Oakley

Introduction

Oakley Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Thame

Size (acres): 2283

Easting & Northing: 463212

Grid Ref SP630120 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Oakley PARISH St Mary
Achelei NAMES name for Oakley in Domesday Book in 1086
Ickshill NAMES name for Ixhill in 1826
Ixsill NAMES name for Ixhill in 1533
Ocley NAMES name for Oakley in 1525
Okeley NAMES name for Oakley in 1607
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: before 1860
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Little London. First Mentioned: 1845
Addingrove PLACE within the parish
Catsbrain (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Ixhill PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 305
1811 329
1821 382
1831 413
1841 391
1851 425
1861 420
1871 442
1881 421
1891 445
1901 398
1911 411
1921 327
1931 337
1941 N/A
1951 445
1961 496
1971 792
1981 902
1991 995

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Oakley   St Mary   Baptisms   1604   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Oakley   St Mary   Marriages   1604   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Oakley   St Mary   Burials   1604   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Oakley         Oakley     1880     1929     Yes     Admissions Register
    Oakley         Oakley     1929             Punishment book
    Oakley         Oakley     1929             Admissions Register
    Oakley         Oakley     1940             Logbook
    Oakley         Oakley     1940            
    Oakley         Oakley     1968     1972         Logbook
    Oakley         Oakley     1972             Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SMYTH HAWES HAWES HAWES
2 OVETTS EBORN BROOKS BROOKS
3 ALLEN WINTER EBORN EBORN
4 GURDEN SMITH NIXEY SHIRLEY
5 COPE BROOKS SHIRLEY GLADDY
6 DARVALL HAWS GLADDY NIXEY
7 WICKSON SHIRLEY BOYLES COLEMAN
8 ROBINSON GLADDY HIGGS BOYLES
9 PYME TURNER MORTEMORE MORTEMORE
10 PEDYNGTON JENNINGS COLEMAN HIGGS

 

Notes

Oakley is a small village of some 1300 inhabitants, situated at the foot of Brill hill between Thame and Bicester on the B4011. Many years ago it was almost surrounded by woodland and forests which were used by royalty to hunt wild boar - hence the name Boarstall, our adjoining village, from as early as Saxon times. Oakley is mentioned in the Domesday Book as 'Acheleia' and later records call it 'Ockley'.

There are many interesting houses in the village including the Elizabethan College Farm House which has a wealth of old beams and an unusual open inglenook fireplace upstairs. Oakley House used to be a hunting lodge and was rebuilt as it is today in 1660 after being burned down. It has some very interesting stone mullion windows. The Paddock Cottage has the round back of the old bread oven showing on the outside wall. Manor Farm is a very imposing farmhouse overlooking the Nap with its moat opposite the church. Hedges Farm was built in the late 17th century in red and blue bricks and has a wealth of interior beams. The Old Cottages dates also from the 17th century and was converted from three cottages. The beamed ceilings are very low and the house also features some large open fireplaces. In the centre of the village there is The Old Forge dated 1892. There have been many modern developments and numerous old cottages have been restored and enlarged.
The general appearance of the village changed enormously due to the scourge of Dutch elm disease which left Oakley very open and flat. However the chestnuts around the church and the Manor are a pleasure to all. Sadly the Sequoia tree in the old vicarage garden which had been a landmark for miles around was destroyed by lightning in 1985.
Our church is a very charming and peaceful place despite being on the main road. It has been developed over many centuries, the Nave being 12th century, the north aisle, chancel, sanctuary and south transept early 14th century, various windows are 15th and 16th century and a modern porch has been added on the south door.
The chief form of industry in the past was agriculture, but now most people seek their fortune in Oxford, Aylesbury, Bicester and London.

The hide-out of the notorious Great Train Robbers of the 1960s is Oakley's rather dubious claim to fame. Situated on the outskirts of the village, Leatherslade Farm was very well hidden on a lonely hillside up a narrow track, the house completely surrounded by trees. Now the big elms have all gone and the building can be seen from the main road.

The robbers took up residence some three months before the robbery and used the village stores for some of their supplies. The padlocking of the track gate onto the road immediately after the robbery gave the only clue to their whereabouts.
The peace of the village is threatened today by the proposed extension of the M40 motorway, which it is planned to run within I.5 miles of the village centre.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Oakley from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 2,250 acres; population, 421; rateable value, £2,813. The parish was included in the Forest of Bernword, and its name, spelt variously, Acleia, Acklai, Ocley, Okeley, and Oakley, is taken from two Saxon words signifying oak-trees, and a plain. The soil is a deep tenacious dark clay, with gravel and various loams.

The village is much scattered and lies in a wide spreading valley, 6 miles N.W. by N. from Thame, and 1.5 mile S.W. from Brill. The views from the road on the hill leading to Brill, are extensive.

The Manor House, situated nearly opposite the church, on its west side, is a plainly built ediface of brick, with a tiled roof. It was formerly moated and part of the moat remains. The pleasure grounds at the back are extensive and prettily laid out. The house is now the residence of Richard Tetley, Esq.

At the S.W. end of the village is an interesting looking old house with a gable in front, in which are two large mullioned windows - one above the other - with a shield above the upper window bearing the date, 1660, and the initials E.J.A. Over the doorway is a curious circular window. All the fire- places in the old part of the house, have stone jambs and elliptic arches.

The Vicarage House, a neat but small red brick building, is situated on the north side of the church-yard.

There is a recently erected Independent Chapel of red brick. The National School, about the centre of the village, was erected in 1859 by the present Vicar, and is a neat structure of red brick, with stone dressings. It includes a residence for the teacher. About 65 children attend on the average.

Education

Oakley Parish (Pop. 413)

Two Sunday Schools; one with 40 males and 25 females,
who attend the Established Church; the other consists of 5 males and 23 females, appertaining to Baptists; in both, the children receive gratuitous instruction;

There are also Five Lace Schools, consisting of 16 males and 41 females who are also taught to read.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.