Nether Winchendon

Introduction

Nether Winchendon Parish

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1554

Easting & Northing: 473212

Grid Ref SP730120 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Lower Winchendon PARISH St Nicholas
Nether Winchendon PARISH St Nicholas
Witchende NAMES name for Winchendon in Domesday Book in 1086

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 244
1811 266
1821 284
1831 294
1841 291
1851 284
1861 316
1871 283
1881 257
1891 272
1901 222
1911 208
1921 168
1931 170
1941 N/A
1951 169
1961 143
1971 132
1981 141
1991 137

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Baptisms   1562   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Marriages   1563   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Lower Winchendon   St Nicholas   Burials   1563   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 PIGOTT SYRED SMITH SMITH
2 NORTH WARNER ORCHARD ORCHARD
3 TYRINGHAM ROSE BLAKE READ
4 HAWKINS READ READ BLAKE
5 BEACHAM DEWBERY MORTIMER MORTIMER
6 POXON GURNEY WATSON WATSON
7 CHILTON LUCAS LAWRENCE WARNER
8 BULL WHEELER WILSON ROSE
9 WOODBRIDGE HORTON SPICER LAWRENCE
10 WALTON COOLING ROSE WILSON

 

Notes

The village is largely unchanged from its 19th century appearance with few modern buildings and many ancient timber-framed houses, and some of the typical local construction of witchert, an unbaked limestone clay mixture. Many retain the ochre colour traditional in the village.

The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book and for many centuries belonged to the Abbey at Notley close by Thame. Some of the cottages still standing are believed to have been lodging houses for the monks.

The church is largely of the decorated period with evidence of earlier origin. The church clock was installed in 1772 by the generosity of Mrs Jane Beresford, Lady of the Manor. It is unusual in having only one hand. The bells were rehung in 1979 and are enthusiastically rung every week. The excellent condition of the church reflects the generosity of the Spencer Bernard family and the efforts of the villagers.

The village passed from the ownership of Notley Abbey at the Dissolution of the Monasteries to the Denny family, part of whose house, it is believed, is incorporated in the Manor Farm House. The seat of the present owners, the Spencer Bernard family is Winchendon House, a pretty Elizabethan manor house with interesting additions from the Gothic revival of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Members of the Spencer Bernard family have been in residence continuously since the late 18th century.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Fred Orchard of Nether Winchendon remembers how the postman walked from Waddesdon,starting at six o'clock in the morning and visiting all the farms on his way, thus considerably lengthening the journey of five miles. After a break lunch, he walked on to Cuddington to meet the pony cart bringing the mail, then back to Winchendon to clear the box at about four o'clock and back to Waddesdon, often in the winter in thick snow which seems to have fallen more frequently in those days.

The village people, with wooden yokes on their shoulders and two buckets, fetched all water from a conduit in the Manor farmyard, or for those on the hill, from a spring half way down. Fred recalls this was his first duty after school, both for his mother and a bedridden neighbour.

There were fifty to sixty children of all ages in the little school, the infants ranged in rows on a gallery. In Upper Winchendon the Rothschilds dressed the girls in red cloaks and round straw hats, and the boys in white jackets, belted and reaching nearly to the knees, and a peaked cap.

The lady living at the Manor Farm started the brass band which later joined with Cuddington to form the Robin Hood Band, so called because Lt. Col. Francis Bernard and Mrs Bernard of Nether Winchendon House provided them with uniforms of Lincoln green—thick green coat and green trousers with a red bib, which later was changed to red collar and cuffs, and a soft felt hat with a feather at one side. They used to play for two days after Christmas, and also at Club feasts and at the flower shows which were held in large tents in a field, and there was great rivalry among the four villages—Nether Winchendon, Cud­dington, Chearsley and Gibraltar. The wives of the bandsmen always sent an Aylesbury duck, dressed and trussed for the table.

Bertha Orchard remembers how in the 1914 war the children were given a holiday to pick blackberries which were weighed at school and then sent to make jam. They also gathered horse-chestnuts which were taken to a local farm to be ground down for cattle feed.

