Fulmer

Introduction

Church: St James

Hundred: Stoke

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1895

Easting & Northing: 499185

Grid Ref SU990850 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Fulmer PARISH St James
Fullmer NAMES name for Fulmer in 1766

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 292
1811 262
1821 340
1831 391
1841 355
1851 328
1861 351
1871 412
1881 428
1891 349
1901 340
1911 255
1921 279
1931 401
1941 N/A
1951 557
1961 602
1971 573
1981 506
1991 468

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Fulmer   St James   Baptisms   1658   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Fulmer   St James   Marriages   1605   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Fulmer   St James   Burials   1658   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ARNOLD SPRING BOWLER SPRING
2 NEWTON GROVE SPRING BOWLER
3 TRUMPER ARCHER NEWELL FOSTER
4 LITTLER ROSE FOSTER PARKER
5 LITTLE FOSTER BROWN BROWN
6 HARVEY ALLEN RIDDLE NEWELL
7 ALLEN TURNER PARKER RIDDLE
8 SNAPES BIGGS DANCER DANCER
9 PRATT WINTER DALEY SMITH
10 MUMFORD TREADAWAY OSBORNE ARNOLD

 

Notes

Nestling between two motorways, the M25 and M40, Fulmer is on the surface the epitome of an English village. It has its winding village street flanked by the village shop and post office, the church, the public house, The Black Horse, and the village hall. There is even a village school which takes children up to eight years old. However, the majority of the people who live in the village do not work there.

There is one farm given over to sheep and intensive egg and pig production, an equestrian centre which also houses a branch of the Riding for the Disabled Association and the Muschamp Stud where German Trakhener horses are bred and a very successful dressage competition is held every year. There are numerous large mansions in and around the village, but these have mostly been turned into flats or in one case become the laboratories of a pharmaceutical research company.

Much of the social life of the village is organised by the Fulmer Family Social Club. In addition to Fulmer Day in June when there are stalls, entertainments, sports and a carnival procession, they also organise other social activities like a Christmas social and the fireworks on November 5th.
The Black Horse is the only public house in the area. It started life as a building hut when the church was built in 1610 and was used for the local petty sessions as early as 1681. The present building has been standing — or sinking as there are no solid foundations — on the site since the late 18th century with additions in 1926 and 1952.

Considering Fulmer's closeness to London it is extremely lucky to be surrounded by beautiful and varied countryside.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Description

1861 description of Fulmer from J. J.  Sheahan.

The inclosed land in this parish is about 1390 acres, and there are upwards of 360 acres of common land, forming part of Gerrard's Cross Heath; population 351; rateable value, £1,978. The place derives its name from a mere or lake in the lower grounds - now a swampy plain laid out for the cultivation of water cresses. The village lies 4 miles N.N.E. from Slough, 4½ S.E.from Beaconsfield, and 2 miles S from Gerrard's Cross. It is an exceedingly neat place, and has in it, and on the verge of the common, half-a-dozen gentlemen's villas, all neat houses of modern build.

Education

Fulmer Parish (Pop. 391)

One Daily School (commenced 1823,) containing 20 children of both sexes, who are instructed at the expense of their parents;

One Sunday School, with about 40 children, supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.