Latimer

Introduction

Church: St Mary Magdalen

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Amersham

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 500199

Grid Ref TQ000990 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Latimer PARISH St Mary Magdalen
Lattimers NAMES name for Latimer in 1526
Blackwell Grange PLACE within the parish

 

Links

Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial Buckinghamshire Remembers - War Memorial
Church Stained Glass Church Stained Glass
Search The National Archives for Latimer Search The National Archives for Latimer

Photographs

Photographs in our Gallery Photographs in our Gallery
Pictures in the Frith collection Pictures in the Frith collection

These links will take you to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Bucks FHS is not responsible for nor has any control over the content of these sites. If any of these links do not work please let us know. It would be helpful if you could say which parish you were viewing and the name of the link which is broken.

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 N/A
1811 N/A
1821 N/A
1831 N/A
1841 250
1851 N/A
1861 N/A
1871 N/A
1881 N/A
1891 N/A
1901 N/A
1911 609
1921 684
1931 858
1941 N/A
1951 778
1961 1225
1971 929
1981 1093
1991 977

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Baptisms   1604   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Marriages   1606   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Latimer   St Mary Magdalen   Burials   1605   1947   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 DELL POPE POPE POPE
2 COLEMAN TREACHER PALMER CAVENDISH
3 SCORESBY GATES CAVENDISH PALMER
4 GROVE EAMES STONE SEDWELL
5 ETHERIDGE SEDWELL SMITH STONE
6 POTTER HARDING SEDWELL SMITH
7 LAW LOVETT HOW HOW
8 KNOWLES CAVENDISH PLESTED PLESTED
9 KNIGHT CHRISTMAS BRUTON BRUTON
10 HAYWOOD CHILDS MERIDEN BATES

Notes

Latimer is in the beautiful valley of the river Chess. The village is centred round a small triangular green, although the parish extends several miles in a mainly northerly direction.

The history of the village dates back to Roman times and there are the buried remains of a building thought to be about 80 AD.
The first mention of a mansion at Latimer is in 1194. In the 19th century it became the property of Charles Compton Cavendish who, in 1858 became Lord Chesham of Chesham.

In 1939 Latimer House was requisitioned by the government and used as an interrogation centre for German and Italian prisoners of war. At the end of hostilities and after the property had remained empty for nearly a year, a college for the joint services was founded. In 1983 this college was moved to Greenwich.

On the village green is the pump which supplied water to the residents until about 50 years ago, when the water company laid on a main supply; one tap per household.

Also on the green is an unusual obelisk in honour of local men who fought in the Boer War. By the side of this memorial is a stone mound bearing plaques with the following 'The horse ridden by General de Villebois Mareuil at the Battle of Boshof, S. Africa, 5th. April 1900 in which the General was killed and the horse wounded'. On the other side the inscription reads 'Villebois, Brought to England by Major General Lord Chesham KCB in 1900. Died 5th. Feb. 1911.' These features arouse great interest in the many visitors who admire the village of Latimer set in the most beautiful countryside of Buckinghamshire.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Latimer from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This hamlet is situated 3.5 miles S.E. of Chesham. The estate was granted by the Crown in 1331 to William and Elizabeth Latimer, from whose family it derived the name of Islehampstead-Latimer, to distinguish it from the neighbouring manor of Islehamstead-Cheyne. From the Latimers the manor came to the Nevilles, from whom it passed to Sir Elwin Sandys, Knt., who held it in 1605. About 1625 Sir Edwin sold the manor to the Cavendish family. It is now the property of the Lord Chesham. When Charles I. had been forcibly carried away from Holdenby, he was bought for a few days to Latimer, then the seat Christian, Countess of Devonshire, and the Earl of Devonshire her son. “It may be supposed” observe Lysons’ “that the captive monarch experienced all the attention which his illustrious rank and misfortunes claimed, from the celebrated lady, whose zeal and loyalty on a subsequent occasion exposed her life to hazard.” Charles II. too visited Latimer.

Latimer House, the seat of Lord Chesham, is of very ancient date, but it has been enlarged and improved – indeed almost entirely rebuilt – by the late Lord Burlington, and by its present owner. It is a large handsome pile of building in Elizabethan style, with embattled walls, numerous gables, clustered chimney shafts, and other ornaments peculiar to this style of architecture. The drawing-room is an enlargement of the apartment occupied as a bed-room by Charles II., when he was entertained here by the Countess of Devonshire, before his flight to the continent; and the bed in which he slept still remains. There is a large and beautiful painted window on the staircase, containing the names and arms of the owners of the mansion from the time of Edward III. to that of the Earl of Burlington, father of Lord Chesham; and there is a fine collection of paintings by the old masters, which formerly at Burlington House, in Piccadilly. The park is beautiful and finely wooded, and a little river Chess is artificially widened in it into a small lake.

The ancient Chapel (St. James), situated in the grounds of the mansion, having become dilapidated, a new edifice was erected in 1841, from a design by Mr. Blore, at the sole cost of Lord Chesham. It is a brick structure, with stone mullion windows, in the Elizabethan style, and consists of a nave and chancel. There is a painted east window of modern glass, and a good organ. The pulpit is ancient and handsome; the carved sounding-board is modern. There is a burying-ground adjoining the chapel. The Benefice is a Rectory endowed with tithes, and is distinct from Chesham. The present Rector is the Rev. Bryant Burgess, who is also Vicar of the neighbouring parish of Flaunden, in Hertfordshire. Lord Charles is patron of both livings. The tithes belonging to Latimer have been commuted for £126 5s. and there are 5 acres of glebe.

The Rectory House is a good substantial building in a beautiful situation. The is also a school, for boys and infants, supported by Lord and Lady Chesham.