Stoke Mandeville

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 1773

Easting & Northing: 483210

Grid Ref SP830100 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Stoke Mandeville PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Stoches NAMES name for Stoke Mandeville in Domesday Book in 1086
Stoke Mandil NAMES name for Stoke Mandeville in 1676
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1815. Rebuilt 1868
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1823
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST . First Mentioned: 1838
Halling (lost) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 248
1811 341
1821 402
1831 461
1841 493
1851 538
1861 477
1871 528
1881 497
1891 480
1901 411
1911 309
1921 471
1931 606
1941 N/A
1951 811
1961 1217
1971 1247
1981 2446
1991 4889

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Stoke Mandeville   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1605   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
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Yes,
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Stoke Mandeville   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1605   1840   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Stoke Mandeville   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1606   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BROWNE SMITH SMITH SMITH
2 SMITH WHITCHURCH SPITTLES SPITTLES
3 BRILL BROWN BENNION WHITCHURCH
4 HOARE FORD RUTLAND GURNEY
5 DANCER BROWNE BAKER BAKER
6 GARDNER GREEN GURNEY BENNION
7 MARTIN GOODSPEED TAPPING RUTLAND
8 JACKSON BRILL NORTH ALLEN
9 SHERFIELD ELDRIDGE BATES GREEN
10 HARDING GURNEY FOSTER BROWNE

 

 

Notes

Stoke Mandeville is of course known nationwide for the hospital for spinal injuries. But the village has its own attractions.

The church of St Mary the Virgin is in the heart of the old village. Built in 1866 to replace the even older ruined church in the fields, it stands in a lovingly tended churchyard, surrounded by sweetly scented lime trees. Originally there were five bells; during the time Rev. Winterton was vicar three more were installed. The belfry is now unsafe, so no ringing is heard at present. Inside the simple, cool interior is a monument to Dorothy Brudenell — whose father was once Lord of the Manor. Her likeness is embroidered on the banner of the Stoke Mandeville Women's Institute.

Across the green, part of the ancient Common Land, is the village school. The original part of the building is still in use and bears the date 1898. All the children were taught in the two rooms. Now the much enlarged premises house the County Combined School with almost 300 pupils.

In the past, a grand party took place here each New Year's Eve. The partition between the rooms folded back — the tortoise stove well stoked — tea urn bubbling — home-made cakes and lemonade laid ready — the fun would begin.
To the music of fiddle and piano, all the old dances — Sir Roger - Lancers — Veleta, interspersed with games of trencher, Nuts in May etc. would raise the temperature, and the dust, until everyone was glad to rest. So until midnight, when, outside in the cold night air Ring out wild bells would be sung to welcome the New Year.

Manor Cottage next to the school is one of the lovely 18th century cottages and beyond, near the entrance to the allotments, is where the Bell Pond — now regretfully filled in, was situated.

Across the allotments in Marsh Lane is the present-day wheelwright's yard. Most of his work is to keep in repair pony traps and other light vehicles still to be seen occasionally in the lanes.

In Risborough Road, heavy container lorries from the continent and the many fast cars make it difficult to cross! The road here is wide and part of the old common land provides an open green with lovely silver birch trees and the copper beech planted to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. Less than 50 years ago the quiet roads were lined with magnificient elms, and deep ditches either side carried storm water to the ponds and streams.

Round the corner is the 15th century Old Thatch next to The Bull, where in the past much business was transacted over a pint! The three old cottages under one rooftree which stand next, are required to pay the sum of £l per annum in tithe under the terms of the Jackson Charity dated 1726!

Our hairdresser has a shop opposite the church, where Pargeters general store once supplied most of the villagers' everyday needs in the 1930s. Older residents will remember it being dominated by the wonderful smell - spice, tea, coffee, herbs, polishes, vegetables etc. Sugar and dried goods were weighed on brass scales and put into blue or brown 'made' paper bags.

Children of that era were allowed round the corner of the counter to spend their Saturday pennies. Gob stoppers, sherbert dabs, liquorice and boiled sweets at 4 oz for a penny! Times have changed!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Stoke Mandeville, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

According to the Census Report the area of this parish is 1460 acres. Its rateable value is £1,994. Population 478. The soil is chiefly a stiff clay upon a marl or blue clay sub-soil. The village is a nearly a mile in length, and contains several genteel residences (occupied chiefly by farmers,) and a number of humble cottages. One of the houses is rendered conspicuous on account of an ancient yew tree in front off it, which is cut and kept neatly trimmed in a fantastic manner. Stoke Mandeville is 3 miles S.E. of Aylesbury. This place and Buckland were formerly Chapelries to Bierton Church, but in 1858 they were separated, and made an independent parish. The Living of Stoke Mandeville-cum-Buckland is now a Vicarage worth £120 a year, and the Rev. Charles Edward Partington is the Vicar. The parish was inclosed under an Act of Parliament passed in 1797, when land was allotted in lieu of the great tithes, and a corn rent assigned on the small tithes.

The Vicarage House, erected in 1860-1, stands at the entrance to the village, and is a good building of brick, faced with stone, and in the Gothic style. Its site (half an acre of land) was given gratuitously by Mr. Thomas Gurney, of this parish, who also gave a site for a school some years ago. The cost of the Parsonage to its completion was about £1,100 – the contract for the house alone, minus gates, papering, laying out of ground etc. being £954. The design of the building was by a Mr. D. Brandon, the county architect.

The Parish School, a very neat building of red brick with white brick facings, was erected by subscription in 1843, on a site given, as above stated, by Mr. Gurney. The Methodist Chapel was built in 1840, and is a red brick structure.

Education

Stoke Mandeville Parish (Pop. 461)

One Daily School, in which 15 males are instructed at the expense of their parents.

One Evening and Sunday National School, containing 20 males and 17 females, supported by subscription.

There are also three small Schools, in which 32 females are taught lace-making and to read.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.