Cuddington

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1308

Easting & Northing: 473211

Grid Ref SP730110 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cuddington PARISH St Nicholas
Coydyngton NAMES name for Cuddington in 1535
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Dadbrook. First Mentioned: c1650. Present building 1831
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1830. Rebuilt 1864
Cowley PLACE within the parish
Dadbrook PLACE within the parish
Gibraltar PLACE within the parish
Holywell PLACE within the parish
Spurt St PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 435
1811 462
1821 547
1831 620
1841 626
1851 623
1861 590
1871 532
1881 476
1891 443
1901 455
1911 479
1921 431
1931 418
1941 N/A
1951 451
1961 594
1971 623
1981 573
1991 555

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1653   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Marriages   1590   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Cuddington   St Nicholas   Burials   1653   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Cuddington     Mixed         1863     1897         Logbook
    Cuddington     Mixed         1897     1923         Logbook
    Cuddington - Not available     Mixed         1923     1936     Yes     Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PIDDINGTON HOLLYMAN PIDDINGTON PIDDINGTON
2 CLARKE PIDDINGTON HAWKINS HAWKINS
3 HICKMAN CHAPMAN WEBB ROSE
4 BURNARD GREENWOOD ROSE WEBB
5 SMITH WHEELER SCOTT HOLLYMAN
6 WHELLER PLATER FROST SCOTT
7 ALMOND GUILFORD BETTS ROADNIGHT
8 ROSE ROSE WATSON FROST
9 HOLLYMAN HILL ROADNIGHT BETTS
10 HORE STEVENS CROTON WATSON

Description

Cuddington, a small village of approximately 600 inhabitants, is situated six miles from the County town of Aylesbury.
Cuddington's parish church with its Norman pillars has a list of vicars dating back to the 12th century, and the village also has a Methodist and a Baptist church.

Cuddington, however, is by no means without its own amenities; it has a village store with post office, a hairdresser's, two picturesque pubs and a playing field with club. A well-run village hall is the venue for many weekly activities. All groups in the village combine to organise an annual fete — always a very happy and successful occasion.
There are still a few farms in the parish, but most people work in the surrounding towns, with a few commuting to London. The village also has an increasing number of retired people.

In 1985 Cuddington won the Wilkinson Sword for the Best Kept of all Buckinghamshire Villages. The well looked after churchyard with War Memorial and the two village greens were particularly praised. The Parish Council has an extensive tree planting scheme in hand to compensate for lost elm trees.
One side of the village has a view of the distant Chilterns, whereas a drive way in the centre of the village leads down in the opposite direction to the neighbouring village of Nether Winchendon, whose Manor House estate used to own many of the houses in Cuddington. A narrow stretch of the river Thame runs through the meadows between these two villages, and beyond, the land rises to the ridge of Upper Winchendon.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

I was born in 1907 and brought up in the lovely old village of Cuddington. At school I was taught reading, writing and arithmetic. We girls were also taught sewing and the boys were taught gardening.
We were a very large family, and lived in a small cottage where the village hall now stands. My parents slept in one of our two bedrooms, and all the brothers and sisters slept in the second bedroom, four or five in one bed, some at the top and some at the bottom of the bed. By the morning some of us would be under the bed.

We had one living room and a small scullery. There was no sink and water had to be drawn from the well which was halfway up the garden. The old earth closet was up the other side of the garden. Cooking was done on an open fire. There was no electric light; we used candles and an oil lamp.

We had a large garden planted with vegetables, and Father had an allotment where he grew potatoes and greens which kept us going through the winter.
Father worked on a farm, and in the summer we had to take him his tea when he was haymaking and harvesting, sometimes having to walk a few miles across the fields. Mother was a very busy woman, and she would be called out any time of the day or night to deliver somebody's baby; she was a sort of local midwife, and when she had a little one of her own, she had to take it with her. She was also called out if someone died, to perform the necessary duties.

In the school holidays, we used to play down at the mill and paddle in the millpond, and play in the meadows and make daisy chains. We found all kinds of wild flowers – cowslips, ladysmocks, orchids (which we used to call King Fingers) and lovely quaking grasses.

We didn’t have any luxuries; no Easter eggs, or toys at Christmas, no birthday cards, but we were quite happy and contented. There were always a lot of gipsies around and on Sunday mornings one would come with his barrel organ and monkey and play in the street.

We had a brass band in the village, and they paraded around the village at holiday time. We had a Village Feast once a year in May, with swings, roundabouts, coconut shy and stalls – in all a great occasion.

Our village had a post office, a grocer's and a butcher, and when we came out of school we would watch the butcher kill the pigs in the yard and burn them on straw. The butcher would then throw the pigs’ toenails across the road, and we would all scramble to get one to chew. They tasted delicious.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "Buckinghamshire Within Living Memory" (1993) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of Cuddington from Sheahan, 1861

The parish of Cuddington is bound on the north west by the river Thame, and contains 1,281 acres, of the rateable value £2071. The population, 623 souls. The soil is a clayey loam, with limestone and rubble. The greater portion of the land is arable, and the remainder excellent pasture land. Stone of good quality and used for building purposes, is extensively quarried here. In the southern part of the parish, on the brow of a hill just below Dadbrook House, is a Medicinal Spring, which rises in Haddenham parish, and was formerly of some celebrity. This water is received in a stone reservoir, near the highway, and is remarkably clear and pleasant to the taste.

The village is large and tolerably compact, and contains some respectable, through old farm dwellings, and a number of old thatched cottages. Is stands in a narrow valley north of the road from Aylesbury to Thame , 5.5 miles S.W. from the former town, and the same distance N.E. of the latter. Pillow lace is made here.

The Church (St Nicholas), which stands nearly in the center of the village, is a handsome structure of mixed styles of architecture, was thoroughly restored 1858, by subscription. Its parts are a chancel, nave, side aisles, south porch, and square tower. The latter appendage is embattled, and has at the north-west corner, a demi-pentagonal turret, containing a spiral staircase, rising above the elevation. This turret is also embattled. The tower contains a window in each face, a clock with a dial on the south side, and five bells.

The Vicarage House was erected by the present incumbent in 1857. It is a handsome building of brick, pleasantly situated about a quarter of a mile from the church, on high ground. The gardens attached to it are planted with choice shrubs and flowers.

Education

Cuddington Parish (Pop. 620)

Three Sunday Schools,

one with 30 children who attend the Established Church; supported by the parish funds;

the other two are attached to Wesleyans and Baptists, and consist of 71 children; supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.