Mursley

Introduction

Mursley Parish

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 2975

Easting & Northing: 481228

Grid Ref SP810280 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Mursley PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Moresley NAMES name for Mursley in 1526
Muresley NAMES name for Mursley in 1766
Mursalai NAMES name for Mursley in Domesday Book in 1086
Murseley NAMES name for Mursley in 1564
Saulden NAMES name for Salden in 1766
Solden NAMES name for Salden in 1760
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1838. Built 1883
Hyde PLACE within the parish, now lost
Salden PLACE within the parish
Salden PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 318
1811 310
1821 473
1831 495
1841 479
1851 553
1861 482
1871 488
1881 363
1891 369
1901 367
1911 383
1921 363
1931 342
1941 N/A
1951 430
1961 402
1971 452
1981 451
1991 425

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1578   1867   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1575   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Mursley   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1578   1898   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GURNEY PITKIN DICKENS DICKENS
2 VARNEY ADAMS BOWLER PITKIN
3 PETTISON STEVENS TURVEY BOWLER
4 COOKE COLLIER LAMBOURNE ADAMS
5 MAYNARD BOWLER SCOTT COLLIER
6 BRAMPTON HARRIS COLLIER STEVENS
7 BAYLEY JAMES WILLIS TURVEY
8 HARRIS WILLIATT LAMBOURN LAMBOURNE
9 ADAMS CLARK COLLYER TURNER
10 HARDING TURNER TURNER SCOTT

 

Description

Description of Mursley from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Mursley-cum-Salden extends over an area of 2,840 acres. Population 481 souls. The soil is clay, gravel and loam. The common lands were inclosed in 1815. The Buckinghamshire Railway passed through the parish, on its north side, occupying 28 acres, 2 roods, 27 perches of land. The rateable value of the parish is £3,721.

The village is large, forming one street of mostly ancient houses, and lies about 3.5 miles N. E. from Winslow, and 1 mile from Swanbourne Railway Station. In that ancient register called Domesday Book, the name of the place is written Muselai.

A weekly Market, on Thursday, at Muresley, was granted in 1230 to the Prior of Snelshall. Warine Fitz-Gerald had another charter for a market on Wednesdays, in 1243, and a Fair on the festival on the festival of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. This charter was renewed to John Duke of Bedford, who had a grant of another fair on the Nativity of Blessed Virgin renewed to Robert Whittingham in 1449. The Rev. Thomas Horn, who exchanged the Rectory of Mursley in 1851, with the late Vicar (Rev. T. K. W. Harries) for the Rectory of Haverfordwest, has written an excellent paper “On the History and Antiquities of Mursley” which is published in the first vol. of the “Bucks Records;” and in that paper Mr Horn says, “How Mursley came to be a market town seems to have been this :- The direct road from Buckingham to Dunstable, and so to London, lay through this place; Mursley and Leighton divided the distance between Buckingham and Dunstable: so that Mursley was well situate for a small market town lying between them. When Aylesbury began to flourish, and the forementioned towns, Buckingham and Dunstable, decayed, the road through Mursley began to be neglected; and so poor Mursley (it is the expression found in Cole’s MSS.) dwindled into a neglected village. To shew the antiquity and comparative consideration of the place” continues the reverend writer, “it is worthy to remark, that Winslow was then of no note, and had no market till five years after Mursley.”

The Rectory House, south-east of the church, is a neat building, very pleasantly situated, with a good southern prospect. In a field adjoining the Rectory garden is apiece of ground moated, most probably the site of an ancient manor-house. The School, in the vicinity of the church, was erected in 1834, and is a neat brick building. About 30 children attend daily.

The Baptist Chapel, at the north of the village, is a small building of brick. The “Church Land” consists of 7 acres 3 roods 1 perch; and 30 acres are let to the poor in small garden allotments.

 

Education

Mursley (with Salden) Parish (Pop. 495)

One Infant School (commenced 1832) consisting of about 40 children, supported by subscription, and small payments from the parents of the children.

Three Sunday Schools; one consists of 40 males, chiefly supported by the Rector; another, 60 females (commenced 1819) supported by a lady; the other is supported by Baptists, and consists of about 30 children of both sexes.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.