Radclive-cum-Clackmore

Introductions

Church: St John the Evangelist

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1186

Easting & Northing: 467233

Grid Ref SP670330 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Radclive PARISH St John the Evangelist
Radclive cum Chackmore PARISH St John the Evangelist
Cheackmore NAMES name for Chackmore in 1639
Radcliff NAMES name for Radclive in 1825
Radeclive NAMES name for Radclive in Domesday Book in 1086
Radlyff NAMES name for Radclive in 1526
Ratcliff NAMES name for Radclive in 1537, 1590 and 1755
Ratclyffe NAMES name for Radclive in 1542
Ratley NAMES name for Radclive in 1675
Quaker NON-CONFORMIST Chackmore. First Mentioned: 1776
Chackmore PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 252
1811 227
1821 296
1831 334
1841 364
1851 387
1861 356
1871 339
1881 367
1891 321
1901 295
1911 294
1921 261
1931 258
1941 N/A
1951 200
1961 231
1971 197
1981 210
1991 223

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Radclive   St John the Evangelist   Baptisms   1646   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Radclive   St John the Evangelist   Marriages   1600   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Radclive   St John the Evangelist   Burials   1591   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 KING SALMON WELCH WELCH
2 TURVEY SMITH HARRIS SALMON
3 GROVE GEORGE STANTON HARRIS
4 SALMON WELCH SALMON SMITH
5 PARSONS SANDWELL BALDWIN TURVEY
6 KEMP KING TOMPKINS GEORGE
7 FISHER TURVEY HINES STANTON
8 BRASSE TOMKINS SHEARS KING
9 ALLEN WATSON NORTH BALDWIN
10 SMYTH WOOTON TURVEY JEFFS

 

Notes

Chackmore is a little village off Stowe Avenue. In its centre is an elm tree, of which this saying has been handed down for generations:— 'if no baby is born in the village during a year the tree will fall down'. It still stands

In my childhood the village had a carrier who set out on a Saturday morning with his four-wheeled cart, pulled by a fine chestnut horse, for Dadford, three miles away. He collected shopping orders and sometimes passengers from both villages, journeyed back to Chackmore and on to Buckingham to pick up the shopping which he delivered from house to house in the afternoon.
At Whitsun we looked forward to the gipsies invading a farmer's field with roundabouts and all the fun of the fair.
The annual Harvest Supper was a great event. My mother cooked a huge ham in her copper, and salt beef in the big boiler on the old black grate. Barrels of beer were rolled up to the farmyard from the Queen's Head inn. Then dancing followed in the gaily decorated barn.
On Boxing Day we always greeted the arrival of 'the Mummers' with the dancing bear and moneybox.
On a Saturday morning children walked the three miles to a Stowe farm to purchase half a gallon of skim milk for twopence to make the Sunday milk puddings.

F.M. Fricker, Dadford


Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Description

 

Description of Radclive-cum-Chackmore from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Radclive, Radcliffe, or Ratcliff is said to derive its name from the colour of the soil, and an abrupt eminence near the course of the Ouse, by which the parish is intersected. Area, including the hamlet of Chackmore, 1,190 acres; population, 356; rateable value, £1,671; soil, clay, and gravel. The Buckinghamshire Railway passes through the parish.

The village is small, but neat and cleanly, and stands in a hollow 1½ mile W. of Buckingham.

Radclive formed part of the Barony of St. Wallery, which belonged jointly to Roger D'Ivery and Robert D'Oyly. King Henry I. Bestowed this barony on Reginald, son of Guy. Bernard de St. Wallery, his successor, died about 1192, and upon the death of his heir without male issue, in 1219, this manor passed to the family of St. Liz, a younger branch of the Earls of Huntingdon & Northampton. This family continued to hold Radclive in 1340. In 1365, William of Wykeham, then Prebendary of Buckingham, afterwards Bishop of Winchester, who, becoming the founder of New College, in Oxford, bestowed this manor and advowson upon upon the Warden ans Scholars of that Society, who continue the proprietors and patrons. Mr. Richard Ridgeway, of Buckingham, is the lessee under the college. Mr. Salmon, of Clackmore, has also an estate in the parish.

The Manor House stands south-west of the church, and though still a large building, is but the remains of a decayed mansion. It is of the age of Queen Elizabeth, or King James (one of the front walls bears the date 1621); and in the time of King Charles I. Willis tells us that it was inhabited by Sir Thomas Denton, and afterwards by his son-in-law, Sir William Smith, who was an M.P. For Buckingham. Sir William inclosed a park here, but he afterwards conveyed all his interest in the mansion to Captain John Woodfine, whose widow, after his death in 1693, threw open the park and sold the deer. In 1735 the estate was leased by New College to one of the family Lee, who married the daughter of John Woodfine, Esq.

The living of Radclive-cum-Chackmore is a Rectory, in the gift of New College, Oxford, and incumbency of the Rev. John Coker. It is rated at £8 1s. 3d. For first fruits, and returned of the annual value of £434. The advowson has been immemorially appendant to the manor. The parish was inclosed in 1733, when the tithes of Chackmore were commuted for land, and those of Radclive for rent-charge.

The Church (St John the Evangelist) is composed of a nave, chancel, south porch, and a low embattled west tower, in which are three bells. The nave and tower tower are covered with lead – the chancel with tiles. The greater portion of the building is a very Early English; the south doorway is a good specimen of that style, with banded shafts, foliated capitals, and the toothed with other ornaments in the arch. The chancel arch has also foliated capitals to the shafts, and the toothed ornament at intervals.

The Rectory House, near the church, is a spacious residence surrounded by tastefully laid down grounds. The situation is pleasant.

From a field in Radclive called Town Close the foundations of numerous buildings were removed some years ago. Some Roman Remains have been found here, among which is a Roman vessel which was presented to the Bucks Architectural and Archaeological Society by the Rev. John Coker. A Roman Road is supposed to have passed in this direction.

Chackmore Hamlet. Chackmore, a compact and genteel village, 1½ mile N.W. from Buckingham, is approached by the avenue leading from Buckingham to Stowe House. One of the cottages, having walls of stone and a thatched roof, bears the date of 1693. In the centre of the village is a large handsome elm tree. It is probable that Chackmore, or Chalkmore, had formerly a chapel. The School, a neat red brick building, erected in 1844, is licensed for Divine School. About 40 boys and girls attend the school. About twenty years ago an ancient vase of urn was found here, in a gravel pit; it was supposed to be Roman, but it and its contents quickly crumbled into dust.

Education

Radclive with Chackmore Parish (Pop. 334)

One Daily School, containing about 10 children, and One Sunday School (commenced 1826), 45 of both sexes, wholly supported by the Rector, with the exception of one guinea received annually from New College, Oxford, to which the living belongs.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.