Pitstone

Introduction

Pitstone Parish

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Berkhampstead

Size (acres): 1655

Easting & Northing: 494214

Grid Ref SP940140 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Pitstone PARISH St Mary
Pidlesthorne NAMES name for Pitstone in 1743
Pightlesthorn NAMES name for Pitstone in 1826
Pightlesthorne NAMES name for Pitstone in 1825
Pincelestorne NAMES name for Pitstone in Domesday Book in 1086
Pincenestorne NAMES name for Pitstone in Domesday Book in 1086
Pittelsthorne NAMES name for Pitstone in 1766
Pittleshorn NAMES name for Pitstone in 1526
Pychesthorne NAMES name for Pitstone in 1593
Pytcheleythorne NAMES name for Pitstone in 1536
Barley End PLACE within the parish
Duncombe End PLACE within the parish
Yardley (Fm) PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 275
1811 288
1821 353
1831 436
1841 424
1851 438
1861 457
1871 479
1881 433
1891 459
1901 396
1911 435
1921 372
1931 363
1941 N/A
1951 544
1961 766
1971 1147
1981 1665
1991 1909

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Pitstone   St Mary   Baptisms   1576   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Pitstone   St Mary   Marriages   1576   1919   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Pitstone   St Mary   Burials   1600   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 GLENISTER COLLINS TOMPKINS TOMPKINS
2 BREWER TOMPKINS JELLIS COLLINS
3 NOARE COLLYER COLLYER COLLYER
4 IVES SEABROOK COLLINS JELLIS
5 DURRANT GLENISTER WILLIAMSON GLENISTER
6 SEARE COOK TREACHER WILLIAMSON
7 BRIDGEWATER SMITH COKER SEABROOK
8 CRAWLEY FENN MESSENGER TREACHER
9 DUNCOMBE COCK BRIDGEWATER LONDON
10 SAWELL WAKEMAN ARCHER BRIDGEWATER

Notes

Pitstone was a very small village until the advent of the Tunnel Cement Company in the late 1940s. The company quarries chalk from land to the south west of the village and uses it in the manufacture of cement. This provided employment and more houses were soon needed to house the influx of cement workers.


The area of houses and shops which is always referred to as Pitstone is in fact Pitstone Green. Pitstone itself consists of about fifty houses grouped near Pitstone church half a mile to the south west of Pitstone Green.

Pitstone is proud to boast the oldest surviving post-mill in the country. The mill dates back to 1624, according to documentary references and has been reconstructed from the timbers of the original mill. The mill is owned by the National Trust and was restored by the local history society.

The mill stands on land owned by the Hawkins family of Pitstone Green Farm, who have farmed this land continuously since 1808. Some of the farm buildings house the Pitstone Green Farm Museum which exhibits rural and domestic bygones, farm implements and machinery and details of local history and archaeological finds.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Description

Description of Pitstone from J.J.Sheahan, 1861.

The parish Pitstone , or Piglesthorne (more recently spelt Pightlesthorne, Pincelestorne, Pittlesthorn, and Pittleston) is situated on the eastern verge of the county, adjoining Hertfordshire. With its hamlets its area is 2,836 acres; population, 545; rateable value, £2.610. The parish is about seven miles in length, and one in breadth. The soil is, for the most part, chalk, with a great abundance of flints; and there are about 120 acres of woodland. The Icknield Way crosses this parish as the road leading from Dunstable towards Wendover. The London and North Western Railway, and the Grand Junction Canal pass through a corner of the parish.

The village is much scattered and lies 9 miles W. from Aylesbury, 6 miles N.E. from Berkhamstead, and 4 miles N. from Tring Railway Station. The houses of the parishes of Pitstone and Ivinghoe nearly adjoin - Whistle Brook (a corruption of Muscle-brook) forming the division. This brook is famous for the growth of water cresses; and the locality is noted for the growth of Damsons. Many thousand ducks of the Aylesbury breed are reared here every year; and many of the females find employment in making straw plat. In 1856, the remaining open lands of the parish were inclosed, when four acres, called "the green" were allotted as a recreation ground for the villagers. A new carriage road leading to the church on its north side was then formed. It is intended to build a number of cottages on the sides of this road.

The Parsonage House erected in 1856, is a Gothic building of white brick with black brick dressings, and is pleasantly situated on high ground a short distant from the church, called the Heath; but in the parish of Ivinghoe.

The school is a handsome Gothic building of white and red brick, built in 1860, at the expense of Earl Brownlow. It stands on one side of the before-mentioned new road to the church, and the teacher's house is on the opposite side of the road. The late Countess of Bridgewater left £10 a year to this school.

The Town Lands for the use of the parish, consists of a few cottages and about thirteen acres of land. At the inclosure in 1856, three acres were awarded to the poor.

Education

Pitstone Parish (Pop. 436)

Two Sunday Schools, both supported by voluntary contributions; in one are 55 children of both sexes, who attend the Established Church; the other (commenced 1833) appertains to Methodists, and consists of 8 children; most of the above children attend a straw-plait School during the week, and are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

Nettlesden and Friesden Chapelry (Pop. 142)

One Sunday School, with 24 males and 14 females, supported by the clergyman;

There is also a small School, in which about 18 children are taught lace-making.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833