, from Sir W. Young by C. Clowes, Esq. It had previously belonged to the Tash and Lawrence families. There are several other good houses scattered over the parish.
Within two miles of Iver are two hamlets called Shredding Green, Love Green, and Thorney. Oliver Cromwell is said to have resided at the latter place. There is a paper mill at Thorney.

Notes

Iver is recorded in the Domesday Book (Yfer - the word meaning a steep slope) but the first mention of Iver Heath (Everheth) seems to be about 1365. It was a sparsely populated area criss-crossed with many tracks and footpaths. Dick Turpin is reputed to have roamed the Heath.

The people eked out a precarious living from agriculture, and life must have been very hard for them. There was once a Workhouse perhaps an indication of just how hard the times were.

Our church, St Margarets, was built about 1862, and is a very beautiful building that blends into the countryside and did a great deal towards uplifting the people of the area at that time.

Over the years more and more people have come to live in the area and modern roads and improved transport have all contributed towards its growth. The famous Pinewood Studios where all the James Bond films have been produced, and which boasts the biggest studio in the world is within our borders, also Black Park where outdoor filming often takes place. The latter is also the venue for the South Bucks Agricultural Show which takes place annually.
Iver Heath W.I. was founded in 1920 and has flourished and grown since that time playing an active role in the village. During the Second World War they made meat pies under the National Pie Scheme — these pies were sold for Vid. profit each. Another wartime activity was canning fruit and vegetables — the Institute owned the canning machine which could be used by people for a small payment.

Our new Village Hall was completed in 1966 with a grant from Bucks County Council and voluntary donations of many sorts. One fund raising activity was selling bricks for 1/- each, and this raised hundreds of pounds - if you bought a brick your name was on it! The Hall was officially declared open by Lord and Lady Drumalbyn.

New motorways, a mixed blessing, have given us easy access to other parts of the country and the M25 has actually removed quite a lot of the heavy traffic which thundered past a lot of houses for many years, so progress is not always bad.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Iver Parish, with part of Colnbrook Chapelry (Pop. 1,870)

Five Daily Schools, one of which contains 20 females, who are paid for by private benevolence; in the other four, partly supported by private charity, and partly by payments from the parents, are 109 females.

Four Day and boarding Schools, in which 50 males and 16 females are educated vat the expense of their parents.

One Day and Sunday  National School, endowed with fee farm rents amounting to £16 6s. per annum, and the interest of £200  three per cent, consols; it is further supported by voluntary contributions, amounting in the whole to £40 per annum, which is paid to the master; a few of the children are also paid for by their parents.  This School is attended by 50 males duly, and about 8 in addition on Sundays.

One Sunday School, supported by the wife and daughter of the Vicar, in which 70 females are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.