Steeple Claydon

Introduction

Church: St Michael and All Angels

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 3329

Easting & Northing: 469226

Grid Ref SP690260 Click to see map

Names

Places

NameTypeNote
Steeple Claydon PARISH St Michael and All Angels
Claindone NAMES name for Steeple Claydon in Domesday Book in 1086
Stuble Claydon NAMES name for Steeple Claydon in 1541
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1820. Rebuilt 1862, 1893
Blackmoor Hill PLACE within the parish
Kingsbridge (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Redland Bridge PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 646
1811 704
1821 804
1831 881
1841 849
1851 869
1861 946
1871 906
1881 852
1891 780
1901 721
1911 840
1921 741
1931 708
1941 N/A
1951 1015
1961 1079
1971 1225
1981 1641
1991 2234

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Steeple Claydon   St Michael & All Angels   Baptisms   1575   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Steeple Claydon   St Michael & All Angels   Marriages   1575   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Steeple Claydon   St Michael & All Angels   Burials   1575   1899   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SNOW STEVENS STEVENS STEVENS
2 CHURCHILL KING BECKETT BECKETT
3 WOOTTON SMITH THORPE KING
4 COX CLARK SEAR WEBB
5 KING BUTCHER PERKINS SEAR
6 BARTON BULL WEBB THORPE
7 TAYLOR WEBB WHITE WHITE
8 CARTER MILLER QUAINTON PERKINS
9 KINGE BROWN PARADINE INWOOD
10 KYNG INWOOD CARTER QUAINTON

 

Notes

The steeple on St Michael's church can be seen as one approaches the village. Many believe mistakenly that Steeple Claydon is so called because of this, but the manor of Stepul Claydone is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The steeple and tower were not built until the mid-19th century.


Calvert clay has a lot to do with the growth of this village for its prosperity came after the brickworks were built. Work on these began in 1898 and production of bricks started in 1900. Today over 500 people work there although at one time the London Brick Company (as it was then) employed over 1,000 people and was the
main employer in the district. Although the brickworks are at Calvert, Steeple Claydon became the village which grew around it. The reason being that it was the village with a sewerage system and a piped water supply. The village continues to grow and at the last census taken, had a population of 1,692.

There are five public houses in the village. There is an old jingle about them which goes thus:

'The Black Horse kicked the Crown
and drank the Fountain dry,
The Sportsman shot the Prince of Wales
and made the Phoenix fly'.

The Black Horse has been non-existent for many years, but Bull Lane where it once stood is likely to be remembered, for nearby is a small estate named for obvious reasons Taurus Close.

Many villagers came and settled here after the Second World War when prefabricated bungalows were erected to house the brickworkers, who were given priority on local council housing lists as there was such a demand for bricks to rebuild the bombed towns and cities of Britain, and homes were desperately needed for the ex-servicemen returning home.

At the time, it seemed odd to house brickworkers in aluminium prefabs imported from America, but many were grateful for the accommodation afforded which had every 'mod-con'. These included a hot and cold water system, with bath, and the then ultimate luxury (in the villages anyway) of a fitted kitchen with a refrigerator!

The credit for the growth of the village into the thriving community it now is may be attributed to three local councillors, all now deceased, who had the vision and ambition to improve it. Oddly enough, two of these, Mr Tom Mitchinson and Mr Allan Shaw, originated from the North-East of England. The new school, the third phase of its building still to be completed, was named after county-councillor Shaw. Councillors Tom 'Mitch' as he was affectionately known, and George Beckett worked tirelessly for the village and organized many events to raise money to improve the recreation ground, build a new pavilion and provide a childrens' corner.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Steeple Claydon, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of Steeple Claydon covers an area of 3,270 acres; population, 946; rateable value, £3,368. The Buckinghamshire Railway occupies 31 acres of land in its course through the parish, and has a station here; and the new railway from Aylesbury to Buckingham will join the Buckinghamshire line at Claydon.

The village, which is distant 5.5 miles W. of Winslow, and 6 miles S from Buckingham, is in two distinct parts – one portion being seated on the clayey hill from which the place derives its appellation; and the other in a deep hollow. There are at present no less than forty-two proprietors of land in this parish, the principal being Sir Harry Verney, Bart., M.P. (Lord of the Manor), Mr. William Clarke, the Executors of the late J. Stevens, Esq., William Cresswell, Esq., Mr B. Dodge, W. Warner, Esq., the Executors of Messrs. J. Butterfield and T. Harper, and Mr. John King.
v The Manor House, one of the seats of the Chaloners, was, according to Lipscomb, “a large building of timber and plaster, near the church.” About the year 1720, the same author states, it was rebuilt with brick, and converted into a farm house. On the same site now stands a genteel residence in the Gothic style, occupied by Mr. Alexander Fraser, land agent to Sir Harry Verney. The place is called Oliver's Camp.

The Living is a Vicarage, consolidated and united into one benefice, with the Vicarage of East Claydon, in 1821. The advowson ans Rectory belonged to Oseney Abbey before the reformation, and since then they have been appendant to the manor. The tithes were commuted for land and a corn-rent in 1795, when the parish was inclosed.

The Vicarage House, a neat building of red brick, situated in the village on the brow of a hill, is occupied by the officiating curate Sir Thomas Chaloner the regicide, in the year 1656, built a school-house here, and endowed it with £12 per annum; but the endowment has been lost. The present school is a neat brick structure, from the roof of which rises a turret containing a clock and bell. In the wall of one of the schoolrooms is inserted a brass plate, illuminated, inscribed thus, “This school-room was built at the expense of the Right Hon. Lady Dunsany, aunt of Lady Verney. Opened November 1856.” Adjoining is a residence for the schoolmistress. Up to 100 girls and infants attend. The boys of the parish attend the school at Middle Claydon.

Education

Steeple Claydon Parish (Pop. 881)

One Infant School, consisting of 35 boys and 34 girls (commenced 1828), supported by Miss Calvert, who allows a yearly salary and a residence for the mistress, in addition to which each child pays one penny per week.

One Daily School, containing 32 males, whose instruction is paid for by
their parents ; this School was endowed by Thomas Chaloner in 1656, but the endowment has long been lost.

One Sunday School, in which 92 males and 90 females are gratuitously instructed.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.