Linslade

Introductions

Linslade Parish

Church: St Barnabas & St Mary

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 1693

Easting & Northing: 491225

Grid Ref SP910250 Click to see map

 

Places

Places

NameTypeNote
Linslade PARISH St Barnabas & St Mary
Linchada NAMES name for Linslade in Domesday Book in 1086
Lynchelad NAMES name for Linslade in 1526
Lynchelade NAMES name for Linslade in 1543
Southcott NAMES name for Southcourt in 1925
Surcote NAMES name for Southcourt in 1826
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1861. Sold 1941
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Bethnal Chapel. First Mentioned: 1843
Chelsea PLACE within the parish
Southcourt PLACE within the parish
Tiddingford Hill PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 203
1811 281
1821 370
1831 407
1841 883
1851 1309
1861 1511
1871 1633
1881 1724
1891 1982
1901 2157
1911 2262
1921 2373
1931 2433
1941 N/A
1951 3270
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 5139
1991 5272

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Linslade   St Barnabas & St Mary   Baptisms   1690   1880   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Linslade   St Barnabas & St Mary   Baptisms   1896   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Linslade   St Barnabas & St Mary   Baptisms   1880   1896   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Linslade   St Barnabas & St Mary   Marriages   1575   1908   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Linslade   St Barnabas & St Mary   Burials   1718   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GURNEY GURNEY SMITH SMITH
2 HICKMAN CRESSEY FAULKNER TURNEY
3 CORBET ADAMS MEAD FAULKNER
4 TURNEY JOHNSON TURNEY GURNEY
5 NORTHE NASH QUICK MEAD
6 PEATMAN TURNEY COTCHING COTCHING
7 PRENTISE COTCHIN WHITMAN ADAMS
8 PRENTIS ROE CARTER QUICK
9 NORTH COTCHING TAVENER CARTER
10 PRENTICE THEED COOK WHITMAN

 

Description

Description of Linslade from J.J.Sheahan, 1861.

Linslade or Linchlade, including the hamlet of Southcote, contains 1,830 acres, and population numbers 1,511 souls. The name of the place has been thought to be derived from the Saxon Len, a spring, and a lade, a small hill; but it is also conjectured to be from linge, or ling, a vegetable production abounding in the vicinity of the slade, or glade, between the irregular eminences, near and through which the Ousel takes its course. A spring of ancient celebrity appears to have caused this place to become noted; and this would render the first supposition plausible. The parish is on the verge of the county, and divided from that of Leighton Buzzard, in Bedfordshire, by the river Ousel. The soil is chiefly clay, with a thin stratum, and chalky fragments washed from the Chiltern Hills; but in the valleys it is sandy and interspersed with springs.

The village, or as it is now termed, Old Linslade, is situated on elevated ground 2 mile N. by W from the market-town of Leighton Buzzard, and is reduced to the old church, the manor house, and two cottages. Here are fourteen acres of wood, and a plantation of Scotch firs, and these taken with the Ousel, and the Grand Junction Canal winding through the valley, and the plantations of tall larch and Scotch fir on the Bedfordshire side of the vale, form a charmingly rural scene. On a spot which was formerly called Chelsea, and which consisted of but a few thatched cottages contiguous to the Leighton Buzzard Station of the London and North Western Railway, a little town has sprung up of late years, called New Linslade. This consists of several streets of genteel private residences, and some large inns; but owing to its adjacency to Leighton Buzzard (from which it is distant half a mile eastward) there are few shops. In 1848-9 a new Church and Schools were built here, and in 1854, a Parsonage was added. The town is built chiefly of brick, and is increasing in size. The present Railway Station was opened on the 14th of February, 1859, at which the previous station which stood some distant from it was taken down. The stream of the Ousel is here crossed by a brick bridge of two arches, in the centre of which is the boundary stone of the counties of Bucks and Beds, with the arms of these counties carved thereon. A short distance from this bridge is the Grand Junction Canal, which occupies 30 acres 26 perches of this parish. The Railway Company occupy 46 acres 13 perches, including a portion of the branch line from this place to Dunstable. The Petty Sessions for the Ivinghoe Division of Cottesloe Hundred are held here.

Linslade had formerly a weekly market on Thursdays, the charter for which was granted to William de Beauchamp, by King Henry III. in 1251. This charter also granted an annual fair here for eight days, at the Feast of the Nativity of the blessed Virgin, as well as free warren to Beauchamps in all their demesnes in Linslade.

The manor house – Linslade House – the seat of the Corbets, stands a little eastward of the old church, and is a plain, square, brick built house with stone dressings. It is surrounded by about 14 acres of park like ground, in which is some good timber. In front of the house are two fine trees of spruce fir, each about 100 feet in height. Linslade House, which has lately had farm premises added to it, is the property of the Lord of the Manor (Mr Pulsford), and in the tenancy of Sir W. Hayter, whose steward, Mr. Robert Fergus, occupies it.

Southcote, Southcott, or Surcott is a hamlet in this parish, situated about a quarter of a mile from New Linslade, and consists of four farms, and about twenty cottages – the tatter surrounding an open green. From the fact that hops grow here, wild, in the hedge-rows, and that a field in the place is known as the Hop Garden, it may be conjectured that hops were formally cultivated in Southcote.

The Parsonage House was erected with monies received by way of donations from the Governors of the Queen Anne’s Bounty Fund, and the Diocesan Society, as well as by subscription. It stands close to the church, on its south-east side, is a very neat residence, with gables, and is built of white brick.

The building for the schools is on the south side of the church, and is composed of the same kind of material as the parsonage. It is in the Gothic style and consists of two large rooms for boys and girls, and a residence for the teachers. The school-rooms are well fitted up, lighted and ventilated. About 110 children attend daily. The erection of the school building was aided by grants from the Committee of Council, the National Society, and the Diocesan Board. The remainder of the required sum was obtained by solicitation. The church, schools, and the parsonage from an interesting group.

The Baptist Chapel is a neat red brick edifice erected in 1843.

Education

Linslade Parish (Pop. 407)

This parish being contiguous to Leighton-Buzzard the children attend the Schools there.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.