Memories of Lacey Green

Notes

Mrs Adams was born in Lacey Green eighty-five years ago and still lives in the house the family moved to when she was three years old. Her father was a travelling chair-man, journeying far to obtain orders for chairs, but he died when his daughter was not much over eight years of age.

In order not to accept the Parish Charity and be known as a pauper, she and her mother made lace or did beadwork so as to pay their way. Lace makers earned ½d  or ¾d per hour and supplied the cottons, but beadwork paid more, and Mrs Adams can remember sitting up all night with three others round a table, all working on one dress which was required for a particular time for the theatre. A very small needle was used for bead work, made of steel but called a 'straw needle'. When young she used to suffer from toothache and found that if she stuck a needle into the tooth it used to ease the pain. Eventually she went to the dentist and had the tooth removed and the dentist showed her the tooth with half a beading needle still in it.

F.H. Adams, Loosley Row & Lacey Green

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Description

Description of Lacey Green from J.J. Sheahan, 1861

Lacey Green Chapelry. This is a District Chapelry which includes the hamlets of Lacey Green, Loosley Row and Speen. Lacey Green is a hamlet deriving its name from a family who resided there, and possessed considerable property in the neighbourhood. It is three miles from the parish church, but the houses are much scattered.
The Church (St John the Evangelist) was erected as a Chapel of Ease to the church of Princes Risborough, by subscription, aided by a grant of £460 from the Church Building Society. This building was consecrated on the 3rd of July, 1825, by Dr. Pelham, Bishop of Lincoln. The Living, a Perpetual Curacy, is endowed with 18.5 acres of freehold land given by John Grubb Esq., of Horsendon, Lord of the Manor; 8.5 acres given by Lord G.A.H. Cavendish (afterwards Earl of Burlington) of Latimers; and the site of the church and burying-ground, by the Rev. Richard Meade, Rector of Horsendon and Perpetual Curate of Princes Risborough. The value of the living is £95 per annum. Patron, Incumbent of Princes Risborough; Incumbent, Rev. William Johnson Burgess Burgess.
The building which is of flint with square stones at the angles, is a plain but neat cruciform structure, with an open bell-turret for one bell, and a porch at the west end. The interior is fitted up with galleries, &c. to seat about 500 persons. It is lighted by seven good square-headed windows with iron mullions. The east window was erected by Thomas Hills, Esq., at the expense of £153. On shields decorating the ceiling are the arms of other contributors to the erection to the church. The west end gallery contains an organ; and the timber roofs are open.
The parsonage stands a little south of the church, and is a large handsome house in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1850. It is surrounded by two acres of gardens and pleasure grounds.
The Primitive Methodist Chapel is a neat building erected in 1855.
The school built in 1851 is situated near the church and is likewise a neat erection.

school

5  June 1874    Seven lace girls away all week (to finish off lace so that it was ready for collection, for which they would be paid)

10 July 1874    Two girls away all week making lace, both under eight years old.

24 July 1874    Eight children kept late until 4.30 for coming in late.

4 Sept 1874     Only five older children present in consequence of it being very wet morning, they will have gone wooding.

22 July 1881    Attendance poor the children being out in the fields.

12 Aug 1881    Attendance poor - harvest time.

1882              Throughout June most of children off school ill with scarlet fever

30 June 1882  School closed - teacher ill.

October 1882  Measles

December 1882 Scarlet Fever

December 1882 Several children off school - snow.

Jan 1883   Several children punished for not coming into school at the proper time, playing a game around the yard.

Sept & Oct 1883 Many children still helping with the harvest.

February 1884  Several girls absent - beading (fashon industry)

Until 1885 there was only one teacher for upto 65 pupils.

14 Oct 1885 John Widdicombe took charge of the school today. He was a Cert Master. Second Class. The only other member of the staff was Catherine M Claydon, a pupil teacher in her first year.

10 July 1874    Two girls away all week making lace, both under eight years old.

24 July 1874    Eight children kept late until 4.30 for coming in late.

4 Sept 1874     Only five older children present in consequence of it being very wet morning, they will have gone wooding.

22 July 1881    Attendance poor the children being out in the fields.

12 Aug 1881    Attendance poor - harvest time.

1882              Throughout June most of children off school ill with scarlet fever

30 June 1882  School closed - teacher ill.

October 1882  Measles

December 1882 Scarlet Fever

December 1882 Several children off school - snow.

Jan 1883   Several children punished for not coming into school at the proper time, playing a game around the yard.

Sept & Oct 1883 Many children still helping with the harvest.

February 1884  Several girls absent - beading (fashon industry)

Until 1885 there was only one teacher for upto 65 pupils.

14 Oct 1885 John Widdicombe took charge of the school today. He was a Cert Master. Second Class. The only other member of the staff was Catherine M Claydon, a pupil teacher in her first year.