Wingrave

Introduction

Church: St Peter and St Paul

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2488

Easting & Northing: 486218

Grid Ref SP860180 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Wingrave PARISH St Peter and St Paul
Dryvers Knopp NAMES name for Nup End in 1546
Elstrap NAMES name for Helsthorpe 1766
Rowlsham NAMES name for Rowsham in 1538
Rowsome NAMES name for Rowsham in 1640
Withungrave NAMES name for Wingrave in Domesday Book in 1086
Witungrave NAMES name for Wingrave in Domesday Book in 1086
Congregational NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1805. Built 1832
Helsthorpe (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Nup End PLACE within the parish
Rowsham PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 602
1811 588
1821 675
1831 783
1841 814
1851 813
1861 863
1871 908
1881 903
1891 926
1901 827
1911 774
1921 706
1931 632
1941 N/A
1951 746
1961 832
1971 923
1981 N/A
1991 N/A

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Wingrave   St Peter & St Paul   Baptisms   1550   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wingrave   St Peter & St Paul   Marriages   1550   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wingrave   Congregational   Marriages   1839   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wingrave   Congregational   Burials   1826   1920   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Wingrave   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1588   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BATE MORTIMER BONHAM PAINE
2 LUCAS KEENE FLEET MORTIMER
3 GRACE KEEN HEDGES FLEET
4 THEED LUCAS PAINE BONHAM
5 GOODSPEED KEMPSTER ALCOCK HEDGES
6 SEABROOKE GRACE BATEMAN BATES
7 WHEELER BATES BADRICK KEMPSTER
8 PALMER PAINE RICKARD KEEN
9 KEENE WHEELER BATES GRIFFIN
10 KEMPSTER CHAPMAN MORTIMER BADRICK

 

Notes

In 1895 my Grandfather Jones built a house in Wingrave to serve as a post office as well as a home. Grandmother Jones was the postmistress.

Each morning a postman arrived at the post at 7.30am with the post, having cycled the six miles from Aylesbury. A local person then sorted and delivered the post in Wingrave. The postman cycled a further two miles to the neighbouring village of Aston Abbots to take their post.

The Wingrave post office was then open from 8.30am to 7pm. The postman returned to Wingrave at 11 am to meet with another postman who had cycled from Aylesbury to bring the second post. The first postman then himself delivered the second post in Wingrave before going again to Aston Abbotts with their second delivery. The second postman returned to Aylesbury with the outgoing mail from the two villages. The first postman went back from Wingrave (to Aylesbury) at 6 pm with the second collection of mail.

In 1905 Grandfather Jones died suddenly and I moved with my mother and father to live at the post office. It was an ABC Telegraph Office and very busy with telegrams. These were delivered to neighbouring villages and outlying farms.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "Buckinghamshire Within Living Memory" (1993) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

 

Wingrave is a hilltop village 5 miles north east of Aylesbury. It was first mentioned in the 9th century when a chapel was built at Withun's Grove (Withun's Wood). The main part of the original village surrounds the church on top of the hill where there is a pleasant green, a village pond and recreation ground with a splendid view of the Chilterns. The recreation ground was given to the village in 1922 by Lord Dalmeny, afterwards the 6th Lord Rosebery, of nearby Mentmore.


The population is about 1200, including a fair proportion of children. The inhabitants work in Aylesbury or Leighton Buzzard, with a few commuting daily to London, while the main employer in the village itself is the Maclntyre School, an establishment for mentally retarded children.

The parish church of SS. Peter and Paul stands on top of the hill and is easily visible from the surrounding vale. The present building dates from the 13 th century and has some medieval wall-paintings hidden in a narrow passage off the chancel. The church has a peal of six bells and there is an ancient 15 th century bell standing at the base of the tower, near the font which dates from 1190 and is the oldest item in the church.

The most famous local family connected with Wingrave are the Rothschilds, originally residing at Mentmore Towers and including Wingrave in the estate. In 1876 Hannah Rothschild built about 25 houses for farm workers in Wingrave, each bearing her insignia 'H de R' and the date. These are now all privately owned. In the 1860s she built Wingrave its very first school, later known as the Church Rooms and now divided into private dwellings. Mentmore Towers later passed into the hands of the Rosebery family and is now the British HQ of the Transcendental Meditation Movement.

In Victorian times the Stewart-Freeman family were well-known in the county and lived in the manor house of Wingrave. In 1905 there was a great scandal locally when the eldest Stewart-Freeman daughter eloped with the 8th Earl of Essex. The son born to them, Reginald, eventually became the 9th Earl of Essex, and lived with his wife at Floyds Farm, Wingrave, for some years. During the Second World War the manor house was occupied by the exiled Czech Government under Dr Eduard Benes. In gratitude for the hospitality they had received, the Czech Government built the bus shelter at the crossroads for the benefit of travellers. The manor house is today the Maclntyre School.

In the 1880s a Wingrave musician, George Griffin, composed an oratorio called Samuel and many hymn tunes. He was also the local postmaster and village baker. Earlier, in 1786, a wealthy Wingrave lady became famous when, lost in a storm between Wingrave and Rowsham, she was directed safely home by the ringing of the church bells. In thankfulness she directed that hay from her two fields should be spread on the church floor for the benefit of the congregation every year at the Patronal Festival on 29th June. This custom has been faithfully maintained every year since then, 1986 being the 200th anniversary.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Education

Wingrave with Rowsham Parish (Pop. 783)

One Daily School, endowed with £2 per annum, in which 5 children are instructed.

Two Sunday Schools, in one of which are 89 children of both sexes (commenced 1830), who attend the Established Church; the other (commenced 1819), appertains to Independent Dissenters, consisting of 77 children ; both Schools supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.