Nash

Introduction

Nash Parish

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1247

Easting & Northing: 478234

Grid Ref SP780340 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Nash PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Nassche NAMES name for Nash in 1520
The Breach NAMES name for Nash Brake in 1825
Strict Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1798
Holywell (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Nash Brake PLACE within the parish

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Nash   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1862   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Nash   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1858   1900   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Nash         Nash     1864     1906     Yes     Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 EMERTON KING SMITH SMITH
2 COOKE ILLING FRENCH FRENCH
3 CHAPPELL RAY DUNKLEY KING
4 QUINNEY FRENCH KING DUNKLEY
5 LEE EMERTON COLTON ILLING
6 STEVENS SMITH ILLING HARDING
7 MYSSENDEN PAIN HARDING COLTON
8 COX CLARKE WEATHERHEAD RICHARDSON
9 MALLETT ALDRIDGE RICHARDSON WEATHERHEAD
10 LUDGATE HARDING BRIER PAIN

 

Notes

Nash is a village built on a number of springs and is situated on the outskirts of the new city of Milton Keynes. It has approximately 320 inhabitants.

In the early 1900s water was obtained either from a well in the garden or from the village pumps. There were three pumps and villagers could be seen carrying buckets attached to a yoke around the neck of an older member of the family.
Amateur painters can often be seen with their easels by a small footbridge overlooking the pond by the village green. In the past a woodyard overlooked the green and pond and was well known for miles around. It has gone now and in its place is a riding school with stables and jumps for the horses.

In the early part of the century one of the villagers could almost always be seen in the doorway of her cottage making intricate pillow lace for which Buckinghamshire was so well known.

Modern Nash is home for commuters who work either in London or nearby Milton Keynes.

The village had for many years close association with the members of the Whaddon Chase Hunt which has now been disbanded.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Church

Nash and Whaddon Church History

 

Nash Church
The foundation stone for Nash Church was laid in 1857. The first Rector was Henry Templar who served 1858 - 1860

Well known Architect was G.E.Street 1824 - 1881     Quote  " Nash Church is a small building consisting of Chancel.
Nave,  North Porch and Bell Turret but it has a distinct  period Charm " Unquote.
That is why before 1858 all the people who lived in NASH had to be BAPTISED , MARRIED and BURIED in WHADDON CHURCH before they built the NASH CHURCH.

My connection is my Gt Grandmother Jane Dunkley who married my Grandfather William Mackerness

 

Patricia Harris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description

 

Nash - Description from J.J. Sheahan, 1861

The hamlet of Nash, which contains a small scattered village, 1,430 acres of land, and 462 inhabitants, iloccally situated in the hundred of Cotteslow, 5 miles S. by W. from Stony Stratford, 2.5 miles S.E. from Thornton, and 1 mile W from Whaddon. It was formerly a hamlet in Whaddon Parish but by an Order in Council bearing the date 15th April 1854, it was separated from that parish, and united to the adjoining parish of Thornton (for ecclesiatical purposes only under the name Thornton-cum-Nash. At the cross roads in the village is the base of an old stone cross, and a short distance from it is a Chalybeate Spring, called "Bretch Well." This water never freezes, and will thaw other water in an icy state: during the summer months it is remarkable for its coldness.

The principle proprietors of Nash are the Hon. Frederick Fitzroy, W. S. Lowndes, Esq., Mrs. L. L. Smith, and Mrs Reeves. There is a farn there called Holywell, and a field known as Church-leas.

The Baptist Chapel was erected about 60 years ago, and is a neat building. In the interior is a marble tablet to John King, who died in 1836, aged 81. According to the inscription on this memorial the chapel was built on Mr. King's premises, and he invested £700 "for the support of the Gospel in this his native place."

The National School was built in 1857, from a fund of £200 left for that purpose by the late Mrs. Hart, with assistance from the Committee of Council on Education, and grants from the National Diocesan Societies.

Education

Nash Hamlet (Pop. 377)

Two Sunday Schools, one with 58 children of both sexes, for the support of which the Vicar allows £2 12s. per annum ; the other is maintained by a congregation of Dissenters, and consists of 18 children; both commenced in 1830.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.