Mr Welford's carrier cart took people to Aylesbury but the journey was so slow that by the time you got there it was nearly time to come home again!

C. Archer, Cuddington

Extracted from ‘A Pattern of Hundreds’(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women’s Institutes

Description

Description of Lower Winchenden from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Nether, or Lower Winchendon contains 1,520 acres, and 284 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £1,887. The name of Winchendon is derived from the Anglo-Saxon, Wychen, springs, and Don, and eminence. The soil is various. The village is neat, and pleasantly situated in a well wooded valley at the base of the hills from which issue several springs of good water. It is distant from Thame 6 miles N.E., and from Aylesbury 6.5 miles S.W.

In 1649 Thomas Tyringham, Esq., the then possessor of the estate, purchased another estate here from Richard Knollys, Esq., son of Sir Francis Knollys, Knt At the decease of Francis Tyringham, Esq., in 1735, unmarried, his two sisters became heirs. Mary, the surviving sister died in 1745 bequeathing this manor and estate to her cousin Jane, daughter and heir of John Tyringham, Esq., and William Beresford, Esq., of Long Leadingham, Co. Lincoln. This lady died in 1771, leaving all her estates to her maternal cousin-german Sir F. Bernard, Bart., who died and was buried at Aylesbury in 1779. Sir Scrope Bernard, the fourth Baronet, married Harriet, daughter and heir of William Morland, Esq., and took the name of Morland; he was M.P. for Aylesbury, and afterwards for St Mawes; also Under Secretary of State; and died in 1830. His eldest son, William Barnard, Esq., was High Sheriff of Bucks in 1811, and died in 1820; his second son, Thomas, died an infant; his third son succeeded him in the Baronetcy, and also took the name of Morland at his father’s death; and Thomas Tyringham Barnard, Esq., M.P. for Aylesbury, brother to Sir Francis Barnard Morland, Bart., and heir presumptive to the title.

Winchendon Priory is the name now given to the manor or mansion-house which belonged to Notley Abbey. It is the seat of T. T. Bernard, Esq., M.P., and stands southward of the church, on low ground. Sir John Dauncy, a Judge, in the reign of Henry VIII. partly rebuilt it; the Tyringhams improved it about the year 1600; and its present owner has recently expended a large sum upon it. The mansion is battlemented, encloses a small court, and has mullioned windows and ornamental chimney shafts. It contains a good collection of family and other portraits, much stained glass in heraldic and other devices, and many pieces of ancient furniture. Opposite to the front of the house, the main Thame stream is crossed by a small bridge; and on the banks of the river is an ancient water mill. The lawn is diversified with trees, and an avenue of limes of considerable age, forms the approach to the village.

Near the churchyard, on the west side, is a portion of the ancient mansion of the Knolly family, built of timber and brick, with three gables on its south side, and angular chimney shafts. After the death of the last Lady Knollys, the house, with certain lands here passed to the family of Longmire, and from them to the Martyn family. In 1858 the estate was sold by the Martyns to Mr. Thomas Dover, its present owner.

On the Hill Farm the property of Richard Rose, Esq., are three ornamental clumps of trees; and at the extremity of a large pasture called The Grove (belonging to T. T. Bernard, Esq.), are the remains of a moat, within which, doubtless, stood a mansion of which nothing is now known. There is a manor-farm called The Marsh, which belongs to the Duke of Buckingham. This estate was purchased in 1671 by Richard Grenville, Esq., of Wotton. Besides the landowners mentioned, Mr Jonathan Clarke and Mr W. C. Harding have estates here.

There is no Parsonage House, and the school is held in a room attached to the Bear Inn. About 40 children attend.

Education

Nether Winchendon Parish (Pop. 294)

One Daily School, containing 15 males and 12 females (commenced 1823), whose instruction is paid for by their parents;

One Sunday School, of 20 males and 20 females, supported by subscription.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.