Taplow

Introduction

Church: St Nicholas

Hundred: Burnham

Poor Law District: Eton

Size (acres): 1762

Easting & Northing: 491182

Grid Ref SU910820 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Taplow PARISH St Nicholas
Clifden NAMES name for Cliveden in 1826
Hartley Court Mote NAMES name for Hardicanute's Moat in 17th C
Thapeslau NAMES name for Taplow in Domesday Book in 1086
Topler NAMES name for Taplow in 1675
Toplo NAMES name for Taplow in 1571
Toplowe NAMES name for Taplow in 1624
Amerden Grove PLACE within the parish
Cliveden PLACE within the parish
Dilehurst (lost) PLACE within the parish
Huntercombe House PLACE within the parish
Lent PLACE within the parish
Pennlands (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Summerlins Wood PLACE within the parish
West Town (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 422
1811 592
1821 586
1831 647
1841 744
1851 704
1861 811
1871 1028
1881 1063
1891 1029
1901 1056
1911 1127
1921 1502
1931 1031
1941 N/A
1951 2228
1961 2183
1971 2329
1981 2172
1991 1637

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Taplow   St Nicolas   Baptisms   1604   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Taplow   St Nicolas   Marriages   1616   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Taplow   St Nicolas   Burials   1605   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RUSSELL BROWN BROWN BROWN
2 PALMER CLARK SIMMONDS SIMMONDS
3 JONES ALLEN JAYCOCK SMITH
4 GROVE ALDRIDGE SMITH JAYCOCK
5 FLATT SMITH KENT MEADS
6 EDMONDS LUCAS MEADS JONES
7 POOLE NEIGHBOUR HARRIS KENT
8 HOWE MARCH JONES HARRIS
9 BECKE READ FIELD NEWMAN
10 CHIPS BISHOP SAUNDERS FIELD

 

Description

A settlement at Taplow has been in existence since the Stone Age, as shown by the finding of artifacts of that period. Its name is derived from that of a Saxon chief, Tappa, whose burial mound is evident. Saxon objects have been excavated and these, along with earlier finds, are now housed in the British Museum.

Taplow has remained a village, with its church, school, hall, inn and some old dwelling houses around the green. High above the beautiful stretch of the Thames known as Cliveden Reach, where the river separates Taplow from Maidenhead, is Taplow Court with its well laid out gardens. The original manor house was on this site, the estate was more extensive, including what is today Cliveden estate.

In the grounds of Taplow Court is Bapsey Pond where, it is claimed, St Birinius baptised his followers in Roman times. This is near the burial mound where a service is held at dawn on Easter Day. The church, St Nicolas, stood on the estate until 1828, when it was demolished and rebuilt on its present site in the centre of the village. It is one of several churches served by a team ministry.

The manor house changed in appearance through the ages. In the 17th century it ceased to be Crown property, being sold to Sir William Hampson in the reign of James I. He in turn sold off the part which became Cliveden. It was last renovated by Pascoe Grenfell in 1855 to give it the Gothic appearance we see today. It is now used for industrial prposes. What beautiful surroundings in which to work!

So was established an area of large houses, with a village of cottagers serving the big houses. In the 19th and early 20th centuries there were four shops, a post office and the inn, the Oak and Saw. Conditions in the village have changed — shops and post office have disappeared, but services are infrequent and the railway station, though nearer than originally, sited as it was at the Dumbbell Hotel, is still a distance away. Quite a lot of building has been carried out since the Second World War, the houses mainly occupied by reasonably affluent people who work away from the village, many commuting to the City. The station has always carried commuters to London. In early times noble Lords travelled to the Houses of Parliament, hence the name of Noblemen's Corner. Just after the First World War the local village simpleton noted that they all wore bowler hats. He asked the village bobby whether he too could wear one, and was told that he needed a licence!

The present Cliveden House, the third on the site, was designed by Sir Charles Barry. It was bought from the Duke of Westminster by William Waldorf, later Lord Astor, in 1893. He had the beautiful water gardens laid out. It continued to be lived in by his family until 1966, though the estate had been given to the National Trust in 1942. Before the Second World War Lord Astor's son and daughter-in-law, Nancy, made it the centre for the literary and political society of the day, 'The Cliveden Set'. There were scandalous tales told both at that time and earlier, in Edwardian times, when there was a row of houses let to ladies who frequented the famous Skindles hotel on the riverside.

Stamford University leased part of the house from the National Trust for fourteen years. It is now a very luxurious, expensive hotel.
In the Cliveden estate the Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital was built during the Second World War, though in the Great War there had been a hospital unit established there. After the war it became a Health Service hospital until 1984. There was great sadness when it was closed, as it was very much a 'family' hospital.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Taplow, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 1,920 acres; population 811. The parish is separated by the Thames from Berkshire; the Great Western Railway passes through it; and within its boundary is the Maidenhead Station on that line. The village, which occupies a pleasant situation 1.5 E from Maidenhead, is lighted with gas.

Taplow Court, the seat of C.P. Grenfell, Esq., is a very old mansion. The Earl of Orkney improved it; and the present owner restored the old parts, added the principle appartments to the south-west, rebuilt the four fronts, and most of the offices. It is now a splendid pile, of red brick with cut stone finishings in the Tudor style. From the centre rises a lofty square tower which contains a water tank; and two of the angles are ornamental with spirelets. A porch and vestibule leads to a beautiful Norman Saloon (built by the Earl of Orkney) 38ft by 16ft. Here are polished marble pillars supporting eight large ornamental arches; and above (reached by the great staircase) by polished marble shafts. The lofty roof is formed of oak and rolled plate glass. The principal apartments in the house are spacious and well proportioned.

The Rectory is rated at £11 18s 9d. and returned at £329 per annum. Patron, the Lord Chancellor; Rector, Rev. Charles Whateley, who is also Rural Dean of the Deanery of Burnham. At the inclosure of the parish, land was allotted in lieu of tithes. There are about 196 acres of glebe.

Education

Taplow Parish (Pop. 647)

One Daily School (commenced 1833), consisting of 15 males and 13 females, who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.