Marsworth

Introduction

Marsworth Parish

Church: All Saints

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Berkhampstead

Size (acres): 1266

Easting & Northing: 492214

Grid Ref SP920140 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Marsworth PARISH All Saints
Missevorde NAMES name for Marsworth in Domesday Book in 1086
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 259
1811 264
1821 391
1831 427
1841 484
1851 479
1861 549
1871 564
1881 455
1891 385
1901 396
1911 384
1921 316
1931 323
1941 N/A
1951 897
1961 570
1971 506
1981 656
1991 693

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Marsworth   All Saints   Baptisms   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsworth   All Saints   Marriages   1591   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Marsworth   All Saints   Burials   1575   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SEARE SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 WEST NORWOOD CHAPPIN CHAPPIN
3 TURNEY GREENING BATES SEARE
4 GURNEY ALLEN GREGORY BATES
5 IVES WADE EDWARDS GREGORY
6 WHITCHURCH WEST FIGG NORWOOD
7 NORWOOD STEVENS ROWLAND GREENING
8 HODSON FIELD SAUNDERS EDWARDS
9 GEARY SEARE BRANDOM ROWLAND
10 ALLEN ROWLAND GREENING FIGG

 

Notes

The Grand Union Canal runs through Marsworth with an arm of the canal going off to Aylesbury. The village is surrounded by farming country and was part of Lord Rosebery's estate. In the 1800s it had its own hospital but this was demolished in 1894 and the land is now known as Hospital Farm.


An elderly resident remembers trains on a branch of the railway line to Aylesbury, stopping at Marston Gate, just outside the village to pick up milk brought in from the surrounding farms for the Nestles milk factory at Aylesbury.
The canal was very busy at the beginning of this century. Boats carried everything but mostly coal, sand and wheat. In 1916 it was frozen over for six weeks and there was no movement of traffic at all with boats frozen in by the ice.

In the Second World War Marsworth became part of an airfield. The R.A.F. were there at the beginning of the war, flying Wellington bombers. They were followed by 4,000 American airmen who flew Fortresses and Liberators. A leaflet squadron was based there. The camp was a big one with a hospital, dining hall seating over a 1000, and a theatre. The stage from the theatre was later put in the village hall.

There was also an underground command post on the airfield. It was reported to be as big as a good sized bungalow and to be bomb-proof. It was kept well stocked with food and water at all times. Churchill was a regular visitor particularly towards the end of the war. He used to land there on his way to Chequers.

General Patten also visited Marsworth and decorated some of the American airmen during a service held at the camp.

Although Marsworth has grown since those war-time years it is still a very happy and friendly place to live.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Description

Description of Marsworth from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Marsworth, or Masworth parish, lies on the edge of the county adjoining Hertfordshire. The acreage is about 1,200, and the population is 463. The land is very good, chiefly arable. The Grand Junction Canal passes through the parish, from north to south, occupying 42 acres 2 roods; and here is a very large reservoir for the use of the canal, which, when full, looks like a small lake. From Marsworth, a small branch of this canal diverges to Aylesbury. The London and North Western Railway extends along 1 mile, 4 chains 48 links, through the parish. The rateable value of the entire parish is £3,347.

The village, which is situated 2 miles N. from Tring, 2.5 S.W. from Ivinghoe, and 6.5 miles E. from Aylesbury, is tolerably compact, and the houses are chiefly in the vicinity of the church. Stanhope’s End is a detached portion, consisting of about 20 neat cottages, and a steam flour mill, about a quarter of a mile south from the church, near the banks of the canal.

The Icknield Way which intersects this county in a south-westerly direction – entering it from Dunstable (its point of Junction with Watling Street) – passes through the south-east portion of Marsworth parish, and continues its course by Wendover, Risborough, Horsendon, until it enters Oxfordshire, at Bledlow.

The Vicarage House, erected in 1848, is a genteel residence, situated a short distance from the church, on its south-side.

The Baptist Chapel is a small red brick building. The school is attended by about 30 boys daily. The building is of white brick, small, and neat, with a clock and a dial in front.

Education

Marsworth Parish (Pop. 427)

One Sunday School, with 25 children of both sexes; supported by the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.