Slapton

Introduction

Church: St Botolph

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 1211

Easting & Northing: 493220

Grid Ref SP930200 Click to see map

 

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Slapton PARISH St Botolph
Slapetone NAMES name for Slapton in Domesday Book in 1086
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1817. Building sold 1960
Horton (Part) PLACE within the parish
Whaddon PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 228
1811 202
1821 312
1831 360
1841 336
1851 298
1861 325
1871 325
1881 265
1891 214
1901 161
1911 211
1921 175
1931 143
1941 N/A
1951 237
1961 245
1971 343
1981 484
1991 464

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Slapton   St Botolph   Baptisms   1575   1902   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Slapton   St Botolph   Marriages   1576   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Slapton   St Botolph   Burials   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 JANE TURNEY TURNEY TURNEY
2 TURNEY BUCKMASTER HELEY BUCKMASTER
3 ROBERTS EAMES EVANS HELEY
4 SEARCH RADWELL BUCKMASTER EVANS
5 EAMES FOUNTAIN WESLEY EAMES
6 BUCKMASTER HOWES SEABROOK SEABROOK
7 KNIGHT SEABROOK SAYELL SAYELL
8 TURNY JANES JANES JANES
9 TURNER SEABROOKE ROWE JANE
10 THEED WHITE HOLMES WESLEY

 

Notes

Within living memory Slapton was a self contained village with three farms, a brickyard, church and chapel, school, shop, mill, a blacksmith, cobbler, baker and brewer. The rector lived in a gracious house set in large grounds.

Today the village is luckier than most as it still has a post office stores, a school for the younger children, a pub and a church. The farms remain too, but the Maltings are used by the publican as a store.

The church remains steadfast, standing every spring-time in a sea of cowslips watching over the community as it has done since 1223. The name of Turney is a village name to this day and many of the gravestones, lichened and leaning, carry the surnames of today's villagers, reflecting the continuity of village life, despite the much talked about influx of townies and commuters.

Most of the inhabitants are commuters these days as there is very little work within the village boundaries. So the village is a quiet place during the day as people go far afield to earn their living, many travelling to London from nearby Cheddington station. However, despite the daily exodus, the village is a thriving place with organisations catering for all age groups.

Rising crime rate in rural areas was responsible for the formation of a Village Watch Scheme which has now become Neighbourhood Watch now that these schemes are official in the county. This has increased our community spirit making us all more aware of one another. 1986 marked our first entry into the Best Kept Village competition.

The village administers its own charity which has been in existence for 400 years and is named after Sir Thomas Knyghton, a former Rector of Holy Cross Church. The charity books record the giving of shoes, petticoats, wood for the fire, tools to learn a trade, weekly sick benefits, money for learning to sing the psalms, and — ultimately — a coffin to the poor and needy. There is not such obvious poverty today but the Trustees continue the caring work mindful of the example set by their predecessors.

There are ghosts of course, what village would be complete without them? An old lady, dressed in black and carrying a basket wanders along the route of a defunct footpath; the moonlight glints on the buckles of a Rector's shoes, all that can be seen of him as he rushes to an ancient affray; a young girl runs in one direction and her horse gallops in another as they search endlessly for one another and in one of the old cottages children cry.

The Northamptonshire Mercury records the trial of a witch on July 2nd 1770. She was to have been tried by water ordeal and weighing against the Bible at the mill in Slapton but the miller declined to carry out the trial before so many spectators, but promised to do it later in private.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Slapton, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

The area of Slapton, according to the Parliamentary Return, is 840 acres, its population is 325, and the rateable value is £2,436. The parish includes part of the hamlet of Horton, and is intersected by the Grand Junction Canal. The London and North-Western Railway passes within a mile of the church, occupying a small portion of the parish. The soil is a deep stiff clay. The village is small and rather scattered, and lies 3.5 miles S. of Leighton Buzzard, Co. Beds.

There is no manor-house; but about the centre of the village is a genteel residence erected in 1820, and repaired and enlarged in 1861. This is in the occupation of Mr. D. Lee Ginger.

There are extensive works for the manufacture of bricks, draining tiles, etc. here. The living is a Rectory, rated in the King's Books at £14 9s 7d. Its present nett value is £330 per annum. Patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ Church, Oxford; Rector Rev. --- Little. The Abbesses of Barking presented to the Rectory before the Reformation. The Theeds sold the advowson, in 1720, to the Duke of Chandos; of whom, in 1729, it was purchased by Christ Church.

The Rectory House was rebuilt by the Rev. George Baxter, Rector from 1725 to 1737. It is a spacious and lofty building, of brick, situated a short distance westward from the church.

The school, in the vicinity of the church and parsonage, is a small neat building, of white brick, with cut stone dressings. It was erected in 1852, at the of the Countess of Bridgewater, who endowed it with £5 per annum. The Wesleyan Chapel is a red brick edifice, built in 1817.

Education

Slapton Parish (Pop. 360)

Two Sunday Schools, one with 30 males and 18 females, who attend the Established Church; the other (commenced about 1818), 28 males and 35 females, attached to Wesleyan Methodists; both supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.