Thornton

Introduction

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1347

Easting & Northing: 475235

Grid Ref SP750350 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Thornton PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Ternitone NAMES name for Thornton in Domesday Book in 1086
Terricot NAMES name for Tyrrelcote for 1825
Haseley PLACE within the parish, now lost
Tyrrelcote (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 85
1811 70
1821 78
1831 94
1841 101
1851 103
1861 111
1871 103
1881 67
1891 80
1901 78
1911 86
1921 137
1931 103
1941 N/A
1951 116
1961 233
1971 115
1981 84
1991 119

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Thornton   St Michael & All Angels   Baptisms   1562   1903   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Thornton   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1571   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available
Thornton   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1562   1809   Yes,
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Yes,
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Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 TYRRELL SHEEN WHITEHEAD TYRRELL
2 JAKEMAN GEORGE KING KING
3 ASHBY FROST BARRETT FROST
4 COLEMAN RICHARDSON COTTON WHITEHEAD
5 DICKSON KING FROST GEORGE
6 BLOUNT MORRIS CAVENDISH RICHARDSON
7 SHEPHERD ASHBY BARRATT BARRETT
8 PALMER CLARK SMITH ASHBY
9 DUDSON TYRRELL HOBBS SHEEN
10 WARD JUDGE SHOULER COTTON

 

Description

Description of Thornton, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Thornton is separated by the Ouse from Northamptonshire, and contains 1,332 acres, and 111 inhabitants. A branch of the Grand Junction Canal to Buckingham runs through the parish.

The village is small, and stands 4 miles E.N.E. from Buckingham, and a like distance S.W. from Stony Stratford.

The ancient Mansion of the Lords of the Manor was a quadrangular building of great antiquity, but modernised by Dr. Cotton. Thornton Hall, the present manor-house, was re-built in 1850, by the Hon. R. Cavendish (whose seat it is), and encloses a part of the old house. It is a large handsome mansion in the Tudor style, with a lofty tower, situated in a valley. The river Ouse flows past it and forms a cascade nearly opposite the house. There is much stained glass in the entrance hall. The grounds on the east side of the mansion are laid out in partarres, with gravel walks; and in the park are two stately avenues of trees.

The living is a Rectory, rated in the Liber Regis at £11 16s. 3d., and now of the annual value of £230. The advowson appears to have been always appendant to the manor. Patron, the Hon. R. Cavendish; Rector, Rev. Henry S. Templer. The tithes of Thornton were commuted in the time of the late Sir T.C. Sheppard, for £200; and the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford, has endowed Nash with £30 per annum. There is now 1.5 acres of glebe land, but according to former terriers there were from eight to ten acres. There is no Rectory House.

Nash Hamlet –
The hamlet of Nash, which contains a small scattered Village, 1,430 acres of land, and 462 inhabitants, is locally situated in the hundred in Cottesloe, 5 miles S. by W. from Stony Stratford, 2.5 miles S.E. from Thornton, and 1 mile W. from Whaddon. It was formerly a hamlet in Whaddon parish, but by an Order in Council bearing the date 15th April 1854, it was separated from that parish, and united to the adjoining parish of Thornton (for ecclesiastical purposes only), under the name of Thornton-cum-Nash. At the cross roads in the village is the base of an old stone cross, and a short distance from it is a Chalybeate Spring, called “Bretch Well,” This water never freezes, and will thaw other water in an icy state: during the summer months it is remarkable for its coldness.

The principle proprietors of Nash are the Hon. Frederick Fitzroy, W.S. Lowndes, Esq., Mrs L.L. Smith, and Mrs Reeves. There is a farm here called Holywell, and a field known as Church-leas.

The Baptist Chapel was erected about 60 years ago, and is a neat building. In the interior is a marble tablet to John King, who died in 1836, aged 81. According to the inscription on this memorial the chapel was built on Mr King's premises, and he invested £700 “for the support of the Gospel in this his native place.”

The National School was built in 1857, from a fund of £200 left for that purpose by the late Mrs. Hart, with assistance from the Committee of Council on Education, and grants from the National & Diocesan Societies.

Education

Thornton Parish (Pop. 94)

One Sunday School, consisting of 20 children of both sexes, supported by Sir T. Cotton Sheppard. The poor of this parish have the privilege of sending their boys to a free School at Beachampton.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.