Cadmore End

Introduction

Cadmore End Parish

Church: St Mary-le-Moor

Hundred: Desborough

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 478192

Grid Ref SU780920 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cadmore End PARISH St Mary-le-Moor

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Baptisms   1786   1912   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Marriages   1852   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Burials   1852   1973   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 MESSENGER LACEY PLUMRIDGE PLUMRIDGE
2 MESSINGER TAYLOR AYRES AYRES
3 YOUNG PLUMRIDGE OXLADE OXLADE
4 WYATT EAST DRUCE DRUCE
5 WRIGHT MESSENGER NEWELL BARLOW
6 WORTON DORMER BARLOW NEWELL
7 WOODMAN SHEPHERD SMITH SMITH
8 WOODBRIDGE PLOMER BASTON BASTON
9 WIXON PISEY ATKINS ATKINS
10 WITNEY MOLE JOHNSON JOHNSON

 

Description

Description of Cadmore End

Cadmore End, with Lewknor-up-Hill, is an ecclesiastical parish formed April 2nd, 1852, out of portions of the parishes of Fingest, in the county of Buckingham, and the civil parishes of Lewknor and Stokenchurch, in the county of Oxon, but by the County of Buckingham (Stokenchurch) Order, 1895, the Oxfordshire portion was, March 31, 1896, transferred to Bucks, and the whole is now in the latter county. It is 4 miles south-west from West Wycombe station, on the Princes Risborough and Maidenhead section of the Great Western Railway, 8.5 south-east from Watlington terminal station on a branch of the same line from Princes Risborough, and 5.5 north-west from Great Marlow, in the Wycombe Division of the county of Buckinghamshire, chiefly in the hundred of Lewknor, and in the petty sessional division, rural district, county court district and rural deanery of Wycombe.

The church of St. Mary-le-Moor, erected in 1851, in place of the little church at Ackhampstead, commonly called "The Moor Chapel " and then taken down, is a small building of flint with Bath stone quoins and dressings, in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave, south porch, vestry and a small western turret containing one bell: all the windows are stained.

Lord Paramoor P.C., K.C.V.O., K.C., is lord of the manor and chief landowner. The soil is flinty and friable sand with chalk and clay. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats. The population in 1921 was 284.

 

Notes

Cadmore End is a small quiet hamlet between Lane End and Stokenchurch. Unfortunately when the M40 motorway was built it divided the village into two, but this does not seem to detract from the beauty around it.
As Cadmore End is conveniently situated to Heathrow Airport via the M4 Motorway, we have our share of pilots living here. Most families work very locally or commute to London by train from High Wycombe.

There are many walks nearby including the old 'woolpack track' to Hambleden and the Thames and we get people taking the 'walks from the car' at weekends.
The Smock windmill which has been restored and used as a 'cottage' can be seen over the trees from this track. This was used in the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

There are old brickworks on one side of Cadmore Common but they have now been disused for many years.
The social life revolves around the village green cricket club, The Blue Flag and The Ship public houses, the church and school.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission