Hitcham

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1484

Easting & Northing: 492183

Grid Ref SU920830 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Hitcham PARISH St Mary
Hutcham NAMES name for Hitcham in 1563
Hutcheham NAMES name for Hitcham in Domesday Book in 1086
Hycham NAMES name for Hitcham in 1526

 

Populations

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 200
1811 161
1821 172
1831 232
1841 267
1851 236
1861 205
1871 270
1881 395
1891 512
1901 553
1911 646
1921 657
1931 886
1941 N/A
1951 N/A
1961 N/A
1971 N/A
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Hitcham   St Mary   Baptisms   1561   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Marriages   1559   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1764   1812   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1753   1863   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Not available
Hitcham   St Mary   Burials   1562   1750   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GROVE MARTIN SAWYER COX
2 SALTER MEDWIN COX SAWYER
3 LANGTON AMAND NEWELL NEWELL
4 NICHOLAS GRETTON MOSDELL HOWARD
5 POOLE BOVINGTON WILLIAMS MOSDELL
6 STONE TAYLOR HOWARD WILLIAMS
7 FLOYD NASH WEBSTER POOLE
8 CLERKE MEDES SAWNEY WEBSTER
9 TAYLOR HATCH SLATER SMITH
10 SMITH SEDDING HORWOOD SAWNEY

 

Description

Description of  from Sheahan, 1861.

Hitcham lies on the banks of the Thames, and contains 1,370 acres and 205 persons. its rateable value £2,466. The village consists of a few scattered houses, and is distant 2.25 miles N.E. by E. from Maidenhead. The Great Western Railway passes through a portion of the parish.
In 1700 Dr. John Friend, the celebrated physician and writer, purchased the manor. After his decease it was sold to Lord Grenville, and it is now the property of Lady Grenville. The ancient seat of the lords of Hitcham stood N.E. of the church, but has long since been demolished.
The living is a rectory, rated at £11 5s. 7.5d. and worth about £400 a year. At the inclosure in 1778, almost 200 acres were allotted to the Rector in lieu of tithes. Eton College presents to the benefice, and the Rev. Henry Montague Grover is the Rector.
The Rectory House stands upwards of half a mile from the church, is a plain building, of brick, much improved and enlarged by the present Rector.

Notes

The hamlet of Hitcham lies between the villages of Taplow and Burnham. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book, at which time about thirteen families resided there. The ancient church of St Mary dates from about 1126 and in that century the first stone building was erected, of which the present nave walls appear to have formed a part.

The Lords of the Manor were often high-ranking officials of Church or State and the cottagers mainly would work for them, or for the tenant farmers. They lived near the manor house, which was north of the church. Lord Grenville — Prime Minister in 1806—07 — purchased the house in 1780 and the Lordship of the Manor in 1796. He acquired more land and built a new house called Dropmore Lodge. The old manor house became a school but was destroyed by fire in 1840.

Lord Grenville and his wife both died in the middle of the 19th century. Mr George Hanbury then bought lands around the church, including the old manor house site. He built Hitcham House, which still stands to the south of the church. He built a school (two rooms costing £350) and a reading room.

New roads, a new bridge over the Thames at Maidenhead and the coming of the Great Western Railway caused New Town to spring up in the south of Hitcham parish. There were a few shops and a pub, the Retreat. The general store, kept by Mr Wakefield, offered haircutting among the groceries! The shops have now changed or vanished. Some of them, being wooden, literally fell down. The public house moved into larger premises and still continues today, as the Maypole Inn. This area became the new centre of population.

In the north of the parish stands Nashdom Abbey. The name Nashdom is the Russian equivalent of 'Our House'. This property was built for Prince Alexis Dolgorouki in 1907-8 who engaged Sir Edwin Lutyens as the architect. The prince and princess did not live long in their impressive new house. They were both dead by 1919 and are buried in the churchyard of St Mary's church. This grave has a monument which incorporates a Russian icon. After 1919 the house was leased for a time to various tenants and in 1924 became the property of a community of Anglican Benedictine monks. It is the only Abbey of Benedictine monks in the Church of England.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Hitcham Parish (Pop. 232)

The children attend a National School in the adjoining parish of Burnham.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.