Long Crendon

Introduction

Long Crendon Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 3461

Easting & Northing: 469208

Grid Ref SP690080 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Long Crendon PARISH St Mary
Crayndon NAMES name for Long Crendon in 1524
Crendendona NAMES name for Long Crendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Long Crindon NAMES name for Long Crendon in 1626
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1853
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Meeting House. First Mentioned: 1799. Built 1828, rebuilt 1854
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1854
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840. Built 1866
Easington PLACE within the parish
Notley PLACE within the parish
Tittershall PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 991
1811 989
1821 1212
1831 1382
1841 1656
1851 1700
1861 1570
1871 1365
1881 1179
1891 1187
1901 1075
1911 1082
1921 907
1931 978
1941 N/A
1951 1205
1961 1498
1971 1978
1981 2347
1991 2403

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Long Crendon   St Mary   Baptisms   1560   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Long Crendon   St Mary   Marriages   1562   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Long Crendon   St Mary   Burials   1559   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WEST SHRIMPTON SHRIMPTON SHRIMPTON
2 BURT WEST DODWELL ING
3 BURNHAM CARTER ING DODWELL
4 CANNON CANNON WARNER TURNER
5 TURNER RANDOLPH TURNER WEST
6 BURNAM GIBSON EDWARDS CANNON
7 GREENING COX BUCKLE WARNER
8 BUTLER TOWERSEY SAWYER CROOK
9 HEARNE FRYER CROOK TOWERSEY
10 TOWERSIE WINTER BRISCOE EDWARDS

 

Notes

Long Crendon was originally called Creodun, a Saxon word meaning Creoda's Hill, Creoda being the son of Cedric, or Cerdic, the first king of the West Saxons. A large village two miles north of Thame, it came into prominence towards the end of the 16th century with its needlemaking industry. Lacemaking likewise was one of its crafts, having been brought into Buckinghamshire villages by foreign refugees as early as the 16th century. It provided work for a large proportion of the women and girls, some of them learning even from the age of five.
Its long meandering main street, bounded at one end by the impressive 14th century grey limestone church, and at the other end by the Churchill Arms, is picturesque with its colour-washed houses and cottages, mostly of the 17th century.

Long Crendon's oldest inn, also in the main street, is the Eight Bells, situated towards the church end and close to the famous old Courthouse. These buildings fairly come alive each year in springtime when a group of dedicated people, old and young, come together in order to re-enact a selection from the York Cycle of Mystery plays in and around our lovely floodlit church. Then, for a memorable week, are you likely to come across all manner of colourfully-attired medieval characters as they emerge from alley and doorway! Ruth Pitter, poet and much-loved local celebrity, has been closely connected with these annual performances, now in their 16th year, and did indeed modify some of the original text.

Long Crendon, in common with many another village, seems to have had its fair share of ghosts! There was the poltergeist believed to have haunted the Courthouse, the galloping horseman of Lower End, an unhappy little lady in much the same area whose soul is now said to be shut up in a salt box buried in a chimney wall at The Mound, and the inevitable woman in grey who is said to haunt the church. She, like the rest of them, is 'friendly and harmless, and glides away to keep her secret'.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Long Crendon from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Crendon of Long Crendon, is separated by the river Thame from Aylesbury Hundred on the west, and Oxfordshire on the south. Its area, according to the Parliamentary Return is 3,120 acres. Lipscomb states that “Crendon township contains about 3,063 acres, Notley about 725 acres, and a detached portion of the parish called Tittershall Wood 110 acres; in all 3,448 acres.” The present number of the population is 1,570; and is 3,448 acres.” The place is supposed to have derived its name from a Green hill on which it is situated; and its prefix as a distinction Grendon Underwood. The soil is chiefly a stiff pale clay.

The village, which is about a mile in length, is situated 2 miles N. by W. from Thame, and nine miles S.W. from Aylesbury. About one hundred persons are employed here in the manufacture of needles, and lace making is also carried on here to a considerable extent.

Education

Long Crendon Parish (Pop. 1,382)

Five Daily Schools (commenced since 1818),in which 50 males and 36 females are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, in one, supported by voluntary contributions, are 45 children of both sexes, who attend the Established Church; the other appertains to Baptists, and consists of 185 children, conducted by gratuitous teachers.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.