Brill

Introduction

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 3109

Easting & Northing: 465213

Grid Ref SP650130 Click to see map

Names & Places

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Brill PARISH All Saints
Brunhelle NAMES name for Brill in Domesday Book in 1086
Bryll NAMES name for Brill in 1535
Poole Trees NAMES name for Poletrees in 1574
Poultrees NAMES name for Poletrees in 1766
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1839
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Little London. First Mentioned: 1883
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1841
Clare Fields PLACE within the parish
Lapland PLACE within the parish
Little London PLACE within the parish
Malecumb (lost) PLACE within the parish
Nashway (Fm) PLACE within the parish, now lost
Polestrees (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 859
1811 864
1821 1060
1831 1283
1841 1449
1851 1311
1861 1432
1871 1353
1881 1289
1891 1251
1901 1206
1911 1121
1921 1019
1931 946
1941 N/A
1951 877
1961 905
1971 1020
1981 1081
1991 1068

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Brill   All Saints   Baptisms   1596   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Brill   All Saints   Marriages   1601   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Brill   All Saints   Burials   1586   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GREGORY SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 WEST HUNT GUNTRIP SAUNDERS
3 EDWARDS SAUNDERS SAUNDERS GUNTRIP
4 SMITH GREGORY WHITE WHITE
5 GREENE CUBBIDGE PAINTER PARKER
6 HUNT PRICKETT PROBETS HUNT
7 CARTER WEST PARKER GREGORY
8 CUBBIDGE PARSONS KING PROBETS
9 CATER HUBBOCKS WAKELIN HUBBOCKS
10 WEDGE PARKER WELFORD PAINTER

Description

Description of Brill from J. J. Sheahan, 1861

 Brill is a parish of 2,600 acres (including 165 acres of woodland) and 1432 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £4,812. The parish is bounded on the west by the county of of Oxford. The soil in the lower grounds is a tenacious clay, intermixed with shells, loam and sand, of various colours.

The village, which is large and tolerably compact and well built, and consists chiefly of two streets, is seated on the table land of a high hill, 7 miles N.E. from Thame, 12 N.E. from Oxford, 8 S.E. from Bicester, 13.5 W from Aylesbury, and a mile distant from Dorton. From its elevated situated the place commands a most extensive and richly varied prospect, comprehending a panoramic view of nine counties; and the purity and salubrity of the air, and its contiguity to the Dorton spa, have made it the frequent resort of individuals, for whose accommodation several well built lodging-houses and shops have been erected in the village.

 Population in 1911 was 1,121 and in 1931 was 1,019.

Notes

Brill which is situated some 4 miles north west of Long Crendon is approached from all directions by a hill. It stands some 600 ft above sea level.

A 17th century windmill dominates the common from where there are magnificent views over Aylesbury to Calvert and over Oxfordshire to the Cotswolds. Many years ago the common was quarried, hence the deep undulations. Villagers have the right to graze sheep on this, and in times past refused to have the ground levelled as this would reduce the area of grass.

Cottages are set around a delightful village green. Nearby is the 12th century church with its 15th century tower.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

 

Education

Brill Parish (Pop. 1,283)

Two Day and Boarding Schools (commenced since 1818), wherein 39 males and 7 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

Two Day and Sunday National Schools.
A School was originally founded by Samuel Turner, Esquire, and endowed with lands for educating 25 males; this is now united with the above Schools, which have been subsequently endowed with the interest of £2,000, bequeathed by Sir John Aubrey, Bart.; they are further supported by subscription, aided by small weekly payments from all the children (the above 25 excepted); these (Schools are attended by 110 males and 75 females daily, and 96 males and 109 females on Sundays; a lending Library is attached to the girl's School.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.