Cheddington

Introduction

Church: St Giles

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 1429

Easting & Northing: 492217

Grid Ref SP920170 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cheddington PARISH St Giles
Cetedene NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Cetedone NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Cetendone NAMES name for Cheddington in Domesday Book in 1086
Chedingden NAMES name for Cheddington in 1511
Chedyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535, 1545
Chedynton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535
Chetington NAMES name for Cheddington in 1526
Chiddyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1537
Shedyngton NAMES name for Cheddington in 1535
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1839. By 1860 combined with Baptists
Ivinghoe (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Populations

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 273
1811 301
1821 341
1831 375
1841 439
1851 508
1861 628
1871 745
1881 744
1891 654
1901 580
1911 547
1921 539
1931 533
1941 N/A
1951 520
1961 655
1971 1050
1981 1450
1991 1692

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cheddington   St Giles   Baptisms   1539   1922   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Cheddington   St Giles   Marriages   1556   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Cheddington   St Giles   Burials   1556   1923   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Schools

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1863     1880         Logbook
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1873     1912         Logbook
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1897     1924         Logbook
    Cheddington     Evening     Cheddington     1900     1931         Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available     Punishment     Cheddington     1923     1933     Yes     Punishment Book
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1924     1950         Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1924     1945         Minute Book
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1862     1903         H
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1860     1895     Yes     Admissions Register
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1874     1904         H
    Cheddington - Not available     Mixed     Cheddington     1921     1926         E
    Cheddington     Mixed     Cheddington     1874     1894         E
    Cheddington - Lady Rosemary Infants     Infants     Cheddington     1912     1915     Yes     Logbook
    Cheddington - Not available         Cheddington     1887     1950     Yes     Admissions Register

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 HOWES NEWENS STEVENS STEVENS
2 FOUNTAYNE BATES ARCHER NEWENS
3 SEARE GLENISTER SEABROOK SEABROOK
4 SEABROOKE JENKINS TOMPKINS CUTLER
5 HOWSE KIMPTON MILLINS ARCHER
6 STEVENS KYMPTON CUTLER TOMPKINS
7 KIMPTON STEVENS HEDGES MILLINS
8 EVANS SEABROOKE CHANDLER TOOLEY
9 PARTRIDGE SEARE EDWARDS SMITH
10 PITKIN TOOLEY GREEN HEDGES

 

Description

Cheddington of the early 1920s was a very different village from that of today. Then it was a very rural community comprised of not more than 200 houses. The largest of these were the Rectory, Manor House, White House and the farms. There were very few detached houses and the rest were terraced cottages. The 3 pubs at present in the village were supplemented by The Old Inn where beer only was sold.

The village then boasted 2 general shops which stocked everything from peanuts to glass lamp shades (for the oil lamps then used), a bakery with daily deliveries, butcher, cobbler, drapers, post office, newspapers, coal merchant, forge and 2 farmers delivering milk, builders and 2 undertakers. In addition to grocers from Tring and Leighton Buzzard who delivered orders and butchers from Long Marston and Ivinghoe, there was also a fishman and an ice cream seller from Wing.

The local men were mostly employed on the farms, with local builders, on the nearby Rosebery estate or on the railway. Cheddington was and still is the only village on the main Euston line. It is believed we had this honour because of the convenience for taking Lord Rosebery's racing horses to Newmarket or wherever they were running. The railway employed a staff of about 20 on the station alone. Besides plate layers, there was even a gasometer to supply gas for lighting the station and the station master's house. There w"as also a branch line to Aylesbury. The drivers knew all the passengers and checked we were all there every morning, if not they looked out for us rushing up late and would stop the train and hoist us up to the carriage. The train was liable to delays when cattle strayed on the line and had to be driven off.

The women in Cheddington went to work in the factories at Apsley and Berkhamsted, and those at home often did plaiting for the famous Luton straw hats, did dressmaking or made the Bucks lace.

Practically every house had a garden or allotment and very few people ever bought vegetables. But above all Cheddington produced plums. Nearly all the new estates are built on old orchards. Greengages, Victorias, damsons, Pond's Seedlings, Early Rivers, but above all prune damsons which were used in plum and apple jam and for dyes. They are not a dessert variety and very few remain except in gardens. They were sent to Covent Garden and Spitalfields market for sale, and in a good year one ton a day would be packed in the round skips sent by the fruit firms and collected daily by Tommy Lambourne on the coal cart and sent to London for sale along with the churns of milk the farmers sent to the London dairies.

Cheddington became famous in 1962 because of the Great Train Robbery which happened at a railway bridge just outside the village. A record sum of two and a half million pounds in used bank notes were taken and at the trial of the robbers record sentences of 30 years in prison were inflicted by the Assize Judge at Aylesbury.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

Local words
Hommocks along: walks in heavy boots with lumps of mud attached
Clapered: very dirty, muddy
Thragged: loaded
Sawny or gallus: stupid
Ceach: scoop of water
Sotchel along: walk along dragging the feet
Spraggle about: walk awkwardly
Lichup: lazy or walk slowly
Pottle measure: round measure for small apples, onions

Hare coursing used to take place regularly along the Mentmore road and also pigeon and rook shooting.

Before a hearse came into common use, coffins ere placed on a wooden bier and pulled along the Church Path to the church. The bier was kept in a shed near the Church Lane allotments, along with a bath chair for any parishioners in need of one.

Farmers used to go round the Lynces at night with lights and nets to throw over the bushes to trap the sparrows that did so much damage to crops. They eere paid so much for every sparrow caught and had annual Sparrow Club Dinner at Tring.

Dora McGuire, Cheddington


Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Description of Cheddington from Sheahan, 1861

This parish, including part of the hamlet of Seabrook (the remainder being in Ivinghoe), contains 1,398 acres and 628 persons. The soil is chiefly clay and loam. The rateable value is £ 4,616. The North-Eastern Railway intersects the parish, occupying 33 acres of it; and about from the village is Cheddington Station. of that line, where the Aylesbury branch commences. The Grand Junction Canal occupies about six acres of the land.

The village is small, and stands 7 miles N.W. by W. from Aylesbury, 5 S. from Leighton Buzzard, 4 N from Tring, and 2 miles N.W. from Ivinghoe.

Formerly Cheddington was not an entire parish, but had parts of the parishes of Cublington, Eddlesborough, Ivinghoe, and Marsworth, intermixed with it.

Education

Cheddington Parish (Pop. 375)

One Daily School, in which are 6 males.

One Sunday School, with 45 children of both sexes; supported by voluntary contributions, and commenced since 1818.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.