Luffield Abbey

Introduction

Luffield Abbey Parish

Church:

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 467242

Grid Ref SP670420 Click to see map

Names

 

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Luffield Abbey PARISH  

Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WARD SEWELL SALMON SALMON
2 SANDERS RATLEY ELKINGTON ELKINGTON
3 GODSON LINNELL MUMFORD SEWELL
4 SEWELL ASHBY MESSOR WARD
5 SALMON ADAMS FESSEY SANDERS
6 RATLEY WARD ELLIOTT RATLEY
7 MUMFORD SANDERS DAVENPORT MUMFORD
8 MESSOR SALMON COLLEY MESSOR
9 LINNELL MUMFORD WARD LINNELL
10 FESSEY MESSOR SEWELL GODSON

 



Description

Description of Luffield Abbey by J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Part of the buildings of Luffield Priory stood in the parish of Lillingstone Dayrell. The site of the Priory grounds is now extra-parochial district of 510 acres. Part of this land belonged to Buckinghamshire until October 1844, when it was severed from it, and incorporated with Northamptonshire, under the Act 7 and 8 Vict. c 61. The monastery was founded here, in a selected spot within the Forest of Whittlebury, near the junction of the counties of Buckingham and Northampton, in the reign of King Henry I., for Benedictine monks, by Henry Bossu, Earl of Leicester. The conventual buildings and offices were principally in the parish of Lillingstone Dayrell, and church stood in Silverstone, Northamptonshire. In consequence of the poverty of the establishment, it was suppressed in the reign of King Henry VII (1494), and its revenues are given, first to the Collegiate Church of St George at Windsor, and afterwards to the Chapel of King Henry VII, in Westminster Abbey – to which it continued a Cell till the general dissolution of monasteries in the next reign. There are no remains of the Priory.