Maids Moreton

Introduction

Maids Moreton Parish

Church: St Edmund

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1366

Easting & Northing: 470235

Grid Ref SP700350 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Maids Moreton PARISH St Edmund
Holloweway field NAMES name for Holloway Spinney in 1607
Maid smorton NAMES name for Maids' Moreton in 1584
Maydes Morton NAMES name for Maids' Moreton in 1546
Mortone NAMES name for Moreton in Domesday Book in 1086
Pratchell NAMES name for Page Hill in 1607
Wellmore feeld NAMES name for Wellmore in 1725
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1822
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1869
College (Farm) PLACE within the parish
Holloway Spinney PLACE within the parish
Page Hill PLACE within the parish
Wellmore PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 239
1811 315
1821 407
1831 474
1841 570
1851 573
1861 543
1871 511
1881 448
1891 444
1901 425
1911 371
1921 351
1931 396
1941 N/A
1951 395
1961 389
1971 631
1981 731
1991 842

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Baptisms   1560   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Marriages   1558   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Maids Moreton   St Edmund   Burials   1563   1892   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ATTWOOD SCOTT KING KING
2 TURPIN PAGE JONES SCOTT
3 WARRE ATTWOOD SCOTT JONES
4 ESTON STEVENS COLTON PAGE
5 DIX KING ANDERSON COLTON
6 BATE SMITH LINFORD ANDERSON
7 SCOTT NEWMAN PAGE SMITH
8 ROBOTHAM MILLER PARGETER LINFORD
9 SHRIEVE HANNAH DANIEL MARRIOTT
10 SPRATLEY GIBBS NICHOLLS ATTWOOD

 

Notes

In the beginning of the reign of King Edward I, the family of Peyvre or Peover, of Toddington (Beds), held a considerable estate in the area and two pious maidens of this family are traditionally stated to have founded the church, thus giving the village its name. Foxcote, the adjoining village had a minute church, now converted to a private dwelling, and is well known because the late Dorian Williams owned the manor house.

Mummers used to come round the village on Boxing Day. The players dressed as clowns and wore odd garments. They carried a black iron frying pan, a club etc. and sang:

'Here come I old Bel Ze Bub,
In my hand I carry a club,
Over my shoulder a dripping pan,
Don't you think I'm a jolly old man?'


This was in 1926 when they were given a few coppers to buy beer. May Day was taken very seriously. Days before, mothers planned what sort of garland they would make for their daughters. Baby chairs, hoops, and crosses were prepared by binding mosses onto a base with twine and kept moistened with water. The evening before, they were decorated with the season's flowers - crown imperials (crown of pearls) were much sought after and were the high point of these artistic creations. Almost every child in the village went May garlanding.

Up to the beginning of the Second World War a baker in Main Street fired his oven (with faggots of wood) every Sunday morning. People brought their family joint of meat which was put on a rack over a roasting tin into which had been poured the batter for the Yorkshire pudding. Sometimes a fruit pie would also be taken later in the morning usually by the husband who would collect the whole meal on his way back from the pub later and taken home where the cooked vegetables were waiting.

There have been several 'characters' in Maids Moreton. One was Madam Morney, a member by marriage of the French perfumers. She bought the Old Manor House opposite the Buckingham Arms in the 1930s. She gave a lot of work to builders in Buckingham and men who were unemployed in the village. She had a herd of Jersey cows and sold the cream at 6d for about ozs. A Q.C. Stewart Bevan lived with her causing great speculation amongst villagers — she being French!
Another character was Dick Jones, alias Captain Starlight who on returning from the First World War, had to leave his mother's terraced cottage in Batchelors Row when she died. He dug a pit in a field near Chackmore Farm, thatched it with straw, dug steps in the earth at the entrance, and lived there on bags of straw until his death. As his nickname suggests he was very knowledgeable about the stars.

In the 1930s there was much poverty, although folk were too proud to let it be known. When the blackberries and mushrooms were ready, the women rose early, got the children off to school, quickly did their housework and went off to gather blackberries and fungi. 'Blackberry Jack' always appeared with the same intentions and was very abusive if the women went near where he was gathering. Mr Busby, a greengrocer, came by trap from Buckingham each day and bought the berries (to make dye or jam) and the mushrooms for a few coppers per pound.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Maids’ Moreton from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

This parish contains 1,240 acres, and 543 souls. Its rateable value is £1,880. The soil is clayey, alternated with gravel. The river Ouse bounds the parish on the east, and a branch of the Grand Junction Canal passes through it. The name of the place is derived from its locality being originally a moor; and the prefix from two maiden sisters of the Peyvre family, who built the church.

The village is distant 1.5 mile N. E. from Buckingham.

The school is a neat red brick building erected chiefly by the Rector, in 1854. From 60 to 80 children attend.

Charities In 1743 John Snart, gentleman, gave £100 to the poor of this parish, the interest or produce of the same to be given in bread to such of the poor on Sundays “as shall come constantly to church.” This sum was expended in the purchase of £158 2s. 6d. stock, three per cent. consols.

William Scott, by will dated about the year 1800 left £100, the interest to be applied in apprenticing poor children of this parish. With this sum £164 3s. 9d. three per cent. consols has been purchased.

Education

Maids Moreton Parish (Pop. 474)

One Daily School, containing 20 males and 20 females.

Two Sunday Schools, 37 males and 32 females; supported by the Rector, the Rev. James Long Long.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.