Granborough

Introduction

Church: St John the Baptist

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1580

Easting & Northing: 476225

Grid Ref SP760250 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Granborough PARISH St John the Baptist
Byggyng NAMES name for Biggin in 1766
Gainborough NAMES name for Gainborough in 1675
Grandborough NAMES name for Granborough in 1766, 1925
Grandborow NAMES name for Grandborough in 1653
Grenborough NAMES name for Granborough in 1535
Grenesberga NAMES name for Granborough in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1831. Rebuilt 1901
Biggin (lost) PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 230
1811 251
1821 286
1831 341
1841 345
1851 359
1861 374
1871 367
1881 300
1891 301
1901 297
1911 276
1921 239
1931 222
1941 N/A
1951 201
1961 261
1971 420
1981 410
1991 448

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Granborough   St John the Baptist   Baptisms   1538   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Granborough   St John the Baptist   Marriages   1538   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Granborough   St John the Baptist   Burials   1538   1907   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS STEVENS NEWMAN STEVENS
2 HOLLAND HOLLAND HIGGINS HOLLAND
3 GRACE SMITH DANCER NEWMAN
4 PITKIN DANCER SMITH DANCER
5 STEEVENS PITKIN NORMAN SMITH
6 WORRALL KING CLARKE HIGGINS
7 EMERTON THORP STAIRS NORMAN
8 BOTON GILKS STEVENS CLARKE
9 TOMLIN CLARK FOSKETT STAIRS
10 RUTLAND BOWDEN BRADBURY PITKIN

 

Description

Description of Granborough from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

 This parish contains 1,560 acres and 374 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,847. The soil is a clayey loam with gravel. The village is small and stands on a swelling hill, from which the place is supposed to have its name. Is is distant 1.75 mile S. from Winslow, and 8 miles N. from Aylesbury, The females are chiefly employed in pillow-lace making. In the, Parish Register the name of the place is spelt Granborowe and Greenborough.

The vicarage house is a small residence, a short distance from the church, on its north side. The National School adjoining the southside of the church-yard, was built in 1852, and is a very neat brick building. About 50 children attend. There is a Dissenter's Chapel, a snall building.

Under the Act for inclosing the Commons and Waste lands of this parish, an allotment of 5a, 2r 22p. was awarded in 1797 to the poor parishioners, in lieu of a right of cutting furze. This land is divided into many plots, and cultivated and occupied by the poor.

Memories

Granborough was once part of the Manor of Winslow. A windmill stood on the hill in a field still called Mill Knob.

An older resident recalls the village in times past:

Granborough in the days of my youth was a very friendly village, full of people of all ages, some very old. One thing which remains in my mind is the old ladies sitting in the doorways of their cottages, a shawl around them to keep warm and a pillow on their knees, making lace, without spectacles or any other aid.
Most of the present day inhabitants work outside the village, except those who work on farms. We once had a blacksmith, a wheelwright and undertaker, a coal merchant, baker, builder, post office and general store.
I remember that at one time the house known as Granborough Lodge, then the Vicarage, was supposed to be haunted by a vicar who died at Scarborough by drowning. Although I lived there for a number of years I never saw him.
During the war there was a day of fear and excitement when an American plane dropped a bomb in Church Lane which demolished the house of Mr W. Newman, our greengrocer, and damaged a few others.
There are a very few of the old families left now, but lots of newcomers, who we are pleased to say are very friendly and helpful, both in the church and in social life.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education

Grandborough Parish (Pop. 341)

One Sunday School, with 36 males and 28 females, supported by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.