Thornborough

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 2392

Easting & Northing: 474233

Grid Ref SP740330 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Thornborough PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Torneberge NAMES name for Thornborough in domesday Book in 1086
Tuiforde NAMES name for Twyford in Domesday Book in 1086
High Calvanist NON-CONFORMIST Lower End. First Mentioned: 1829. Converted for agricultural use
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1872
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST Chapel Lane. First Mentioned: 1832. Converted to house
Coombs PLACE within the parish
Hatchetleys (lost) PLACE within the parish
Sheldspit (Fms) PLACE within the parish
Thornborough Mill PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 458
1811 539
1821 572
1831 673
1841 762
1851 754
1861 694
1871 687
1881 577
1891 564
1901 481
1911 443
1921 440
1931 420
1941 N/A
1951 481
1961 472
1971 568
1981 542
1991 566

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Thornborough   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1602   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Thornborough   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1602   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Thornborough   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1602   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
click here

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Thornborough         Thornborough     1899     1947     Yes     Admissions Register
    Thornborough         Thornborough     1874     1899     Yes     Logbook
    Thornborough         Thornborough     1899     1965     Yes     Logbook
    Thornborough     Infants     Thornborough     1896     1905     Yes     Logbook
    Thornborough     Mixed     Thornborough     1965     1990         Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 POLLARD ADAMS KING KING
2 ADAMS KING RIDGWAY ADAMS
3 PURSELL RIDGWAY CAPEL RIDGWAY
4 ADDAMS SHOULER BROOKS BROOKS
5 WOOLHEAD FRENCH DILLOW CAPEL
6 CARTER TURVEY CRANWELL CRANWELL
7 FRENCH BROOKS MILLER DILLOW
8 JEFFS ADCOCK HOWARD MILLER
9 LUCAS MILLER SMITH SHOULER
10 UNDERWOOD POLLARD CLARK SMITH

Notes

Thornborough has been a farming community since before the Domesday Book, where it is recorded that in the manor there was land for 11 ploughs, or oxen teams, and a meadow for 4 ploughs. Thornborough parish had two large fields, East or Thornton Field, and West or Padbury Field, divided into strips or furlongs which were a unit of tenure. About 1325 a third field was carved out of these and called Mill Field. This gave a two-year crop rotation for the villagers, followed by a fallow or rest year.


On one of the highest points in the parish is the site of a windmill where corn was ground in the 17th century. The parish is bounded on the west side by the Claydon brook, a tributary of the river Ouse, which is spanned by a medieval bridge with six arches, by-passed now for modern traffic. Close by there are two ancient burial mounds.

In the centre of the village, between the 17th century manor, the village hall and the village school, stands St Mary's church. Parts of the south wall are believed to date from Saxon times, but the earliest records begin in the 12th century. In the floor of the nave, protected by the carpet, lies a fine brass dedicated to John and Isabel Barton. The tower houses a peal of five steel bells, which, after a silence of over thirty years, have been re-hung, and may be heard once more ringing joyously across the fields. The mechanisation of the tower clock brings to an end the labour of love of the verger, who has climbed up the tower by a vertical ladder every day for no less than sixty years to wind up the clock by hand.

The village hall was built in 1846, with money given by the Verney family of Botolph Claydon, for the purpose of teaching the children the scriptures. Incorporated in the hall was a two-bedroom house for the schoolmaster. Up to 126 children were taught in the hall at any one time. After the present school building took its place in 1910, the hall was used, as it still is today, for village functions such as dances and whist drives.

Many of the village families have roots in Thornborough which go back for many generations. Whereas there are now only two public houses and one shop, many of the present-day inhabitants can remember the days when there were several shops and inns. Some 50 years ago, the old bakehouse played an important role in village life. On Sundays at about 10.30 am husbands and a few sons could be seen dressed in their best navy blue serge suits, with white shirt and navy tie, and probably a pork pie hat, wending their way towards the bakehou,se. They bore a large tray with the Sunday joint in a meat tin, the Yorkshire pudding mixture, and another dish containing potatoes to be roasted, and also the weekly fruit cake mixture, the whole covered with a clean cloth, all to be baked in the bread oven. There was of course no electricity and very few people had a decent oven of their own. When the men had deposited their trays, they broke into two groups, one of which would congregate under the horse chestnut tree outside the bakehouse, and the other under the dole tree. At five minutes to eleven, the bakehouse group would disperse, one group to chapel and the other group to church. At 12.30 pm they would go and collect the Sunday lunches that had been cooked for them. The charge for this service was two old pennies.

Today the village is smaller than it used to be. The farms are still there but they don't need as much labour. Some residents are commuters to nearby towns. But village life is alive and well. The village community assembles for its annual rituals; the fete, the sports day, the donkey derby. Modern traffic must sit and wait for the team of morris dancers to finish its display. And the ducks are still swimming on the village pond.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

 

Description of Thornborough, from J.J. Sheahan, 1861.

 

The area of this parish is 2,530 acres; population, 694; rateable value, about £2,500. The village is seated in a hollow and much scattered. A stream of water passes through it, crossing it twice in its course. The place is 3.5 miles E of Buckingham. There are extensive brick and tile works here. The manor house, east of the church, is a large commodious building of stone, which, in 1860, underwent thorough repair. It is surrounded by a garden and an ancient brick wall; on the outside of which is a large old “Tithe barn” The Magdalen College Manor House is on the west side of the church, and is an ancient building of stone, with a tiled roof. The walls denote great strength, and the ancient porch and the two mullioned windows still remain. The battle fought on the banks of the Ouse, near Buckingham, between the sons of Cymbeline and the Roman General, Aulus Plautius, is conjectured to have taken place at Thornborough Bridge. The living is a Vicarage, rated at £8 17s. in the King's Books, and now worth £95 per year. Patron, Sir Harry Verney, Bart.; Vicar, Rev. Daniel Watkins. In 1778, the living was augmented by Queen's Anne's Bounty, with £200, by lot. In 1797, under an Inclosure Act, an allotment was made to the impropriator, of lay rector: another to the family of Lowndes, as proprietors of certain tithes; and a corn rent was assigned to the Vicar, with an allotment of about fifteen acres of land. The chancel belongs to Dr. Clark, M.D. and Mr. G. Wilkinson, as owners of certain tithes. The Wesleyans and Huntingtonians have each a Chapel here; that belonging to the former body was erected by Mr. William King, in 1832. The National School was built in 1840, and is attended by about 50 children. When the parish was inclosed an allotment of 16a. 1r. 20p. was awarded to the poor in lieu of common rights; and at the same time an allotment of 5a 19p was assigned by the church wardens in exchange for certain lands belonging to the church. Thornborough participates in Hill's Charity.

 

Education

Thornborough Parish (Pop. 673)

Two small Daily Schools, in which 7 boys and 5 girls are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Three Sunday Schools, one with 35 males and 20 females, who attend the Established Church; another consists of 10 males and 20 females, attached to Wesleyan Methodists; the other (commenced 1826), of 17 males and 17 females, to Independent Dissenters, all supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.